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View Full Version : Aye 'tis a trully a sad day. End of a local institution



Joe (SoCal)
01-25-2007, 11:23 AM
My Church is closing :(
I'm seriously sitting here with a tear in my eye for many a reason.
Written today in my local paper today;


To all our vallued customers and friends,
It becomes my sad duty to inform you that after 48 years of buisness we will be closing our doors for good Do to my health issues I no longer have the strenth to continue the buisness, nor can I ask anyone to do it for me. This was not an easy decision for the family but we feel it os time to focus on other things. I apprececiate everyone's love, support, phone calls and visits over these last few months.

All my love
John Guinan

John Guinan has brain cancer and his father is over 80. Tis a sad sad sad day for me

My church, my shelter in the storm, a one of kind place on the planet earth that always felt like home.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid161/pe8b5fed021abb8d33bf45353ccd4f6c2/f4cc6fbc.jpg

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Joe (SoCal)
01-25-2007, 11:23 AM
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Rob Stokes, N. Vancouver
01-25-2007, 11:26 AM
So? - take it over! C'mon - there's no better time in your life to do a complete right turn. You've got experience, you've got brains, you've got spunk, you've got a gap in your life right now that needs filling - what's holding you back??

Rob

Joe (SoCal)
01-25-2007, 11:29 AM
http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid209/p8236b6661d5c598a1a6b28faec3b67b0/ee3e22ea.jpg

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Joe (SoCal)
01-25-2007, 11:30 AM
So? - take it over! C'mon - there's no better time in your life that to do a complete right turn. You've got experience, you've got brains, you've got spunk, you've got a gap in your life right now that needs filling - what's holding you back??

Rob


Not allowed the Garison Landing Association has been giving them a deal for 30 years due to the fact that ONLY a Guinan can run the place. :(

John of Phoenix
01-25-2007, 11:32 AM
My Church is closing.

Some Communion service you guys have there. ;)

Rules? We don't need no stinking RULES!

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
01-25-2007, 11:33 AM
You could change your name...

Nanoose
01-25-2007, 11:33 AM
Condolances, Joe. It's hard to lose a home.

Joe (SoCal)
01-25-2007, 11:36 AM
You could change your name...

Not allowed the association that own the building and the land has allowed a prime spot on the Hudson to survive ONLY because a Guinan ran the place, one a Guinan gives it up it's gone

Read the book they wrote about my Church :( :( :( :( :(

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0060564067.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

Joe (SoCal)
01-25-2007, 11:36 AM
Condolances, Joe. It's hard to lose a home.


Honestly Im more upset about this than my wife leaving me.

John of Phoenix
01-25-2007, 11:36 AM
You could change your name...
Adoption is always an option.

So what are they gonna do, plow it under?

Joe (SoCal)
01-25-2007, 11:39 AM
They are having a Closing party ( more like a Irish Wake :( ) on January 31 st :( I will be in attendance dressed in black :( :( :(

Nanoose
01-25-2007, 11:45 AM
It's the sense of community we develop around places - whether this obviously special place, or the wooden boat community, or the live aboard community, or the church community, or the.......

Regardless of where, it is the loss of this sense of community that is so hard....it is an end, a death of a sort.

May you find another 'home', Joe. This one'll never be replaced, but may another arise quickly for you.

Joe (SoCal)
01-25-2007, 11:47 AM
LITTLE CHAPEL ON THE RIVER
From the Back Cover:

Nestled along the banks of the Hudson River directly across from the United States Military Academy at West Point sits the rural town of Garrison, New York, home to Guinan’s—a legendary Irish drinking hole and country store. While searching for a place to live and temporary haven following the September 11th attacks, Manhattan journalist Wendy Bounds was delivered to Guinan’s doorstep by a friend. And a visit that began with one beer, turned into a life-changing encounter.

http://www.gwendolynbounds.com/images/fileicon_pdf.gif Read the Prologue (http://www.gwendolynbounds.com/files/Prologuepdf.pdf) (129 KB)
http://www.gwendolynbounds.com/images/gbounds-340-Chapelsnow15.jpg
Guinan's Pub & Country Store
The "Little Chapel on the River"


Captivated by the bar’s charismatic but ailing owner, Jim Guinan, Bounds uprooted and moved to tiny Garrison. There she became one of the rare female regulars at the old pub and was quickly swept up by its motley characters and charms. What follows is a riveting journey as her fate, and that of Guinan’s, unfold. Told with sensitivity, humor, and an unflinching eye, the result is a love story about a place—and the people who bring it to life.

Along the journey you’ll meet: Jim Guinan himself, the stubborn high priest of this little chapel who spins rich tales of the town’s robber barons, castles and mythological swans who feed at his front door. His grown children, whose duty to their father, and the town, have kept Guinan’s up and running against immeasurable odds. Fitz, a tough-talking Vietnam vet who eventually takes the author under his wing. Tom Endres, who first rowed to the bar illegally as a cadet and now returns as a full-fledged colonel in the U.S Army. Walter, the kind-hearted and neurotic next-door neighbor who torches dandelions with his lighter. And Lou-Lou, the overweight doe-eyed hound and most faithful four-legged parishioner at the pub.

This book is as much about remembering to value the past as it is about learning to seize the present. Filled with stories of joy and sorrow, and universal family struggles with loyalty, love, betrayal and redemption, this is a work ultimately brimming with hope as Bounds expertly captures a nostalgic slice of quintessential American life. And while chronicling the pub’s fight to endure and her own grasp for a simpler way of life, she shares how and why the spirit moves those who come to worship in this little chapel on the river.




http://www.gwendolynbounds.com/images/gbounds-340-Viewofstools.jpg
Inside Guinan's Pub

Joe (SoCal)
01-25-2007, 11:51 AM
I've never cried over a pub but I'm sitting here welling up over this loss. Maybe its just the last straw of a dificult couple of months but to loose Guinans is almost too much to bear :(

Brian Palmer
01-25-2007, 11:52 AM
Man, once these kinds of placing are gone, they're gone. Kind of like the dusty old local hardware store with "new old stock" dating from the 1930's hidden in back. I feel for you and the family that runs this place.

-- Brian

John of Phoenix
01-25-2007, 11:54 AM
So what's going to happen to it? It's an established profitable business. Are they going to just knock it down an build condos? I thought Cold Spring had a preservation society or some such to preserve things.

Joe (SoCal)
01-25-2007, 11:56 AM
Hey, is this a Ballantine?” the hairy guy shouts, waving the


green bottle in my face.
Sweat begins to gather in small beads along my lower back. I
dig frantically in the red metal cooler, my slender hands trying
to recall the chilly terrain. Harp in left back. Budweiser on the right,
Guinness cans beside the Murphy’s Irish Stout. Rolling Rock mixed in
somewhere with the Ballantine.
“I wanted a Rolling Rock,” he says, leaning over the bar, stubbly
face in mine, breath heavy and sweet from a couple of hours
of drinking. “I told you I wanted a ROLLING ROCK.”
=
The tiny pub


is crowded, and it’s only 6:15 p.m. A light

breeze sneaks through the windows off the Hudson River. On
the opposite bank, I can see the fortresses of the West Point military
academy glowing hot in the late summer sun. The yellow
rays streak across the water and onto the backs of the men standing
in this green-walled, green-ceilinged Irish drinking hole nestled
between the river and railroad tracks. The pub, which is
barely big enough to hold the old giant metal Coca-Cola cooler
prologue
the bar
. . . this tastes like piss-water.



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2


| l i t t l e c h a p e l o n t h e r i v e r

stuffed with beer, red-topped bar and five stools, is tacked onto
the side of an old country store—almost as an afterthought. The
seventy-six-year-old owner lives upstairs, as he has for more than
four decades.
Today’s crowd is Friday’s typical motley mix of local bluecollar
guys, boaters from the makeshift yacht club out back and
commuters just off the train from New York City an hour south.
They stand close but not touching, their collective posture one
of possession and fine-tuned ease.
I know most of them by this point. There’s Fitz, a toughtalking
former U.S. federal marshal whose body is a topological
map of scars. Most visible is the bite wound on his right forearm
from when he broke up a fight between his unneutered dogs,
Buck and Ranger. It’s impressive, though not as thick as the scar
around his knee where AK-47 fire hit unexpectedly in Vietnam.
There are others, scars from Vietnam that is, but this last one is
what he might show you when the beer is going down good and
the memories anesthetized.
Two stools down from Fitz sits Dan, the white-haired liberal
lawyer who drinks ten-ounce Pepsis and eats serial packages of
Fig Newtons. Dan is more of a scotch and wine man himself but
comes to this beer bar to escape his depositions and trade barbs
with the ultraconservative Fitz. Currently, the lawyer is chatting
with Ed, one of the two handsome Preusser brothers, whose
mom runs the oldest high-end real estate agency in town. And at
my right elbow I see, or rather sense, Old Mike, a hearty, goodnatured
fellow who always stands sentinel at the bar’s end,
Schaefer bottle in hand, like a traffic cop. He was introduced to
me as Old Mike because there used to be a Young Mike—but nobody
talks about that much inside here.
The one person missing is Jane, the bar’s regular busty bartender,
who’s running late today, which is why I’m standing back
here screwing up orders.

Joe (SoCal)
01-25-2007, 11:56 AM
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p r o l o g u e : t h e b a r | 3

The truth is, I’ve never tended bar in my life until this moment.
In fact, since I got out of college nine years ago, I haven’t
done much of anything except churn out stories for the same national
newspaper about the wheelings and dealings of big corporations.
Right now, suffice it to say I always thought bartending
would be a little easier. After all, it’s just bottled beer at this
joint. Pop the caps, take the money, smile a little. Right?
Instead, I’m frantic, trying to remember five orders at once,
carry on multiple conversations and quickly add strings of $3.25s
and $2.75s in my head each time someone buys a round. But rule
number one here: no calculators. So I keep ticking off numbers
on my fingers. And I’m getting confused because the guys have
bought me a couple of beers, and they’re going to my head. I
don’t know where Jane is. And now I’ve just served the wrong
brand to some grizzly boater with the hairiest arms I’ve ever seen.

=

I look miserably at the open Ballantine bottle in his hand.
They’re both green, I offer lamely, finally laying my hands on
a Rolling Rock and hoping he’ll be a good sport and cut me a
break.
No chance.
“Yeah, except this tastes like piss-water,” he says, plunking the
Ballantine down on the counter before me.
My face reddens as the other guys laugh. They watch for a
moment, waiting, and I sense I’m flunking some unstated, crucial
test to hold my own back here.
Fine, I say lightly, setting the Ballantine aside and hoping no
one notices my hand shaking. I’m just wondering, though, I ask,
forcing myself to meet his bloodshot eyes. How do you know
what piss-water tastes like?
A pause. And then the tide turns. “Heh heh heh.” Fitz’s trademark
laugh sends my nemesis retreating to the back of the bar with
his Rolling Rock. The veteran keeps peace, though, by buying



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everyone a round, including the hairy stranger. Ed Preusser checks
his watch and says he’ll stay for just one more. So I gratefully begin
pulling out beers again, stacking coasters to keep count of each
person’s beer order.
Another rule here: no written bar tabs allowed.

=

When I finally look up again, I see the white-haired proprietor
moving slowly in his kitchen, which opens into the rear
of the pub. He takes the silver teakettle off the stove and pours
hot water into his cup. Then he pokes his head into his bar,
checks out the clientele and calls hello to a few. They all answer
like respectful schoolchildren: “Hi, Jimmy . . . Hello, Jim . . .
How ya feeling, Guinan?” Jim catches my eye. He nods and
shouts over their heads—“You’re doing just fine, luv”—and retreats
back into his living room. After he goes, I slip a few dollars
from my pocket into the wooden box that passes as the bar’s
cash register. That’s to cover the Ballantine mix-up. Then I notice
Fitz’s Beck’s is nearly empty. Leaning across the bar, I put
my hand gently on his arm and invoke one more unwritten rule.
“Next one’s on the house,” I say.=

This is the story of a place, the kind of joint you don’t find
around much anymore, a spot where people wander in once and
return for a lifetime.
For most of its days, the place billed itself as a country store,
but its true heart was the adjacent pub. There was a rusty horseshoe
posted above one door and a gold shamrock embedded,
slightly off center, in the fireplace hearth. The floor slanted toward
the river, and the men returned to the same seats every Friday.
Most people called it Guinan’s (sounds like Guy-nans) after
the Irish owner, Jim Guinan. Some called it the bar. One regular
patron christened it his “riverside chapel,” which seemed to me
to fit best because for most of these guys, coming to Guinan’s



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was something of a religion, with its own customs, community and
rites of passage. There was even a pastor of sorts—Jim—who on
a good night could tell a story that might run as long as a Sunday
sermon.
Folks had been congregating at Guinan’s quite a while before I
showed up—forty-two years, to be precise—which was long
enough for the place to have a memory and a cast of characters as
constant as the hourly trains rumbling by its windows. For them,
the cramped space was far more than a pit stop on the way
home—it was an extension of home itself. Guinan’s was where
they came after a death to toast and remember, on holidays and
birthdays to pay their respects and buy a round or two, or on a
late winter afternoon when a cold wind made things lonely
enough that you just needed to see a friendly face. When she was
alive, Jim’s wife, Peg, would welcome the men, scold them if
their language turned rough and offer supper to those who had
nowhere else to be. Here inside this family’s mismatched stucco
green walls, it was always safe.
When I stumbled upon this world in late 2001, I didn’t know
that all of this was on the brink of disappearing. And I wasn’t
looking for a story. In fact, all I really wanted was a quick beer and
to get back to New York City. What came next—upending my
life because of this hole-in-the-wall pub—suffice it to say, was
never supposed to happen. At least not by any plan I’d laid out.
But I’m getting ahead of myself.
There is a beginning, so let’s start there. It is morning, and the
sky is a brilliant blue and clear, the air unusually warm for September. . . .

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Nanoose
01-25-2007, 12:17 PM
Reading every word.

Thanks for sharing the spirit of this place with us, Joe.

Bob Cleek
01-25-2007, 12:42 PM
Nothing to it, seriously. Just have old man Guinan adopt you. You then become a Guinan! (He can write you out of his will, so his real relatives won't get upset.) And, you don't have to change your name or anything. Just take it over. Make him an offer: you pay yourself a salary and you pay him and his estate off to buy him out from the proceeds over time. Check with your accountant. I think you may find that an intra-family transfer of ownership could provide significant tax advantages!

Joe, you have a PERSONALITY which may not be suited for much, but we all have our niches. If in real life you are anything like your forum persona, I'd say God made you to run this pub.

Sure, it's a slick trick, but the entire community is going to be behind you and Guinan on this one. I can't imagine you being better at anything than being a publican!

GO FOR IT!

Katherine
01-25-2007, 12:47 PM
If in real life you are anything like your forum persona, I'd say God made you to run this pub.
He is. :rolleyes: :D I'd thought of that idea too, but wasn't sure how legal or practical it was.

Ed Harrow
01-25-2007, 12:50 PM
America at it's best, and it's melting away...

Joe (SoCal)
01-25-2007, 12:51 PM
Can't 1/2 of the deal is that it's Guinans through and through, strait down the line. The other is part of the place was and is John & Jim Guinan. It's their choice and I know it must not have come easy to make this choice for them. I'm sure there have been offers made its a tight nit congregation with a few wealthy parishioners, like the former governor Pataki and lesser known with more capital to throw at it. The spirit of the place has always been a Guinan and John & Jim at the door> I could not ever even come close to them, it would be an imitation.

I will stop by tonight for a pint and hear the true tale. I feel bad that I have not been in for a few weeks since I have had a lot going on in my life recently. I feel ashamed that I had to hear the rumor and then read it in the paper and I did not hear it from John himself. When I think about all the missed time I did not go because I always thought it would always be there I could kick myself. So many days I could have enjoyed at my church.

Joe (SoCal)
01-25-2007, 12:54 PM
Is Wendy Bounds single?;)
She could become Wendy Guinan pretty quickly.

Na truth be told there is a Mrs. Bounds if ya folla ;)

jack grebe
01-25-2007, 12:59 PM
I have done a lot of traveling over the last few yrs. and it is sad to see the many places like this that are disappearing.....Americana is being lost to the big chain "fern" places. All you see is the same, town after town, state after state.....yea, it sucks:( .

Keith Wilson
01-25-2007, 01:03 PM
If in real life you are anything like your forum persona, I'd say God made you to run this pub. I couldn't agree more. You say you'd be an imitation, but it'd be a good imitation. It may not work out, but at least consider it seriously.

Leon m
01-25-2007, 01:11 PM
The spirit of the place has always been a Guinan and John & Jim at the door> I could not ever even come close to them, it would be an imitation.

. [/COLOR]

Never say Never... Doesn't have to be"John & Jim" to have spirit,the spirit can change as long as it still has "spirit".This has got Joe writtin all over it ... JUST DO IT !

Bruce Hooke
01-25-2007, 01:38 PM
I'll take the other side...sometimes it is best to accept when the time has come for something to die and to mourn its passing rather than trying to hang onto something that can't be held onto.

Down the road there may be a way to think about whether something new can be created, inspired by the past example...

I suspect you are right as well that this was the straw the pushed you over the edge. So, be gentle on yourself. Treasure the memories, but remember that they are almost certainly some good times yet to come...

Popeye
01-25-2007, 01:43 PM
any place i ever found and liked and patronized .. closed

there is still one or two reeaaaal oolddd pubs still left , gotta go pay my respects (or maybe not)

http://www.enroutemag.com/images/septembre05/iconsg-shippub.jpg

BrianW
01-25-2007, 01:57 PM
Well bummer. I was hoping to bend an elbow there with ya someday.

Leon m
01-25-2007, 02:00 PM
I'll take the other side...sometimes it is best to accept when the time has come for something to die and to mourn its passing rather than trying to hang onto something that can't be held onto.

...

With due respect...HOGWASH...Go for it Joe !:D

George Jung
01-25-2007, 02:11 PM
"Eat (and drink....) at Joes'

I like it; it has cachet....

S.V. Airlie
01-25-2007, 02:17 PM
Glad I had a chance to visit.. And I have the book.... A fun read..
Sorry Joe... a nice little corner of the world..

Bob Cleek
01-25-2007, 02:25 PM
There's more than one way to skin a cat. How about Guinan holds on to it just long enough to have the place declared a National Landmark. That way, nobody could do anything much to get rid of it ever!

Joe (SoCal)
01-25-2007, 02:46 PM
There's more than one way to skin a cat. How about Guinan holds on to it just long enough to have the place declared a National Landmark. That way, nobody could do anything much to get rid of it ever!

Just came back from an exploratory soup and beer exposition at the Church. Lots of behind the scenes shenanigans that I'm not privy to as will be with a place that has been there as long and is is bound to have swept copious amounts of strife under the carpet.

Long story short is the Garrison Landing Association who owns the lease and the land has been waiting and praying for such a day to arrive for years. Its a prime location and ol Guinans aint been paying 2007 prices for a long time. More like 1957 rent if ya folla.

As suspected there have been other far more qualified who have made the overture. John's daughter for one who is a true heir of the Guinan family in name and disposition is seriously dating Ed Prusser who is named in the book and is one of the central characters. They have made an offer to take tha place over. They have far better credentials than yours truly and have been given a no go by the Garison Landing Association.

As much as I would like to throw my hat in the ring and I did so in typical subtle Irish style by telling Mr. Guinan senior, ; I'm sorry fer yer troubles , and if there is ANY WAY I can help you keep it on I want ya to know I'm willing, <wink & nod >

Fella's thats the best I can do.

S.V. Airlie
01-25-2007, 02:51 PM
Joe.. A member of the family is a member of the family... To me, unless the lease specifically says male heir, the daughter fits the lease....as a potential leasee... Evan.. what do you think?

Lew Barrett
01-25-2007, 03:05 PM
Just stumbled onto this thread. Great story. There will be more to say about this later.

Chris Coose
01-25-2007, 03:13 PM
Looks like it wouldn't take too much to barge and float the sumbitch.
Drop the roof a story to reduce windage and COG.
See if Pete Seegar will share the river, maybe toss some preservation dough your way.

If I got news the "Ripper" (the Rip Tide) in Marblehead was going down... despite the long family tradition we have in the place, I wouldn't lose a moment in "the grief" (an old Irish tradition). They'd have to declare it a cemetary for all the skeletons locked away.

Joe (SoCal)
01-25-2007, 03:50 PM
Joe.. A member of the family is a member of the family... To me, unless the lease specifically says male heir, the daughter fits the lease....as a potential lease... Evan.. what do you think?

Lets just say The Garrison Landing Association has been holding all the cards for a long time. I think they have out of the kindness and love for the joint have allowed Guinans to continue as long as John or Jim have wanted to run it. Once they relinquished the reins there was probably no usable lease for a long time, just a wink and nod and another day passed.

The sad situation is a long time ago when the young immigrant Jim Guinan worked at the general store and was given the opportunity to buy it from Major General Frederick Henry Osborn who was a dear friend and simply known as The General http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Osborn At the time a young Irish immigrant did not go to a bank so The General held the note. And as occasionally happens in life, the young Irish immigrant with 3 children and a wife fell on hard times and sold the note back to The General and leased the place back at a nominal rent. It was that bit of history that has transpired and The General who has since his passing in 1981 become The Garrison Landing Association and with less personal friendship to the Guinans then The General once had.

Rob Stokes, N. Vancouver
01-25-2007, 05:30 PM
C'mon Joe - when life takes a dump on ya there's no better elixir than a good cause that requires a sound and well thought through fight of good against evil. The reigns are being dangled in front of ya - grab 'em!

Rob

Katherine
01-25-2007, 05:34 PM
Can the building be moved?

BrianW
01-25-2007, 06:39 PM
This looks like a good place to bend an elbow...

http://www.thebusinessneighborhood.com/sitecreator//meetinghouse/images/MH5.jpg

...no yellow bumper stickers visible, must be the angle. ;)

StevenBauer
01-25-2007, 06:51 PM
Sad news, Joe. I've only been a few times but after reading the book I do feel a connection. So sorry,

Steven

Ken Hutchins
01-25-2007, 07:19 PM
Joe, quickly get it listed on the National Register of Historic Places, that may save it.:D

Memphis Mike
01-25-2007, 07:20 PM
Sorry to hear it Joe. I was only there for a few minutes but if I was still drinkin, it looked like a place I might want to get drunk in.:D

Great view of the river. A place with some real history and character.

Mrleft8
01-25-2007, 07:49 PM
Don't be a dolt. Buy it and keep it up. What'll it cost? Call me at Margo's.

Paul Girouard
01-25-2007, 07:52 PM
Don't be a dolt. Buy it and keep it up. What'll it cost? Call me at Margo's.


Margo's Tavern, in Guilford??

Mrleft8
01-25-2007, 07:57 PM
Margo's Tavern, in Guilford??
Margo's house in saint Augustine Florida..... What rock have you been hiding under Paul? ;)

Paul Girouard
01-25-2007, 08:17 PM
Margo's house in saint Augustine Florida..... What rock have you been hiding under Paul? ;)


I was partly kidding but had thought you had went back to Conn. In one of Margo's post she said she stained something "Once you (Lefty ) had left" I took that as in left for Conn. Seems your still in Fl. :D

Well I'm on a rock / Whidbey's nick name , but still on top of it , not under:) I did attend a funeral today , but it wasn't mine ;)

Here's the post : After Doug left and we had some privacy :o, I gave Sarah a sponge bath forward

From :http://www.woodenboatvb.com/vbulletin/upload/showthread.php?t=60815&page=3

First post to that thread in fact.

She must have meant left EARLY for the day,:eek: Spendy NE high strung help:eek: :D Mutter, mutter off EARLY:mad: :D

Mrleft8
01-25-2007, 08:46 PM
Yeah..... Left early after an 8 hour day on my tippy toes bent over like a question mark in 49 degree drizzly weather after walking up and down mismatched steps 10,000 times in one day..... OOPS! THE BOSS JUST WALKED IN! GOTTA GO! :D

Minnesota
01-25-2007, 09:16 PM
Joe-
Sad news. My boat is named Lady Cliff. I've googled it and think the name must come from former Lady Cliff Academy, which must have been near Guinan's?
A very tangential connection to this pretty interesting thread. Over and out...

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
01-25-2007, 10:55 PM
I'm very sorry to hear this sad news Joe.
I was wanting to tip one with you there someday.
We'll just have to find another place.
I know....I know.....it's won't be the same.
Damn.

Joe (SoCal)
01-31-2007, 07:21 AM
Yippee

A diligent group of parishioners (yours truly included ) have put together an offer to keep our church running.

Made todays NY Times. :D


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/01/31/nyregion/towns75.jpgOUR TOWNS
An Irish Bar, Defying Time, Manages to Cheat It
By PETER APPLEBOME
Published: January 31, 2007

http://select.nytimes.com/gst/tsc.html?URI=http://select.nytimes.com/2007/01/31/nyregion/31towns.html&OQ=_rQ3D1&OP=152ce064Q2FI!nRIAQ24W__AIQ27ccaIc7IE7IoJWnQ5B)_ oIE7A_!oQ24XQ3EA9S

A bar in Garrison, N.Y., will stay open just a little longer thanks to offers from customers to help run it.

To continue reading this article, you must be a subscriber to TimesSelect.

Does any forum member subscribe to TimesSelect so they can post the article ?

S.V. Airlie
01-31-2007, 07:23 AM
Congrats Joe....No, don't subscribe so can't post the thread...
Could ya summarize how ya got around the issue of " family run/owned " glitch?

Joe (SoCal)
01-31-2007, 07:35 AM
I don't want to speak out of turn but essentially, the family will continue to run it with a little help from their friends ;)

Mrleft8
01-31-2007, 08:27 AM
Excellent!

Joe (SoCal)
01-31-2007, 09:02 AM
Excellent!

Most

Got the paper great quote ;


A place kept going by what one regular calls human duct tape.

:)

Wild Dingo
01-31-2007, 09:17 AM
So if I lob up I just ask for "barman Joe"? or is that glass collector Joe? :D Dogsbody Joe? :D ...well done to all involved :cool:

So many of these old time pubs are shutting down and making way for the bullshyte modern style "pub" with their constant damned doof doof doof bloody musak or the screachin disco shyte... serving strawberry or cherry beers and other muck... give me a good old fashioned bar like that any damned day! :cool:

Joe (SoCal)
01-31-2007, 09:32 AM
An Irish Bar, Defying Time, Manages to Cheat It

GARRISON, N.Y.

It's perched above the Hudson like a rickety Irish capsule - a country store and pub where there's coffee and doughnuts for commuters every morning, Bud and Guinness for the bar crowd every night, live Irish music the first Thursday after every full moon and small revelations in between.

It's where Tom Endres used to row surreptitiously across the river when he was a cadet at West Point and visits still, where Wendy bounds wandered in one day two months after 9/11 and a few years later emerged with a book called "Little Chapel on the River", where the cast of characters over the years has included, andy the opera singing bartender, Lou-Lou the dog and Fionnuala the swan. And most of all, from the moment an Irish immigrant named Jim Guinan opened the place by the railroad tracks in 1959 with $316, it's been where the Guinan family has managed to defy time and space. it's where Jim lives above the store when he's not ministering to the flock, where his son John picked up the mantle to keep it going three years back, where the off-center shamrock still graces the fireplace and the cash register is the 1927 Federal that's as big as a boat anchor. At Guinan's it may not be 1959, but it sure aint 2007.

So while the announcement in The Putnam County News & Recorder last week didn't come as a complete surprise, it still came as a shock, as jarring as a world where cows flew, horses sang "Danny Boy" and there was no Guinan's on Garrison's Landing.
"To all our valued customers and friends,
It becomes my sad duty to inform you that after 48 years of business we will be closing our doors for good Do to my health issues I no longer have the strength to continue the business, nor can I ask anyone to do it for me. This was not an easy decision for the family but we feel it os time to focus on other things. I appreciate everyone's love, support, phone calls and visits over these last few months.

All my love
John Guinan "

January 31 will be our last day - we will be open all day. Please join us for a final beer and toast to family and good friends. "

In truth, this was not the first time Guinan's had a glimps of it's own demise. Two years after it opened, Jim Guinan almost packed it in untill a new lease arrangement made it feasible to continue. Then after Jims wife, Peg, died in 1988, as his diabetes got worse in the 1990s, as people wondered who these days could run a country store that caters to both the commuters catching the 4:44 a.m. train and the drinkers at night, it was as if the shadow of mortality was always just around the corner. For those who philosphized about Guinan's - which meant almost everone who walked in the door - it sank in that Guinan's was living on borrowed time.

Joe (SoCal)
01-31-2007, 09:33 AM
cont :

And then the philosophical became real. Last fall, John Guinan, the rock who kept the thing going, felt a numbness on his left side when driving to open the store one morning. He suffered a seizure on the way to the hospital an was found to have a malignant brain tumor. His as was simply a recognition of the obvious - without John to run it, there could be no Guinan's

But then, if this were a wholly rational world, there probably couldn't be a Guinan's anyway. And as the word leaked out, even before the ad ran, a group of regulars gathered at the bar to figure out a way to cheat time once more. The first thought was they needed Guinan's for what it meant to them - the coffee for the commuters, the beer and companionship at night. The second was they needed Guinan's for what it meant for the family, especially Jim Guinan, now 81, who had lived there since 1959.

I DEAS were kicked around about how people could help. Among others, Mary Ellen Yannitelli, whose husband's family once owned the place before the Gunans, said she could work a day a week and do whatever was needed.

On Monday, two days before it was supposed to close, John Guinan's sister Margaret, a police detective, agreed to run it for another year and his daughter, Kelly, agreed to help. "It helps in lots of ways," said John Guinan. "It gives Dad a place to live. It gives the customers a way to enjoy the store for a time frame longer. It's another way friendship, human duct tape as Wendy put it, keeps this place going. "

Maybe you can't live on borrowed time forever. But the next full moon is Friday. The following thursday there will be Irish music at Guinan's The beer will flow. The walls will shake. The green shamrock will shimmer over the Hudson. And time will have to wait another year - a good bit more if the faithful are lucky to get paid back

Joe (SoCal)
01-31-2007, 09:44 AM
Geez Joe, are you typing this? If this is a cut and paste, the TimesSelect better get a new proofreader.:D

Yea I'm typing the whole thing :eek: , its a worthwhile story and I will go back and proofread my typos best I can. ;)

Keith Wilson
01-31-2007, 10:02 AM
Dogsbody Joe?I like that! Maybe it will catch on. :D "Dogsbody Joe" - now there's a moniker with some meat on it!
I'm very pleased the place will stay open; Good news for sure.

Joe (SoCal)
01-31-2007, 10:32 AM
Edited to the best of my ability. A worthwhile post ;)

Dogsbody Joe ™ ;)

Joe (SoCal)
01-31-2007, 11:45 AM
OK
Here ye, Here ye !!!!

All those WBF members with in sight of this post; you are cordially invited tonight to pray with me and become born again bathed in the green neon shamrock light that is Guinan's, for what was supposed to be an end of en era but is now the continuation of something wonderful.

I will be arriving at 8:00 p.m. and I will be glad to give anyone directions or tell them how they can walk off the Metro North Train and into the front door. Spare couch and floor space at my new bachelor pad available on a first come first served basis :D

S.V. Airlie
01-31-2007, 11:52 AM
Joe.. I ain't sleeping with Lucky....then again, ain't sleeping with you either although you would take up less room. LOL....Yes, I know.. you don't shed....

Have a good time tonight.. umm.. drive safely please... :)

Nanoose
01-31-2007, 11:54 AM
Good news! Good news!! As you raise that beer, think of us.

Phillip Allen
01-31-2007, 12:02 PM
That is good news Joe...gladness on a snowy day

Katherine
01-31-2007, 12:07 PM
Wish I could join you guys. However, I would not be sleeping with Joe either. :D

Joe (SoCal)
01-31-2007, 12:10 PM
Wish I could join you guys. However, I would not be sleeping with Joe either. :D

You don't know what your missing ;) I'm sort of single now so I can say that ;)
Eeek :eek: :eek: although it feels very strange to do so. So I think I won't just yet ;)

John of Phoenix
01-31-2007, 12:11 PM
You buying? ;)

Glad to hear it.

S.V. Airlie
01-31-2007, 12:13 PM
Why do I get the sneaking impression that Joe ain't leaving the chapel alone....

Bruce Hooke
01-31-2007, 12:25 PM
:) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :)

WONDERFUL NEWS!

I wish I could come down for the celebration...

George Jung
01-31-2007, 02:04 PM
Good story; I'm curious - how'd you get the Times to pick up the story? That was a nice move.

Joe (SoCal)
01-31-2007, 03:40 PM
Good story; I'm curious - how'd you get the Times to pick up the story? That was a nice move.

Told ya we have a high powered congregation ;)
I just spent lunch at the Chapel, sitting to the right hand of Mr. Guinan himself. Listening to him preach to the disciples who have sat vigil.

Tonight we have a good evening planed, I'm looking forward to it :D

Joe (SoCal)
01-31-2007, 06:10 PM
YouTube video tonight ?
Ya think ? ;)

Bob Adams
01-31-2007, 06:27 PM
Praise the Lord, the Tavernacle has been saved!

Phil Heffernan
02-01-2007, 12:28 AM
Good story; I'm curious - how'd you get the Times to pick up the story? That was a nice move.

Twas no move...Peter Applebome is one of the many great writers who is employed by the NY Times to simply roam the Hudson Valley and find great stories...

He covered my write-in upset victory 2 years ago in Cold Spring, and his stories are usually quirky & very well written...

Here's his whole story:




January 31, 2007
Our Towns
An Irish Bar, Defying Time, Manages to Cheat It

By PETER APPLEBOME
GARRISON, N.Y.

It’s perched above the Hudson like a rickety Irish time capsule — a country store and pub where there’s coffee and doughnuts for commuters every morning, Bud and Guinness for the bar crowd every night, live Irish music the first Thursday after every full moon and small revelations most nights in between.

It’s where Tom Endres used to row surreptitiously across the river when he was a cadet at West Point and visits still, where Wendy Bounds wandered in one day two months after 9/11 and a few years later emerged with a book called “Little Chapel on the River,” where the cast of characters over the years has included Andy the opera singing bartender, Lou-Lou the dog and Fionnuala the swan.

And most of all, from the moment an Irish immigrant named Jim Guinan opened the place by the railroad tracks in 1959 with $316, it’s been where the Guinan family has managed to defy time and space. It’s where Jim lives above the store when’s he’s not ministering to the flock, where his son John picked up the mantle to keep it going three years back, where the off-center shamrock still graces the fireplace and the cash register is the 1927 Federal that’s as big as a boat anchor. At Guinan’s it may not be 1959, but it sure ain’t 2007.

So while the announcement in The Putnam County News & Recorder last week didn’t come as a complete surprise, it still came as a shock, as jarring as a world where cows flew, horses sang “Danny Boy” and there was no Guinan’s on Garrison’s Landing.

“To all our valued customers and friends,” began the letter from John Guinan. “It becomes my sad duty to inform you that after 48 years of business we will be closing our doors for good.” There was a reference to health issues that made it impossible to stay open, and there were thanks for everyone’s love and support. “January 31 will be our last day — we will be open all day. Please join us for a final beer and toast to family and good friends.”

In truth, this was not the first time Guinan’s had glimpsed its own demise. Two years after it opened, Jim Guinan almost packed it in until a new lease arrangement made it feasible to continue. Then after Jim’s wife, Peg, died in 1988, as his diabetes got worse in the 1990s, as people wondered who these days could run a country store that caters to both the commuters catching the 4:44 a.m. train and the drinkers at night, it was as if the shadow of mortality was always just around the corner. For those who philosophized about Guinan’s — which meant almost everyone who walked in the door — it sank in that Guinan’s was living on borrowed time.

And then the philosophical became real. Last fall, John Guinan, the rock who kept the thing going, felt a numbness on his left side when driving to open the store one morning. He suffered a seizure on the way to the hospital and was found to have a malignant brain tumor. His ad was simply a recognition of the obvious — without John to run it, there could be no Guinan’s.

But then, if this were a wholly rational world, there probably couldn’t be a Guinan’s anyway. And as the word leaked out, even before the ad ran, a group of regulars gathered at the bar to figure out a way to cheat time once more. The first thought was they needed Guinan’s for what it meant to them — the coffee for the commuters, the beer and companionship at night. The second was they needed Guinan’s for what it meant for the family, especially Jim Guinan, now 81, who had lived there since 1959.

IDEAS were kicked around about how people could help. Among others, Mary Ellen Yannitelli, whose husband’s family once owned the place before the Guinans, said she could work a day a week and do whatever was needed.

On Monday, two days before it was supposed to close, John Guinan’s sister Margaret, a police detective, agreed to run it for another year and his daughter, Kelly, agreed to help. “It helps in lots of ways,” said John Guinan. “It gives Dad a place to live. It gives the customers a way to enjoy the store for a time frame longer. It’s another way friendship, human duct tape as Wendy put it, keeps this place going.”

Maybe you can’t live on borrowed time forever. But the next full moon is Friday. The following Thursday, there will be Irish music at Guinan’s. The beer will flow. The walls will shake. The green shamrock will shimmer over the Hudson. And time will have to wait another year — a good bit more if the faithful are lucky — to get paid back.

E-mail: peappl@nytimes.com


Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company


"And time will have to wait another year — a good bit more if the faithful are lucky — to get paid back."

Man...I LOVE that line....Nothing is finer than CHEATING Time..LOL

PH

Joe (SoCal)
02-01-2007, 12:38 AM
An evening at Guinan's Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_H3BG8158Q

Peter Kalshoven
02-01-2007, 12:49 AM
Ah, boyo, for a dogsbody, you make a damn fine film.

Cheers.

It's still there.

Bruce Hooke
02-01-2007, 12:59 AM
Beautiful!

That blackberry jam looks like it might be very tasty.

landlocked sailor
02-01-2007, 02:01 AM
I'd say that this is the best and only worthwhile thing I've ever read about in THE BILGE!! Slante, Rick

Joe (SoCal)
02-01-2007, 05:20 AM
Aye Gee-z-a-Louse Phil, where the hell were ya on page one of this thread when I freakin hand typed the whole damn article :rolleyes: :D

But 'tis a good thing ya got PETER APPLEBOME'S email address I think I'll send him the video link for fun. ;)

By the way it was a very hard video to shoot simply because it's hard to shoot video, yack it up with everyone that walks into the joint and still drink your pint of Guinness at the same time :D

Aye an a morning bump fer de video ;)

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
02-01-2007, 07:13 PM
Wow!
That is so cool.
Congrats.
Another interesting chapter in small town living.

landlocked sailor
02-12-2007, 01:56 AM
bump??? Rick

Wild Dingo
02-12-2007, 02:43 AM
)

By the way it was a very hard video to shoot simply because it's hard to shoot video, yack it up with everyone that walks into the joint and still drink your pint of Guinness at the same time :D


Dont tell me you drink that shyte Joeboy? :eek: Man did you just take a dive in me future drinkin partners list :(

REDEEM THYSELF YOUNG JOEBOY REDEEM THYSELF!

Mrleft8
02-12-2007, 10:11 AM
Dont tell me you drink that shyte Joeboy? :eek: Man did you just take a dive in me future drinkin partners list :(

REDEEM THYSELF YOUNG JOEBOY REDEEM THYSELF!
Better'n Tooth's Sheaf Stout....

Keith Wilson
02-12-2007, 10:55 AM
Awww, Dingo . . .

http://www.iln.org.uk/iln_years/year/images/guinness1929a.jpg

:D :D

Joe (SoCal)
03-03-2007, 05:08 AM
Just recieved this email figured I would post it on this thread ;


A NIGHT FOR JOHN"

The Garrison community has organized a special night of music (plus drink & light buffet & desserts & coffee) honoring and aiding John Guinan, Friday, March 9th, 7 p.m. onward. At the InnCredible Caterers Chalet tucked beneath Breakneck Ridge up Route 9D.

Music by Garrison's own Uncle Wade, Motherlode Trio, and what might be called Guinan's Irish Irregulars, the great Celtic soup of fiddlers, flutists, pipers, accordionists and singers who have gathered through so many years each Thursday past the full moon in the back room or on the front deck between the river and rails at Garrison's train stop. Jonathan Kruk will likely tell a tale or two. Surprises for sure.

The event is aimed at raising spirits and funds for John Guinan, son of Jim Guinan and one of the living, breathing cornerstones of our part of the Hudson Valley (see recent New York Times story below). John is fighting the effects of a brain tumor and unreimbursed medical costs are piling up. As many of you know, Guinans, the general store-***-bar-***-civic-center on Garrison Landing has long been a center of gravity and levity in our increasingly un-centered lives.

We feel we owe him bigtime. Some details still being ironed out.

Pledges of support for John (and underwriting to defray the modest costs for food and facility... bands are pro bono, of course) have already begun rolling in and will be taken before, during, and after the show.

For info, contact Wendy Bounds at wendy.bounds@wsj.com, Andy Revkin at anrevk@nytimes.com, or Mary Ellen Yannitelli at ayinc1@aol.com.

Please pass this note around!

Nanoose
03-03-2007, 09:48 AM
I hope, and think, they'll raise a s**tload of $$. Very worthwhile event.

Joe (SoCal)
01-11-2008, 10:48 AM
Well it's a sad day once again :(
The brief reprieve is over. Guinans will close on January 31 :(
It was a noble effort by everyone, but the human duct tape can only hold for so long.

The last Rising of the Moon Irish night will be on Thursday January 24th

:( :( :( :(

S.V. Airlie
01-11-2008, 10:58 AM
Sorry Joe. Glad I was able to go there once and I still have the hat!

Bruce Hooke
01-11-2008, 11:10 AM
Sorry about the bad news...

StevenBauer
01-11-2008, 12:19 PM
Sad news. I wonder if I could shake free to come down for Irish Night.


Steven

Russ Manheimer
01-11-2008, 01:28 PM
Pull a pint for me Joe. Sorry to hear the bad news again.

Russ

Robbie 2
01-11-2008, 08:51 PM
Sad news...Institutions like these cannot be replaced and replicas that people seem to build all look SO FAKE....
Enjoy your last pint and toast the memories.
Regards
Robbie:(

Peter Malcolm Jardine
01-11-2008, 09:43 PM
Sorry to hear the news Joe.... I have to count going to Cold Spring, meeting you and yours, having a soda and a sandwich at Guinans, and going for a sail in Tidbit, as the highlight of this past summer. I mean that.