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View Full Version : split red cedar plank on 1947 Blanchard



Emmablue
10-18-2005, 09:44 PM
My 26 foot Senior Knockabout was hit by a boat on the starboard bow and it split the top plank for about 5 feet. Do I have to replace the plank or can it be repaired?

Bob Smalser
10-18-2005, 11:24 PM
Probably. The shear plank or strake, right?

All the wood still there? Did you check to see if it cracked the frame behind the plank? Can you get at its upper edge by removing rails and covering board for the length of the crack? But the labor and materials difference between accessing that upper edge and repairing the plank by scarfing in new wood probably weighs in favor of unfastening to spring the plank outwards and scarfing in new wood.

There's also a couple quickie repair techniques involving temporary blocking or caulking to clamp the crack tight to glue it up that may or may not be a good solution.

A photo would help.

[ 10-19-2005, 01:39 AM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Emmablue
10-19-2005, 06:30 PM
Yep it's the strake. There is a toe rail and a rub rail to remove and then there is the deck (it's plywood.) I do not see any broken frames. The other boat broke its mooring and hit Hooky so it was powered by a north wind not a motor or sail. I can't seem to add a picture but I'll keep trying that.

Nicholas Carey
10-19-2005, 07:10 PM
If I remember right, on an Blanchard Senior Knockabout, you shouldn't have to remove the deck to replace the sheerstrake.

You'll need to remove the rubrail, natch, and probably the toerail, but WRT the sheerstrake itself, it should be a pretty straightforward job to remove/replace it. Internal chainplates, so they should be good.

BTW, if you want an unsolicited recommendation for a good boatwright, I know of one whose work I can highly recommend. Brad Rice did a lot of great work restoring PIRATE (http://www.r-boat.org), so I know whereof I speak (and no, I've got no financial interest here: no kickbacks, commisions, whatever. Brad's just a good boatwright and we like to see him busy.)

Brad just moved from Seattle up to Whidbey Island. He's he's about 15 minutes from you, down the road in Freeland:

Brad Rice, The Boatwright (http://www.theboatwright.com/)
4785 E Harbor Road
Freeland, WA
206/784-5077
bradrice@theboatwright.com

Tell him I sent you.

Cheers,

N.

Emmablue
10-19-2005, 07:22 PM
Thank you, Sounds like a good guy to know.

Bob Smalser
10-19-2005, 08:26 PM
Plywood precludes getting at the top of the plank.

Before buying stock for a new plank section or hiring anybody, you can try reefing the seam, digging out the screw plugs (a deck screw driven into them is fast) unfastening the plank at the stem or hood end and far enough back so it springs out. Then you can glue and clamp it using marine epoxy, reattach and recaulk. I like to bronze drift such repairs from the top, but am not sure your planks are thick enough.

Emmablue
10-19-2005, 09:09 PM
I think I will start this weekend. I am hearing that my original question is answered...I need to repair this problem by pulling the plank. If I don't pull the plank all the way off...just to the end of the split which migrates up towards the deck, how do I cut it? I am assuming it will be a scarf joint with the scarf facing the ribs but how do I physically make that cut and then match my new cedar plank to it when it is hanging there off the hull? Sounds difficult. I want to try this because I love the whole idea. I can't do more harm than the harm that is already done right?

Emmablue
10-19-2005, 10:12 PM
I misunderstood you. Now I see that you mean I repair the split with epoxy and don't use a scarf joint and new plank. Sorry. That sounds like a much better idea.

Bob Smalser
10-20-2005, 12:23 AM
In addition to doing the epoxy in two stages, unthickened and thickened, if you play a heat gun gently on the first coat, it will seep deeper into the splintered wood for a stronger repair.

Nicholas Carey
10-20-2005, 03:27 PM
Originally posted by Bob Smalser:
I like to bronze drift such repairs from the top, but am not sure your planks are thick enough.Blanchard Seniors are lightly built. The planking is a scant 3/4 or so.

Another approach to repairing the split might be to run a small router down the split, to open it up a bit, and then fit and epoxy in a spline, made with a suitable piece of red cedar.

[There is, as they say, More Than One Way To Do It.]

Emmablue
10-21-2005, 08:22 PM
Thank you for all of the info. In the am I will begin to remove the pieces. I'll let you know how it goes.

pcford
10-21-2005, 11:44 PM
Must be something I am not understanding.

Why can't you put a doubler on it from the inside? Maybe 1/2 to 3/4 WO? No big deal.

Emmablue
10-22-2005, 01:01 AM
Tell me more.

pcford
10-22-2005, 02:04 AM
Tell me more. Assuming you don't have ceiling in the way, just cut a rectangular piece of white oak or good fir, seal it, bed the doubler in Dolphinite, fasten from the outside with #10 bronze screws, plug and paint the area. The paint patch will show but it will be not as noticeable as the busted plank.

Injecting glue into a crack never works for me. You have to really separate the sides of the crack like Mr. Smalser said. And if you are going to let the end of the plank at stem go, you might as well put in a new plank.

I don't know what the busted plank looks like, but most likely the above repair will work.

Emmablue
10-22-2005, 11:09 AM
What about all the ribs. This split is long.

Emmablue
10-26-2005, 07:45 PM
This repair job is not easy. I finally have the shear plank sprung for the length of the split. I don't think it had ever been removed. The sistered ribs only go up as far as the second plank so the rest of the planks are re-fastened. The shear was only fastened into the old ribs. I also found a partially rotten stem. The aft facing part just up in the forepeak. Also more rot along the top edge of the shear plank and the edge of the plywood deck. Lots of years of water leaking in at that joint behind the rub rail. Now I have a really big job and will need new wood for that plank. Wow!

Nicholas Carey
10-27-2005, 07:24 PM
Originally posted by Emmablue:
This repair job is not easy. I finally have the shear plank sprung for the length of the split. I don't think it had ever been removed. The sistered ribs only go up as far as the second plank so the rest of the planks are re-fastened. The shear was only fastened into the old ribs. I also found a partially rotten stem. The aft facing part just up in the forepeak. Also more rot along the top edge of the shear plank and the edge of the plywood deck. Lots of years of water leaking in at that joint behind the rub rail. Now I have a really big job and will need new wood for that plank. Wow!Ah...first law of fixing wooden boats — once you open it up, the project is alway larger than it seems :D

One other thing to take a look at while you're under the hood, so to speak: chainplates are a weak spot on the Blanchard Senior Knockabout.

The design has inboard chainplates and they often leak. Look for rot about the chainplates and near them, below decks.

You'll find, I think, that spiling a new plank isn't all that difficult. If you've never spiled a plank, get a copy of Robert Steward's Boatbuilding Manual, 4th ed.. It should set you on the right track.

good luck!

[ 10-27-2005, 08:24 PM: Message edited by: Nicholas Carey ]

Bob Smalser
10-27-2005, 11:10 PM
Check the other side while you're at it....and any other suspect areas where rainwater might leak in.

And save all the pieces you remove for patterns, and you'll never have to spile, scribe or tick stick anything original to the boat.

Emmablue
10-28-2005, 08:19 PM
Yes, I do plan on removing the other rub rail and then the deck to see what's really going on with the stem. That worries me alot. I'll let you know what I find. I am going to need ongoing advise I'm afraid. I'm no boat right but I am handy for an old woman.

Emmablue
10-28-2005, 08:24 PM
I forgot to say that the chain plates are a source of leakage too. I have my hands full but I am glad to see all of this...you just can't see it under all that shiney paint. She looked perfect!

Jay Greer
10-30-2005, 02:52 PM
I am out of town for six weeks on a special job. If you can hold tight that long, I would be happy to check out your problem. If not, contact Steve Chapin Boat Builder in the Point Hudson Marina, Port Townsend WA before cutting that plank.

Emmablue
11-01-2005, 09:32 PM
Well now both of my sanders have bit it. And my drill. 6 weeks shouldn't be a problem. I am slowly digging out plugs and wrestling with screws. I have exposed the top of the stem by cutting away a triangle of the plywood deck. The rot is not that low on the stem but is pretty bad where the first and second planks attach.