PDA

View Full Version : Dilemma: white oak ribs are 1 1/8" square ...



Ralph M Bohm
04-21-2003, 08:26 PM
... and If I am learning all of this correctly, 4/4 wood only an inch thick ...

Here's what I've got:

I am replacing the 1 1/8" square white oak ribs with new green. The existing ones are approximately 6 foot long with a pretty tight bend approx 4' from the keel.

What I would like to do is by some of this white oak perhaps some planks at whatever standard widths it comes in, that is green, has NOT been kiln dried, and will take a pretty hard bend.

1) Is there such a thing as 5/4 wood, particularly "green" white oak for bending?

2) If so, would this 5/4 wood be thick enough to cut 1 1/8" square ribs out of it?

Mrleft8
04-21-2003, 09:16 PM
Um....... Yes..... 5/4.... 6/4....8/4...... Go to your local saw mill and ask for 5/4 White oak. It's about as common as fleas on dogs....

Ralph M Bohm
04-21-2003, 09:32 PM
Originally posted by Mrleft8:
Um....... Yes..... 5/4.... 6/4....8/4...... Go to your local saw mill and ask for 5/4 White oak. It's about as common as fleas on dogs....I realised my question was a little dumb, but I had already posted and let the text fall where they may. tongue.gif

imported_Spissgatter W-9
04-21-2003, 10:05 PM
I know what you mean. I've reservations myself. Who wants to be belittled, berated or humilitated for asking an honest question? Ostensibly, the purpose of this particular forum is to impart knowledge and experience by by those who know to those who don't. Sadly, too much to expect.

Bruce Hooke
04-21-2003, 10:31 PM
Actually, if I wanted to be sure of getting 1 1/8" out of a green board I would probably get 6/4. However, to some degree it depends on the particular pile of lumber. If it is a strong (a bit more than) 5/4 and if the surface is pretty smooth then you might be able to get away with 5/4. Otherwise I would go to 6/4. Green lumber is generally quite cheap so the added cost should not be that signifcant. Make sure you find a place that has, and will let you pick out, nice straight-grained pieces. Bring your gloves and be prepared to dig through a stack of lumber to find what you need (and rebuild the stack when you are done).

FYI - Green lumber will almost certainly come in random widths.

Mrleft8
04-22-2003, 06:38 AM
I wasn't intending to belittle anyone if that's the way it "sounded". Imagine someone telling you they needed 4" boards, but all the 4" boards at the lumber yard were only 3 1/2" wide..... My answer would be.... " ;) Ummmmmm.... then get 5" wide boards...." Sometimes the most obvious answer is hidden behind a plate glass window.

Ralph M Bohm
04-22-2003, 07:18 AM
Originally posted by Mrleft8:
[QB]I wasn't intending to belittle anyone if that's the way it "sounded"... QB]No, not at all. ;)
I did not take any offense at all.

These last few posts have created another question:

Let's say I head out of Bangor, Maine where I live, and am passing through a particular location where a company that I found in say,Woodfinder (http://woodfinder.com/),
would have the wood I would need. I search through their wood pile and pick out that which I need. Then I proceed to Essex (Baltimore) with this wood, (this is where the sailboat is). Now, I will need a table saw to cut this wood down; perhaps even a planing machine to get this wood to the width I need.

So I suppose my question then would be:
Is there a mill somewhere along the way who (like in the old days) would cut my wood down for me?

Garrett Lowell
04-22-2003, 07:34 AM
I don't know about on the way, Ralph. But if you want to drive another 90 minutes south, I have both a table saw and a thicknesser, and I would be happy to give you a hand.

NormMessinger
04-22-2003, 07:47 AM
As indicated you loose dang near a quarter of an inch when the board is surfaced. So if you want 1-1/8" finished you will need at least 6/4 and than may be a scant 1/8 over an inch. Get rough sawn if you can and surface it your self.

ishmael
04-22-2003, 07:57 AM
Hi Ralph,

So, just so I'm clear, you live in Orono, but are restoring a boat outside of Baltimore? Good man!

Re having the stock milled, you should be able to find a shop somewhere close by the project that will mill it for a small fee. Look under cabinet and millwork shops in the phone book. Or...post a query here addressed to Baltimore area forumites. It's always nice to have a recommendation from someone on the ground. It's also possible that the mill sawing the logs will have the equipment.

I lived in those parts, years back, but the shop I worked at for a number of years has moved.

Best of luck,

Jack in S. Orrington

Ralph M Bohm
04-22-2003, 08:06 AM
Originally posted by Garrett Lowell:
I don't know about on the way, Ralph. But if you want to drive another 90 minutes south, I have both a table saw and a thicknesser, and I would be happy to give you a hand.Garrett,

You are truly a good man! smile.gif

Thank you very much for the offer. I will stay in touch and can work with you on how your schedule looks. My plan it to spend aproximately 1 month in Essex. I will camp out under Audax and work on her during the day. This work may begin as early as May 19th ot as late as June 2, but either way, I am planning on spending an entire month on her.
more details to follow. :)

Ralph M Bohm
04-22-2003, 08:14 AM
Originally posted by ishmael:
Hi Ralph,

So, just so I'm clear, you live in Orono, but are restoring a boat outside of Baltimore? Good man!Hello Jack! A neighbor! I have to tell you how this all came about; my co-workers here at the University of Maine are laughing at this whole adventure of mine.



Re having the stock milled, you should be able to find a shop somewhere close by the project that will mill it for a small fee. Look under cabinet and millwork shops in the phone book. Or...post a query here addressed to Baltimore area forumites. It's always nice to have a recommendation from someone on the ground. It's also possible that the mill sawing the logs will have the equipment.
I will most certainly leave no stone unturned. smile.gif



I lived in those parts, years back, but the shop I worked at for a number of years has moved.

Best of luck,

Jack in S. OrringtonThanks Jack! You are in Orrington? I pass through there when I visit Maine Maritime Academy, in preparation for beginning classes there next Fall!
By the way, any tips on where I can find green white oak and some Honduras mahogany as well?
What are your thoughts on Hamilton Marine for silicon bronze screws?

Dave Thibodeau
04-22-2003, 08:18 AM
Tony Chaplick runs a sawmill devoted to oak lumber which is located in Marbl;ehead Mass which is on your way south. Tony's phone number is 781-631-6501

Garrett Lowell
04-22-2003, 08:33 AM
OK Ralph. Both my thicknesser and tablesaw are portable, so I can come to you if there's 20A 120VAC available. Plus, I've never been to Essex.

Ralph M Bohm
04-22-2003, 10:43 AM
Originally posted by Dave Thibodeau:
Tony Chaplick runs a sawmill devoted to oak lumber which is located in Marbl;ehead Mass which is on your way south. Tony's phone number is 781-631-6501OK, I've taken the info down.

Venchka
04-22-2003, 11:48 AM
It sounds like a steam box might be useful.

Unless you are going for total accuracy in replacing parts of Audax, don't overlook black locust. Especially if you are putting the new frames in "green". Black locust moves a lot less than white oak. Or so the legend goes.

His name escapes me right now (at my age, DUH!), but isn't the Wood Guru of Woodenboat Magazine right there in Orono at the University?

Ralph M Bohm
04-22-2003, 12:20 PM
Originally posted by Venchka:
It sounds like a steam box might be useful.
I am getting ready to build one out of PVC, a Coleman campstove and 2 tea kettles! :)
I promise to take photos of the contraption.



Unless you are going for total accuracy in replacing parts of Audax, don't overlook black locust. Especially if you are putting the new frames in "green". Black locust moves a lot less than white oak. Or so the legend goes.I am open to suggestions but have begun to lean towrds origianlity as of late. If Locust is not too much more costly, and can offer superior performance, I will most certainly look into it.



His name escapes me right now (at my age, DUH!), but isn't the Wood Guru of Woodenboat Magazine right there in Orono at the University?Don't know who you might be referring to, but if you remember, let me know and I will stop in and meet him, and tell him you said "hi".

Venchka
04-22-2003, 12:59 PM
"Don't know who you might be referring to, but if you remember, let me know and I will stop in and meet him, and tell him you said "hi"."

I don't know the gentleman, I just read his column on wood in WoodenBoat magazine.

A search of the Index:

/Black locust:/ See Locust (wood):

/Jagels, Richard, author:/"The Bad and the Good--Hemlock and Black Locust," 171:84

/Locust (wood):/Black/commentary by Robert Thompson, 160:40

/Thompson, Robert, author:/"Native Treasure: The Beauty of Black Locust," 160:40

Richard Jagels. He teaches at the University. The article by Robert Thompson is good too. He lives in Vermont.

Just call me Marion the Librarian, another day closer to Launch Day.

RGM
04-22-2003, 03:26 PM
Ralph, sounds like you are headed in the right direction. And you are certainly getting alot of good advice and encouragement from the others. However, based on some of your posts, I've got to ask you something. How extensive is your collection of wood boat repair and construction reference materials? Do you possess copies of Steward's Boatbuilding Manual, How to Build a Wooden Boat by Bud McIntosh or Details of Classic Boat Construction by Larry Pardey? Just to mention a few. If you do have any of these that's great, if you don't, you really should consider checking them out (library?)Then perhaps purchasing the one(s) that you will most certainly value. Go with 6/4 as previously suggested. Good luck and have fun.

[ 04-22-2003, 04:28 PM: Message edited by: RGM ]

High C
04-22-2003, 06:50 PM
Originally posted by Garrett Lowell:
OK Ralph. Both my thicknesser and tablesaw are portable, so I can come to you if there's 20A 120VAC available. Plus, I've never been to Essex."thicknesser" I like it. :D So wouldn't the other tool be called a "ripper"?

You're a sport to help Ralph with this. I find the hunt for, and milling of rough lumber to be maybe the most exciting part of boat, or furniture building.

Ralph M Bohm
04-22-2003, 07:46 PM
Originally posted by High C:
[QUOTE]

You're a sport to help Ralph with this. I find the hunt for, and milling of rough lumber to be maybe the most exciting part of boat, or furniture building.And! If I am there for the wood selection, that will realy make me "bond" with her (Audax, that is). :)

High C
04-22-2003, 09:02 PM
Originally posted by Ralph M Bohm:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by High C:



You're a sport to help Ralph with this. I find the hunt for, and milling of rough lumber to be maybe the most exciting part of boat, or furniture building.And! If I am there for the wood selection, that will realy make me "bond" with her (Audax, that is). :)</font>You know Ralph, one of the funny little things I've always enjoyed doing with my wood boats, is getting scraps or little bits of wood from friend's boats to integrate into mine. Like if someone replaces a plank, I like to take the old plank and use the good part of it to make bungs to put into my boat. Sort of enriches the gene pool. smile.gif