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View Full Version : Sun Tzu - Why supporting the troops means you have to oppose the War in Iraq.



Tylerdurden
12-13-2006, 03:49 PM
August 30, 2005, 1:07 pm

As the anti-war protests gather momentum the length and breadth of the USA, the pro-war chickenhawks have launched a desperate propoganda campaign to discredit the anti-war movement.
Extremist broadcasters such as Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity, the mouthpieces of the Bush Junta, have embarked upon a smear campaign that revolves around one simple argument, namely that you cannot support the troops and be anti-war at the same time. The notion that all anti-war supporters are also by association of belief, anti-military, is at first, a logical argument, however, upon closer examination, like most propoganda built on lies, it tends to fall apart very quickly.

You can be anti-war whilst at the same time, pro-military. Sun Tzu, the greatest military strategist of all time, states,"The supreme excellence is not to win a hundred victories in a hundred battles. The supreme excellence is to subdue the armies of your enemies without even having to fight them." In essence, beating the enemy without firing a shot is seen, by Sun Tzu, as being the "supreme excellence". The pro-war chickenhawks, who get off on Faux News broadcasting pictures of bright lights and loud bangs, as exemplified Faux News` coverage of "shock and awe", completely miss this point. They think that supporting the troops means shouting "yeehaw" every time a bomb goes off on their 48 inch plasma TV screens and sticking a yellow ribbon on the back of their trucks, but for them to do this, the military has to be engaged and kids have to be dying. During peace time, there are no yellow ribbons on trucks. It`s a bizarre irony that many commentators miss, the only time chickenhawks actually support the troops is when US soldiers are getting killed or maimed. The anti-war movement, who believe war should be the last option, and that conflicts can be won without sacrificing our brave soldiers, are actually reinforcing what Sun Tzu states, and therefore, offering more "support" to the military at the outset.

Sun Tzu states that there are six attributes that will determine whether conflict should be entered into, and without having dominance in all of these attributes, an army will be defeated. I will go into these a little later on, however even in Sun Tzu`s advice prior to a military campaign starting, one can see that Dubya placed the US military in an unwinnable position. In the early stages of the Art of War, he warns to beware of high level Dumb" (or "beware of high level Dumbya" perhaps). He states catageorically, that there are three ways a "president" can bring misfortune. Perhaps the most striking example of interference that Sun Tzu warns about is when the president, "interferes with the army`s administration without knowledge of the internal affairs of the army". In Dubya`s case, his refusal to listen to his pentagon advisers such as General Shinseki (http://www.smirkingchimp.com/print.php?sid=22451) who warned him that troop levels were woefully inadequate is a prime example of "high level dumb", and we are seeing the costs in terms of US deaths every day.



Continued......http://www.djpauledge.com/blog.php?id=108

htom
12-13-2006, 04:55 PM
Pretty much totally mis-understanding Sun Tzu -- who would agree that Bush risks losing by not having control of the media and thus popular opinion.

Keith Wilson
12-13-2006, 05:30 PM
. . . Bush risks losing by not having control of the media and thus popular opinion.Democracy sure is messy and incovenient when the ruler wants to start a war, isn't it?

LeeG
12-13-2006, 05:39 PM
GW is the starter, he started the war.

Osborne Russell
12-13-2006, 06:17 PM
The supreme excellence is to subdue the armies of your enemies without even having to fight them." In essence, beating the enemy without firing a shot is seen, by Sun Tzu, as being the "supreme excellence".

1. Shooting costs.

2. The less you shoot, the less it costs.

3. The less you spend, the more you have.

4. The more you have, the less inclined the enemy is to fight.

Not rocket science; but perhaps not part of Air National Guard training, either.