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View Full Version : Iranian nuclear program brought to you by.... Dick Cheney and Halliburton!



Bob Cleek
09-10-2006, 02:28 PM
Now THIS is disturbing!

According to journalist Jason Leopold, sources at Dick Cheney's former company, Halliburton, allege that as recently as January 2005, Halliburton sold key components for a nuclear reactor to an Iranian oil development company. Leopold says his Halliburton sources have intimate knowledge of the business dealings of both Halliburton and Oriental Oil Kish, one of Iran's largest private oil companies.

Halliburton has a long history of doing business in Iran, starting as early as 1995, when Vice President Cheney was chief executive of the company. In an attempt to curtail Halliburton and other U.S. companies from engaging in business dealings with rogue nations such as Libya, Iran and Syria, an amendment was approved in the Senate on July 26, 2005. The amendment, sponsored by Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, would penalize companies that continue to skirt U.S. law by setting up offshore subsidiaries as a way to legally conduct business and avoid U.S. sanctions under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act.

A letter, drafted by trade groups representing corporate executives, vehemently objected to the amendment, saying it would lead to further hatred and perhaps incite terrorist attacks on the United States and "greatly strain relations with the United States primary trading partners." The letter warned that "foreign governments view U.S. efforts to dictate their foreign and commercial policy as violations of sovereignty often leading them to adopt retaliatory measures more at odds with U.S goals."

According to Leopold, during a trip to the Middle East in March 1996, Dick Cheney told a group of mostly U.S. businessmen that Congress should ease sanctions in Iran and Libya to foster better relationships, a statement that, in hindsight, is completely hypocritical considering the Bush administration's foreign policy.

"Let me make a generalized statement about a trend I see in the U.S. Congress that I find disturbing, that applies not only with respect to the Iranian situation but a number of others as well," Cheney said. "I think we Americans sometimes make mistakes. . . . There seems to be an assumption that somehow we know what's best for everybody else and that we are going to use our economic clout to get everybody else to live the way we would like."

Cheney was the chief executive of Halliburton Corporation at the time he uttered those words. It was Cheney who directed Halliburton toward aggressive business dealings with Iran--in violation of U.S. law--in the mid 1990s, which continued through 2005 and is the reason Iran has the capability to enrich weapons-grade uranium.

It was Halliburton's secret sale of centrifuges to Iran that helped get the uranium enrichment program off the ground, according to a three-year investigation that includes interviews conducted with more than a dozen current and former Halliburton employees.

If the U.S. ends up engaged in a war with Iran in the future, Cheney and Halliburton will bear the brunt of the blame.

Source: "Halliburton Secretly Doing Business with Key Member of Iran's Nuclear Team," by Jason Leopold. GlobalResearch.ca, Aug. 5, 2005.

Memphis Mike
09-10-2006, 03:10 PM
Iran must have stopped doing business with Haliburtan.

I don't know what you find disturbing. Nothing this bunch does disturbs or surprises me anymore. They're the most crooked, corrupt administration in US history. Isn't it funny how they ran and convinced people to vote for them based on morality?

I think both Cheney and the Dubya would sell their own mothers into slavery if the price was right.

BrianW
09-10-2006, 05:42 PM
"Let me make a generalized statement about a trend I see in the U.S. Congress that I find disturbing, that applies not only with respect to the Iranian situation but a number of others as well," Cheney said. "I think we Americans sometimes make mistakes. . . . There seems to be an assumption that somehow we know what's best for everybody else and that we are going to use our economic clout to get everybody else to live the way we would like."

Those sound very much like sentiments I've seen posted here, by those suggesting alternate routes the US could have taken in dealing with the middle-east.

Any CEO is suppose to increase his companies profits. If done well, the shareholders and the employees benefit. To apply an 'amendment' (an amendment to what?) that went into effect in 2005, to a business transaction that happened 10 years prior, is absurd.


If the U.S. ends up engaged in a war with Iran in the future, Cheney and Halliburton will bear the brunt of the blame.

Yep, whoever is running Iran at the time would have nothing to do with it. That's some classic liberal reasoning there...

LeeG
09-10-2006, 05:59 PM
Imagine for a moment Cheney is the president and Bush was the VP.

It sure would look different ,,wouldn't be different but would look different.

BrianW
09-10-2006, 08:52 PM
Oyster,

I get closer to Haliburton every 2 weeks than most these guys do in a lifetime. But I don't know what they're selling overseas. ;)

Don't ya know this goes wayyyyy back...


Halliburton has a long history of doing business in Iran, starting as early as 1995

...a whopping 10 years. :D

Bob Cleek
09-11-2006, 02:53 AM
Here ya go, Erster... courtesy of Google:

Halliburton Secretly Doing Business with Key Member of Iran's Nuclear Team
by Jason Leopold

Scandal-plagued Halliburton, the oil services company once headed by Vice President Dick was secretly working with one of Iran’s top nuclear program officials on natural gas related projects and, allegedly, selling the officials' oil development company key components for a nuclear reactor, according to Halliburton sources with intimate knowledge into both companies’ business dealings.
Just last week a National Security Council report said Iran was a decade away from acquiring a nuclear bomb. That time frame could arguably have been significantly longer if Halliburton, which just reported a 284 percent increase in its fourth quarter profits due to its Iraq reconstruction contracts, was not actively providing the Iranian government with the financial means to build a nuclear weapon.

Now comes word that Halliburton, which has a long history of flouting U.S. law by conducting business with countries the Bush administration said has ties to terrorism, was working with Cyrus Nasseri, the vice chairman of the board of directors of Oriental Oil Kish, one of Iran’s largest private oil companies, on oil development projects in Tehran. Nasseri is also a key member of Iran’s nuclear development team.

“Nasseri, a senior Iranian diplomat negotiating with Europe over Iran's controversial nuclear program is at the heart of deals with US energy companies to develop the country's oil industry”, the Financial Times reported.

Nasseri was interrogated by Iranian authorities in late July for allegedly providing Halliburton with Iran’s nuclear secrets and accepting as much as $1 million in bribes from Halliburton, according to Iranian government officials.

It’s unclear whether Halliburton was privy to any of Iran’s nuclear activities. A company spokesperson did not return numerous calls for comment. A White House spokesperson also did not return calls for comment.

Oriental Oil Kish dealings with Halliburton became public knowledge in January when the company announced that it had subcontracted parts of the South Pars natural gas drilling project to Halliburton Products and Services, a subsidiary of Dallas-based Halliburton that is registered in the Cayman Islands.

Following the announcement, Halliburton announced the South Pars gas field project in Tehran would be its last project in Iran. The BBC reported that Halliburton, which took in $30-$40 million from its Iranian operations in 2003, "was winding down its work due to a poor business environment."

Halliburton, under mounting pressure from lawmakers in Washington, D.C., pulled out of its deal with Nasseri's company in May, but has done extensive work on other areas of the Iranian gas project and was still acting in an advisory capacity to Nasseri's company, two people who have knowledge of Halliburton's work in Iran said.

In attempt to curtail other U.S. companies from engaging in business dealings with rogue nations, the Senate approved legislation July 26 that would penalize companies that continue to skirt U.S. Law by setting up offshore subsidiaries as a way to legally conduct business in Libya, Iran and Syria, and avoid U.S. sanctions under International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA). The amendment, sponsored by Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, is part of the Senate Defense Authorization bill.

"It prevents U.S. corporations from creating a shell company somewhere else in order to do business with rogue, terror-sponsoring nations such as Syria and Iran," Collins said in a statement.

"The bottom line is that if a U.S. company is evading sanctions to do business with one of these countries, they are helping to prop up countries that support terrorism - most often aimed against America," she said.

The law currently doesn’t prohibit foreign subsidiaries from conducting business with rogue nations provided that the subsidiaries are truly independent of the parent company.

But Halliburton’s Cayman Island subsidiary never did fit that description.

Halliburton first started doing business in Iran as early as 1995, while Vice President Cheney was chief executive of the company and in possible violation of U.S. Sanctions According to a February 2001 report in the Wall Street Journal, "Halliburton Products & Services Ltd. works behind an unmarked door on the ninth floor of a new north Tehran tower block. A brochure declares that the company was registered in 1975 in the Cayman Islands, is based in the Persian Gulf sheikdom of Dubai and is "non-American." But, like the sign over the receptionist's head, the brochure bears the company's name and red emblem, and offers services from Halliburton units around the world." Moreover, mail sent to the company’s offices in Tehran and the Cayman Islands is forwarded to the company’s Dallas headquarters.

Not surprisingly, in a letter drafted by trade groups representing corporate executives vehemently objected to the amendment saying it would lead to further hatred and perhaps incite terrorist attacks on the U.S and “greatly strain relations with the United States’ primary trading partners.”

"Extraterritorial measures irritate relations with the very nations the U.S. must secure cooperation from to promote multilateral strategies to fight terrorism and to address other areas of mutual concern," said a letter signed by the Coalition for Employment through Exports, Emergency Coalition for American Trade, National Foreign Trade Council, USA Engage, U.S. Council on International Business and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. "Foreign governments view U.S. efforts to dictate their foreign and commercial policy as violations of sovereignty, often leading them to adopt retaliatory measures more at odds with U.S. goals.”

Still, Collins’ amendment has some holes. As Washington Times columnist Frank Gaffney pointed out in a July 25 story, “the Collins amendment would seek to penalize individuals or entities who evade IEEPA sanctions — if they are "subject to the jurisdiction of the United States."

“This is merely a restatement of existing regulations. The problem with this formulation is that, in the process of purportedly closing one loophole, it would appear to create new ones. As Sen. Collins told the Senate: "Some truly independent foreign subsidiaries are incorporated under the laws of the country in which they do business and are subject to that country's laws, to that legal jurisdiction. There is a great deal of difference between a corporation set up in a day, without any real employees or assets, and one that has been in existence for many years and that gets purchased, in part, by a U.S. firm. It is a safe bet that every foreign subsidiary of a U.S. Company doing business with terrorist states will claim it is one of the ones Sen. Collins would allow to continue enriching our enemies, not one prohibited from doing so.”

Going a step further, Dow Jones Newswires reported that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission sent letters in June to energy corporations demanding that the companies disclose in their security filings any business dealings with terrorist supporting nations.

“The letters have been sent by the SEC's Office of Global Security Risk, a special division that monitors companies with operations in Iran and other countries under U.S. Sanctions, which were created by the U.S. Congress in 2004,” Dow Jones reported.

The move comes as investors have become increasingly concerned that they may be unwillingly supporting terrorist activity. In the case of Halliburton, the New York City Comptroller's office threatened in March 2003 to pull its $23 million investment in the company if Halliburton continued to conduct business with Iran.

The SEC letters are aimed at forcing corporations to disclose their profits from business dealings rogue nations. Oil companies, such as Devon Energy Corp., ConocoPhillips, Marathon Oil Corp. and Occidental Petroleum Corp. that currently conduct business with countries that sponsor terrorism, have not disclosed the profits received from terrorist countries in their most recent quarterly reports because the companies don’t consider the earnings “material.”

Devon Energy was until recently conducting business in Syria. The company just sold its stake in an oil field there. ConocoPhillips has a service contract with the Syrian Petroleum Co. that expires on Dec. 31.

Jason Leopold is the author of the explosive memoir, News Junkie, to be released in the spring of 2006 by Process/Feral House Books. Visit Leopold's website at www.jasonleopold.com for updates.

© 2005 Jason Leopold

BrianW
09-11-2006, 03:08 AM
“Nasseri, a senior Iranian diplomat negotiating with Europe over Iran's controversial nuclear program is at the heart of deals with US energy companies to develop the country's oil industry”, the Financial Times reported.

Nasseri was interrogated by Iranian authorities in late July for allegedly providing Halliburton with Iran’s nuclear secrets and accepting as much as $1 million in bribes from Halliburton, according to Iranian government officials.

It’s unclear whether Halliburton was privy to any of Iran’s nuclear activities. A company spokesperson did not return numerous calls for comment. A White House spokesperson also did not return calls for comment.

Which way is this technology flowing again? :)

No mention of centrifuges in that article.

I can see several reasons for this Nasseri guy to stir the pot, it's not too hard.

Joe (SoCal)
09-11-2006, 06:16 AM
Hum, is George posting for you, Bob?;) For some reason, the far fetched direct linking of the two principles. seems not to be provided in your article. Being specific, with facts, backing up your wild hair claims, is becoming harder and harder each day around here for many folks. I wait with great anticipation for better information next login time.

Closer link than the one you bought into eh Oysta ? ;) :D

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid57/pb2dba766a6daefd4d49237912974028e/fc689a8e.jpg

I'm going to church this morning then put some time in at the Boat club and then possibly go for a nice sail if the winds are fair. What you gonna do today Oysta, hang around the forum and bitch ;)

formerlyknownasprince
09-11-2006, 06:27 AM
Didn't someone on this forum recently illegally import Cuban cigars via Mexico? Same issue - just a matter of degree. If war breaks out with Cuba - it'll be his fault........

Milo Christensen
09-11-2006, 07:07 AM
We need a new poll:

Which erster is worse:

1. The drunk, incomprehensible one in the evenings?

or

2. The hungover, incomprehensible one in the mornings?

or

3. Milo is too harsh on erster, who has obviously had a TIA or other brain altering event.

Joe (SoCal)
09-11-2006, 07:12 AM
Cigars what cigars? I traded them for some Nigerian yellow cake and some aluminum tubes. See the conection ? :D

Bob Cleek
09-11-2006, 03:49 PM
I didn't make this up. Check out the Washington Post:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A58298-2005Feb2.html

Or the Portland Independent Media Center (whoever they are?):

http://portland.indymedia.org/en/2005/08/322950.shtml

Or MSNBC/Newsweek (ever heard of them?):

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6982444/site/newsweek/

Not to leave out Al Jazeera, although I'll admit they're biased:

"Halliburton, the scandal-plagued oil company, that Vice President Dick Cheney used to run, sold an Iranian company key components for a nuclear reactor, Halliburton sources revealed."

http://www.aljazeera.com/cgi-bin/conspiracy_theory/fullstory.asp?id=244

Or the Center for Research on Globalization:

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=viewArticle&code=LEO20050805&articleId=806

And the NY Sun:

http://daily.nysun.com/Repository/getmailfiles.asp?Style=OliveXLib:ArticleToMail&Type=text/html&Path=NYS/2005/01/12&ID=Ar00103

And for a "fair and balanced" word from the other side of the issue, Radio Free Europe:

http://www.rferl.org/featuresarticle/2005/01/e0a0a332-1150-42d1-b235-9e7198c82059.html

And Fox News:

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,134836,00.html

This is one mess that Washington seems to be sweeping under the rug. (See the Radio Free Europe "spin.") Talk about "giving aid and comfort to the enemy!" I haven't seen anything like this we sold millions of tons of scrap metal to Japan just before WWII, only to have it delivered back to us at Pearl Harbor!

Keith Wilson
09-11-2006, 04:00 PM
plato told him:he couldn't
believe it(jesus

told him;he
wouldn't believe
it)lao

tsze
certainly told
him,and general
(yes

mam)
sherman;
and even
(believe it
or

not)you
told him:i told
him;we told him
(he didn't believe it,no

sir)it took
a nipponized bit of
the old sixth

avenue
el;in the top of his head:to tell

him

e. e. cummings

BrianW
09-11-2006, 04:28 PM
I didn't make this up. Check out the Washington Post:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A58298-2005Feb2.html

Checked out this article. No mention of centrifuges there.


Or the Portland Independent Media Center (whoever they are?):

Done. Weirdo site. They mentions some sale of equipment, but nothing to back it up or even specific. Not very credible.



Or MSNBC/Newsweek (ever heard of them?):) http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6982444/site/newsweek/


Heard of them?! That one anchorwoman on TV is hot! Anyhow, 3 pages of article, no mention of centrifuges or equipment sold to Iran.


Not to leave out Al Jazeera, although I'll admit they're biased:

"Halliburton, the scandal-plagued oil company, that Vice President Dick Cheney used to run, sold an Iranian company key components for a nuclear reactor, Halliburton sources revealed."

http://www.aljazeera.com/cgi-bin/conspiracy_theory/fullstory.asp?id=244

You quoted the one line that mentions nuke equipment on the whole article. Not very convencing gonna take more than some 'source.'


Or the Center for Research on Globalization:

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=viewArticle&code=LEO20050805&articleId=806

No nuke equipment here either.


And the NY Sun:

http://daily.nysun.com/Repository/getmailfiles.asp?Style=OliveXLib:ArticleToMail&Type=text/html&Path=NYS/2005/01/12&ID=Ar00103

Again, no nuke technogoly tranfer mentioned.


And for a "fair and balanced" word from the other side of the issue, Radio Free Europe:

http://www.rferl.org/featuresarticle/2005/01/e0a0a332-1150-42d1-b235-9e7198c82059.html

Check out this opening quote from that article...

The involvement of the U.S. company Halliburton in a project to develop oil fields in Iran could be part of the larger effort to convince Iran to abandon any nuclear-weapons program it might have. That's the opinion of analysts looking at a new and controversial deal involving Halliburton and Iranian companies.

Could be an interesting twist!


And Fox News:

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,134836,00.html

Gee, why am I not suprised... No mention of centrifuges there either.


This is one mess that Washington seems to be sweeping under the rug. (See the Radio Free Europe "spin.") Talk about "giving aid and comfort to the enemy!" I haven't seen anything like this we sold millions of tons of scrap metal to Japan just before WWII, only to have it delivered back to us at Pearl Harbor!

I don't know Bob... if I didn't have such a high opinion of you, I'd think you were trying to baffle us with bull****. Lot's of links, lot's of hype, but no substence in any of it.

BrianW
09-11-2006, 05:46 PM
Not much to follow up on. Some of the links are months old. Lot's of talk about Halliburton 'nearly' breaking some laws, depends on who's being interviewed.

Folks don't think going to war is the answer, and yet when a company makes headway in a 'enemy state', something which could being 2 countries closer without bloodshed, that's frowned upon too.

I don't know what it takes to make some folks happy. :)

Joe (SoCal)
09-11-2006, 05:46 PM
Milo, if you consider salt air and water to be a mind altering sustance, then yes I was drunk last night. I drank about ten hours of it over the weekend. :D And you? Got pictures to prove it, too.......

Wana see????? But first I must continue my intake some more around 11am. with the tide change. I hate the hangover upon sobering up. Later, gotta glue and catch some live bait.

Went sailing today myself. I always have photos :D

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid214/p6cec88080c650e8b70c2d18b55118662/ed0690ca.jpg

Great breeze today, look at Tidbit heal. ;)

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid214/pca1bf570fdb58694efd350f22852e8dc/ed069089.jpg

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid214/pedf6b12280d988dd209fc2599e1d4f3f/ed069049.jpg

So Oysta about those photos ya said you have ;)

BrianW
09-11-2006, 05:51 PM
Nice Joe!

Say, your not transporting any centrifuges are ya? :)

Joe (SoCal)
09-11-2006, 06:01 PM
Nice Joe!

Say, your not transporting any centrifuges are ya? :)

Nope but I did sail very close to West Point and there were lots of State Police marine division, and army boats circling around. ;)

Bob Cleek
09-11-2006, 09:37 PM
Well, I have to admit that I may have been hoodwinked by the centrifuges, which, upon careful reading, are less well documented than Haliburton's petroleum technology sales to Iran. What I did glean from the reports, however, is that it does appear that they have set up an offshore subsidiary to circumvent the US trade restrictions.

It has been going on for some time. The most recent documented sales to Iran were in 2005. This issue came to my attention while reading a piece in the paper about the ten most under-noticed (or concealed) news events of the year.

BUT WAIT! THERE'S MORE!

Halliburton Subsidiary to Build North Korea's First Light-Water Reactor

By Ion Zwitter, Avant News Editor
Pyongyang, North Korea, November 5, 2006

A jubilant U.S. State Department announced today that the Halliburton subsidiary of Buhn & Dogale, a small ceramic figurine manufacturing firm located in the Cayman Islands, has been granted a coveted $3.2 billion no-bid contract to construct North Korea's first light-water nuclear reactor. State Department spokesman Sean McCormack said key officials associated with the contract award, an important component of the recently signed North Korean Now You See Them Now You Don't Strategic Nuclear Arms Limitation Treaty, were "elated".

"We've all worked very hard over the past several years to put this agreement in place," said McCormack. "According to the terms of the treaty, we will provide funding, technical know-how, and construction capacity and infrastructure to build North Korea's light-water nuclear plant, in return for which North Korea will promise not to secretly build any more nuclear weapons and to destroy their current stockpile. Pyongyang has assured us they will begin to dismantle all of their existing nuclear capabilities as soon as the first spade hits the ground. They've been a little coy about telling us what those capabilities are, exactly, though."

Buhn & Dogale, which currently handles production coordination and billing for offshore sectors of the commemorative plate, teacup and religious figurine industry, boasts three full-time employees and an intern who comes in Thursdays after school. The corporation's headquarters is a large second-story Cayman Islands office suite decorated in a colorful "Island Swing" style.

Regarding the Bush Administration's choice of Buhn & Dogale, which has no previous experience in the construction or maintenance of nuclear facilities, some liberal skeptics suggested they may have been selected due to the company's close affiliation with Halliburton, an oil services conglomerate formerly run by vice president Dick Cheney and from which Cheney still receives six-figure annual remuneration.

"What's a ceramic figurine company doing winning a three billion dollar no-bid nuclear contract?" fumed House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi. "Why not just give the contract to my local veterinarian, or a horse show judge, or something?"

According to McCormack, the local veterinarian had already been tapped by Bush for the post of acting FDA Director and was therefore unavailable for the Pyongyang project.

"Besides," McCormack continued, "companies don't do anything in-house any more, anyway. Halliburton rarely, if ever, has in-house expertise for the projects for which they're granted no-bid contracts. They simply subcontract it out at a hefty profit. You know, it's not what you know, it's who. Maybe whom. Whom do you know, do you know who-- it's the American way, anyway."

Validating McCormack's point, Zingo Erroth, a spokesman for Buhn & Dogale, announced later in the day from his hammock that the company will be assigning the preliminary construction phase of the project to a group of over 3,000 unskilled laborers culled from the Walmart Corporation's confidential "inside agitator danger list".

"They don't seem to know a whole lot about nuclear reactors," said Erroth, "but they can handle shovels and don't appear to be too fazed by the risks associated with handling uranium. We'll be getting them fairly cheaply, too, excuse me, I spilled my Cuba Libre, as Walmart needs to get them out of the country before they get any further along organizing their union. The Waltons are even paying their transport to North Korea. One-way, but still."

Construction of the reactor, to be built in the South Hamgyong province of North Korea, is scheduled to commence in March, 2007, with completion estimated in the summer of 2010. The process will be broken into eight phases, at the end of each of which the North Korean head of state Kim Jong Il has promised to personally dismantle one nuclear warhead.

"We've worked out every detail except for the exact disposition of the phases," said an upbeat McCormack. "We think they should be distributed fairly equally throughout the entire construction process. Kim Jong Il, on the other hand, says the first phase is the building of the reactor, and the other seven are the leader's seven birthday celebrations following reactor start-up. I'm sure we'll find common ground soon."

westinghouse
09-12-2006, 06:19 AM
OMF'inG is it trolling season? 'Cause it smells like oyster in the bilge again. Yuck. Great shots, Joe! Interesting thread here, Mr.Cleek. I'm not sure about that Zwitter guy, posting from...Pyongyang? I'm missing something, for sure...

George.
09-12-2006, 06:53 AM
Closer link than the one you bought into eh Oysta ? ;) :D

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid57/pb2dba766a6daefd4d49237912974028e/fc689a8e.jpg



Nah. Oyster never bought that one. He might have, if it were spelled al-Gaeda. ;)