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View Full Version : I'm Going to Become A Sailing Groupie!



Claudia
05-28-2006, 04:51 PM
I loved it! Never will I hesitate to go again. The fast movement when needed, a bit of learning, the wind , all of it was great....but I want to go faster:D This boat, Hunters Child ll wins every Sunday. I was told they came in 1st and 2nd one week. They passed the finish line and the other boats were so far behind that they want back to do the last leg of the race again and came back through the finish line.
Don't get me wrong, I used to love sitting and watching ballyhoo skip across the water waiting for that bill to come up, or be on the flats and see that dark spot in the water, and gently cast and work that one bonefish! A few years ago my boss at the time took a group of us fishing, he told me about 15 minutes out that he never saw anyone look as content and happy on a boat as I looked.
Pictures will follow in a day or two. I think my favorite will be the one I took of Margo chewing on a chicken leg and let her know that it would be the 1st to be posted on the WBF. Now we all know the look I got on that one.:D

Katherine
05-28-2006, 04:53 PM
Claudia, sounds like you had a great time, I'm jealous, LOL. As for the pic of Margo, I wouldn't ask for a raise for awhile.

Meerkat
05-28-2006, 04:53 PM
Speed kills ;)

Claudia
05-28-2006, 05:22 PM
Your right Meer, but years ago it sure came in handy when I had to work a double shift ;)

Meerkat
05-28-2006, 05:24 PM
:eek: :(

Sailing should be for pleasure, not some balls to the wall competition! That's what I meant about speed.

botebum
05-28-2006, 05:33 PM
That's sailing- It's like sex- you feel like you're going really fast while you're doing it. You can't wait to get where you're going. Once you get there you feel like you're stoned. You immediately want to do it again. Yup- that's sailing!

Doug

S/V Laura Ellen
05-28-2006, 05:43 PM
Sounds like we have a new sailor in our midst. Glad you enjoyed yourself.:)

Phillip Allen
05-28-2006, 05:45 PM
The first one is free...

mmd
05-28-2006, 07:24 PM
Oh God! Another sailing convert!

You know, don't you, that like recently born-again Christians, new sailors are utterly unbearable in their enthusiasm for their new-found source of personal joy. If you doubt me, just read Joe's sailing chronicles.

Good on yer - I'm so pleased that we have a new convert in the fold. "Born to Sail" or "Ragbags Rule" tattoos are next.... <grin>

Ken Hutchins
05-28-2006, 07:31 PM
Me thinks Margo wants to get you all trained for crewing on Sarah.;)

Claudia
05-28-2006, 07:34 PM
That is what me thinks, too:D She also has a smaller f********* boat she has been working on. I'll be the first to help crew either one but I have a lot of learning to do.

Ken Hutchins
05-28-2006, 07:42 PM
Some day you and Margo will also have to learn a bit about sailing a gaff rig.;) ;)

Meerkat
05-28-2006, 07:44 PM
Time for you to BYOB: Build Your Own Boat... ;)

S/V Laura Ellen
05-28-2006, 07:45 PM
Where was the race, how long, round the buoys or longer race, wind condition, wave height, what role did you play?

Claudia
05-28-2006, 08:24 PM
Allan, I refuse to answer any of the above questions on the grounds that it will show complete sailing ignorance on my part:D Margo can add the details tomorrow. My part was doing whatever I was told. ;) It was very calm, the seas were maybe two feet. What I did learn this evening is that I need to be out more often, I know this because my computer chair is rocking from side to side.:D

garland reese
05-28-2006, 09:24 PM
Glad to hear your first sailing adventure was a great experience. I've only sailed a few times, and it is the most fun I think I've ever had...... this on boats all under 22 feet. The most fun was aboard a 16 foot daysailer, out for a small time regatta.
Sailing really is a wonderful way to spend time on the water. The best way, perhaps.

Thanks for telling us of your day! And tell Miss Margo Hello!!

paladin
05-28-2006, 10:17 PM
glad to see thatcha done been bit by the bug.......and it gets better....waking up in a quiet cove, gently rocking on the tide, fresh air, good coffee, bacon frying...food tastes better....just a little noise from the halyards.....50's and 60's music in the background...flickering oil lamps or whale oil candles....just clear your head and let the mind wander.....

Concordia...41
05-29-2006, 05:39 AM
Ok, so maybe it was a late night at the YC for one of us…

But I’m gradually gathering my remaining alcohol sodden wits…

Claudia’s jobs included watching for traffic as we jockeyed pre-start, keeping her eye on the marks as they were set & then sighting the next one as we made a turn, and she ground the mainsheet traveler winch once.

Allen - offshore, five legs for performance class - information we were given was 5.4 miles, but that announcement may have been cruising class that just did the first three legs. We generally figured our course was about 8 miles. Wind forcast was 8-9 NNW clocking around to ENE, but we saw more than that - generally 12-14 - occasionally more, but clocking as predicted. Seas 1-2.

Ken - Put a gold star on your crystal ball for:



Me thinks Margo wants to get you all trained for crewing on Sarah.

All in all a great day on the water.

More about the drama, conflicts, protests, and pissing contests at the YC later. And of all things, they didn't have a bartender so not only was there an open bar, you made your own drinks. (May have contributed to the items in the first sentence.) Anyway, right now things are still a little hazy.

Feels like I'm down to two brain cells and one is giving the other CPR.

A nap may be in order...

rbgarr
05-29-2006, 05:53 AM
Claudia,

Those things that Margo said you did are some of the most important things necessary for racing well. Every boat needs someone to do those things... and not all do. It's called 'keeping your head out of the boat' and is a great way to get the big picture. Glad you had fun!

Now I've just got to get my boat in the water. :rolleyes:

Ian McColgin
05-29-2006, 06:10 AM
The big advantage of racing is that it gets people paying attention to sailing correctly - good sail trim, attention to wind and current, and all that.

People who only go out puddledunking with slack hallyards and over-sheeted jibs and a wake that meanders around the bay are just not getting the full pleasure their boat wants to give.

That said, while I fully approve of a high order of competition, I don't personally go in for obscenity laden shouting.

A little legerdemain, on the other hand, can spice things. At Edgartown Race Week in the Wianno one race we'd been splitting tacks with our hated rival all up the second weather leg. It's hard to see to leeward in Wiannos, so a polite call of, "Starboar!" is good. Perhaps followed up by, "Starboard! You c*$&#^&$(r!"

So, in the spirit of being helpful and acknowledging the other boat's right-of-way as we aimed for their bow us on port tack and them on starboard, I hailed them, "Larboard!"

They slammed a tack before they realized what I'd said and that they had the right.

They tried to protest under that sportsmanship rule but the Committee laughed them out.

Chris Coose
05-29-2006, 06:48 AM
Not sure I agree Ian. The last thing a racing skipper has in mind is to teach. Even if somebody is a quick study there is information important to a race that has very little to do with sailing fundamentals.
Imagine a race skipper placing the helm in the hands of a brand new person? Not gonna happen.
Pulling out a chart and explaining pilotage navigation?
Discussing navigational bouy placement and coding.
Weather and cloud formation?
Etc. etc.

I've witnessed newcomers get off race craft and never come back and I don't blame them. It is generally a hostile environment.

Waiting for the end of a sailing day to drink booze also indicates something is very wrong.

S/V Laura Ellen
05-29-2006, 07:55 AM
Teaching & learning is done in practice sessions. Typically what went wrong last race will be the fodder of the next practice session. The we will do it until we get it right drills can take the better part of a day for a novice crew.

There is no time during a race to have a polite conversation about the finer points of performance sailing.

geeman
05-29-2006, 10:53 AM
So ,its not a good time to teach sombody how to use the head if the boat has one?

Joe (SoCal)
05-29-2006, 11:00 AM
It's an ADDICTIVE sport ;)

Glad you had fun now you have to bring a camera and share your new addiction with us all ;)

Phillip Allen
05-29-2006, 12:41 PM
Sailig is simple..."the wind is comming from there <-- so we're going there-->"

capnharv
05-29-2006, 01:17 PM
From Chris:

"The last thing a racing skipper has in mind is to teach. Even if somebody is a quick study there is information important to a race that has very little to do with sailing fundamentals.
Imagine a race skipper placing the helm in the hands of a brand new person? Not gonna happen."

I beg to differ. I often sail with a green crew (some who have never been on a sailboat) and I never have a problem with them handling the sheets or helm. I enjoy teaching them the finer points of sail trim and right of way on the course. And I don't YELL. (It may help that I've been teaching sailing for a while).

The only times I take the helm in a race (assueming I'm not by myself) is at the start or when things get crowded.

And I even won a few races!

Harvey

Concordia...41
05-29-2006, 02:45 PM
Seconded. I know that I’m operating in a rarefied situation, but when the skipper I crew for hands out job assignments, each assignment comes with an explanation.

No, it's not a classroom situation where people study and discussion groups are formed, but folks generally come out because they want to learn and understand.

Not talking about professional stuff like the Volvo or AC, but for amature racing, a good boat is a boat where folks are comfortable - not intimidated, not yelled at, etc.

On the SR33 when Steve puts a “newbie” on the running backstays, he puts a few minutes into instruction and a few minutes into ‘theory’ – i.e. the IMPORTANCE of keeping tension on said running backstays, i.e. - here's what will happen if we loose the rig … And then we practice as many times as possible prior to the start.

When he asked Claudia to watch "The Line," we'd been around the committe boat a couple of times and I had given her the Monday Night Football example where the computer superimposes a yellow line for the first down and explained that she had to use her own imagation and "see" a yellow line between the committee boat and the starting buoy.

I don't know everything in the world, but do know that people don't want to be scared, intimiated, yelled at, or generally made to feel like crap.

But yeah, there are moments of tension. And yes, there are strings of expletives – often in new and interesting combinations ..

As an aside, I was working a “mainstream” job with one of the guys that crews occasionally. He didn’t realize I was behind him and let the f word fly, but the young man immediately noticed me and apologized profusely. Anyway, his supervisor also happened to step into the room about that time and proceeded to rip the kid a new you-know-what over the language thing. Finally, in self defense, the kid says, ‘She crews for _______, she’s heard the f word before!’

As if to prove his point, a few days later between switching boats, gear, people, etc., somehow the 135 ended up in the 110 bag. We were hauling butt out the cut, headsail (which we thought was the 110) all ready to go, and SHAZAM the big honking 135 comes out of the bag. To this day, the couple of minutes it took the skipper to get the sail down and the boat under control – of course the wind was gusting and blowing us down on the rocks (not to mention loosing time / hard to tell which is worse ) – hold what may be world record for combination expletives in random order…

But speaking of expletives: On corrected, we're the FIRST LOOSER by 2.20 … :mad: :o :mad: :(

The chart won't cut and paste, but the results are here: :(

http://www.sayc2000.com/ROC_Results.htm

Wild Wassa
05-29-2006, 02:53 PM
"I loved it! Never will I hesitate to go again."

Has the Skipper got you down for the next race? ... if not, then sort that one out quickly, keen crew learn quickly. There is nothing worse than wanting to race.

The race was called "The Race of the Century." That is very impressive! Which century?

Warren.

Concordia...41
05-29-2006, 02:59 PM
Warren - you can be assured she's on. On for the couple of races off shore, and then in the Fall we have a second round of beer can races and I'll have my little boat in then.

In a couple of years, the classic yacht circuit up the East Coast on Sarah :)

Yeah, as long as it's fun for her and she wants to, there's a spot aboard...

Tristan
05-29-2006, 03:10 PM
My son enjoyed racing the first few times, when the wind blew like the hammers of hell. Then they had a very calm, windless day. He decided he likes cruising better (along with swimming, beach combing, snorking, fishing, and all the things that go along with crusing).

bamamick
05-29-2006, 03:12 PM
the next set, gybe, rounding, etc. through with the crew. I do it all the time. By now they realise that I am doing it for MY benefit, not just theirs. I have never had a problem with talk on the boat as long as the talk is about the race. I can not stand jibberjabber on the boat and won't have it (my, don't I sound authoritative!), but I do like feedback.

Margo, you start doing that east coast classic thingee you need to keep some of us common people in mind, eh? I can still pull a line or grind a winch if I have to.

Mickey Lake

ishmael
05-29-2006, 03:42 PM
Claudia,

A really good primer that lays out the theory and logistics in short order: "The Craft of Sail." It's an adult picture book, and pictures really help in understanding how this works. Jan Adkins writings and drawings. It was out of print for awhile, but is back. It's a worthy book, even for the more seasoned, but especially for the beginner.

John B
05-29-2006, 04:04 PM
Thanks for saying it Ian.
Its about understanding capabilities and equipment. and fun. There's often something new happens that takes you unawares or is a surprise. We generally don't have yelling either and we shift around depending on strengths and on the day performance. Hand over when tired.
I usually share on the wind helming and jib trimming and get onto brace when running but we cycle around.
Having said all that.. last race of the feb regatta 'they' took me off the helm and sent me to check out the topsail trim......evidently I was getting ratty after a bad windshift and being blanketed by an apartment block aka a 60ft S and S

S/V Laura Ellen
05-29-2006, 04:12 PM
So ,its not a good time to teach sombody how to use the head if the boat has one?

Tell them to hold it until the race is over!:D

Meerkat
05-29-2006, 05:53 PM
Books are good for summarizing things, but if you want to know sailing, the only thing you can do is sail! :)

Start saving your pennies and looking around for a little marconi sloop. Shouldn't be a huge problem in Florida, and I'm sure Margo can help.

Once you've got her (the boat, not Margo! ;)), go sailing just as often as you can. Make sure you've got a PFD and be sensitive to the weather. It's really not that hard to get the hang of, although it's a lifetime to really master.

There is nothing, no, not anything, quite so fine as Messing Around In (sail) Boats! :)

paladin
05-29-2006, 05:54 PM
WOODEN Sailboats, Meer......:D

Meerkat
05-29-2006, 05:59 PM
A boat is a boat is a boat, as long as it's a sailboat! ;)

Let her get the hang of sailing before she has to worry about gribbles! ;)

Concordia...41
05-29-2006, 06:12 PM
And she honestly has no clue as to gronicles and correct polarity / orientation. We'll leave that 'til later.

George Jung
05-29-2006, 06:37 PM
Show her the primer.... I believe it's somewhere here in the bilge...

John B
05-29-2006, 06:44 PM
You risk scaring her away from boating all together with a topic as complex as that. Let her get through the simple subjects... CLR/CLP, displacement and lead. Prismatic coefficients and celestial navigation ,and then let her ease into the whole subject of gronicles.

Concordia...41
05-29-2006, 07:06 PM
George - I think it's B&R, but John is right. Baby steps...

John B
05-29-2006, 07:10 PM
I just hate it when people say in two words what it takes me a paragraph to mumble out.:D

Ken Hutchins
05-29-2006, 07:14 PM
Margo, did you at least teach her to look at a nav chart to make sure the planned course has sufficient water before sitting on the bucket?:D

Wild Dingo
05-30-2006, 06:30 AM
I just hate it when people say in two words what it takes me a paragraph to mumble out

So try it when it happens after youve spent an eon writtin a massive to tome of information and some flamin sod comes along and in one single friggin sentance covers everything you took ages to say!!! :rolleyes: flaminmongrelgronicalhandicappedclodhopppinedjooma katedsods! :mad:

Aaahhh but be ye welcome to the madcapped world of "ragbaggers united" dear young thing miss Claudia me dear... welcome! and you do know of course that no matter where yer wander around this fine onion we dwell upon you will have the welcomin arms of fellow RU members to cuddle up with to snuggle in with to rest in and finally to sail with!! We're everywhere!!! :D

Man I hope Im able to make it to St Augustine Florida to partake of the beautilishus wonderous joys of bein with Sarah and Margo :cool: But I still gotta get to Nooo Zedlans an have a muckabout with Waione and other such fine sheep chuckers from the land of the great white cloud

Wild Dingo
05-30-2006, 06:30 AM
I just hate it when people say in two words what it takes me a paragraph to mumble out

So try it when it happens after youve spent an eon writtin a massive to tome of information and some flamin sod comes along and in one single friggin sentance covers everything you took ages to say!!! :rolleyes:
flaminmongrelgronicalhandicappedclodhopppinedjooma katedsods! :mad:

Aaahhh but be ye welcome to the madcapped world of "ragbaggers united" dear young thing miss Claudia me dear... welcome! and you do know of course that no matter where yer wander around this fine onion we dwell upon you will have the welcomin arms of fellow RU members to cuddle up with to snuggle in with to rest in and finally to sail with!! We're everywhere!!! :D

Man I hope Im able to make it to St Augustine Florida to partake of the beautilishus wonderous joys of bein with Sarah and Margo :cool: But I still gotta get to Nooo Zedlans an have a muckabout with Waione and other such fine sheep chuckers as Johnno the B up there from the land of the great white cloud

John B
05-30-2006, 04:57 PM
So you're back are you Dingo.. like a verbal swahili tornado .:D X 2 as well. LOL.

Should warm the place up a bit.

crawdaddyjim50
05-30-2006, 06:00 PM
Sorry, But if you had gronicles you would not be as smokin in your fishing outfit. I personally think they are overvalued.

Is that boat at the inlet? I think I remember seeing it the other day when my brother and I were in the ICW.

Wild Dingo
05-30-2006, 08:45 PM
So you're back are you Dingo.. like a verbal swahili tornado .:D X 2 as well. LOL.

Should warm the place up a bit.

A verbal swahili tornado??? HAHAHAHAHAA well said me ol sheepchucker mate... I like it! ;)

As for warm... weelll the temp out there was everyday a nice toasty 40+ C... evenings averaged 27C and it was UNBELIEVABLY beautiful :cool: Mind you down the hole the temp reached a totally in need of aircon 50+!!! yowsers!! was it warm down there by gar!!

In my first week and a half I saw 2 wild dingos about 100 death adders around the camp :eek: and many more bungarras! beautifull... mind you I didnt see... a single sunset or a single sun rise which gave me serious issues with their start and finish times!! ruddy inconsiderate mongrels!!

was given a few days reprieve as they try to sort out rosters for us underground water truck drivers... mind you I have some serious issues with this as well since its the wettest mine Ive ever seen I mean its right under Lake Big and has 3 dams right next to it!!! figgin decline literally runs with water the backs are like sprays from a jetskeet and the bottom of the decline is reminscent of a tropical rainforest!!!... yet they send me down the hole with a bloody great truck to SPRAY WATER!!! friggin amazing :rolleyes:

Johnno me ol cobblerone Im gonna HAVE to get my bum over there on one of me weeks off... just get of the plane and onto another to NZ and take your baby... ahem Waione that is not the missus!! HA!!... for a jaunt.. hey!!! mate your welcome to come along too if you want no worries but if your busy dont mind me okay?

ooops sorry Claudia me sweet girl... must watch that hyjackin caper eh?! I was just thinkin... yeah yeah I gotta stop that I know... anyways if your gonna be a sailin groupie Im just gonna have to hurry meself up and get me schooner done builded eh!! buggar bein a rock star with their groupies I wanna be a sailor with your sort as me groupies!!... ahem back to it peoples!!

Claudia
05-30-2006, 09:16 PM
Wild Dingo, I read everything you write in any area of the Forum and enjoy each word. You are so very welcomed to jump on any of my threads and write about whatever you please:)