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huisjen
05-12-2006, 01:09 PM
...And falling. Now how does he compare with Nixon?

Dan

John of Phoenix
05-12-2006, 01:11 PM
Now how does he compare with Nixon?

Pretty well - unfortunately.


The Voice of America is going to get their license pulled if they keep this up.
http://www.voanews.com/english/images/tv_approval-rating.jpg

PatCox
05-12-2006, 01:27 PM
Nixon was at 27 when he resigned.

huisjen
05-12-2006, 01:35 PM
I thought I heard on the radio that he's supposed to put his foot in his mouth tonight with some immigration reform speech, spelling out more details that someone is bound not to like.

Dan

Another One
05-12-2006, 04:25 PM
May 12th, 2006 12:41 am
Bush’s Approval Rating Drops


Wall Street Journal (http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2006/05/11/bushs-approval-ratings/)
President Bush’s job-approval rating has fallen to its lowest mark of his presidency, according to a new Harris Interactive poll. Of 1,003 U.S. adults surveyed in a telephone poll, 29% think Mr. Bush is doing an “excellent or pretty good” job as president, down from 35% in April and significantly lower than 43% in January.
Roughly one-quarter of U.S. adults say “things in the country are going in the right direction,” while 69% say “things have pretty seriously gotten off on the wrong track.” This trend has declined every month since January, when 33% said the nation was heading in the right direction. Iraq remains a key concern for the general public, as 28% of Americans said they consider Iraq to be one of the top two most important issues the government should address, up from 23% in April. The immigration debate also prompted 16% of Americans to consider it a top issue, down from 19% last month, but still sharply higher from 4% in March.
The Harris poll comes two days after a downbeat assessement of Bush in a New York Times/CBS News poll. The Times, in analyzing the results, said “Americans have a bleaker view of the country’s direction than at any time in more than two decades.”

Chris Coose
05-12-2006, 04:25 PM
No comparison to RMN.

Nixon didn't have stings attached to body parts and his head wasn't solid wood.

Another One
05-12-2006, 04:27 PM
Kinda sad, when "Tricky Dicky" represents the good old days.

Chris Coose
05-12-2006, 04:31 PM
Cripes! RMN represents real white house integrity compared to this dangerous incompetant.

High C
05-12-2006, 04:36 PM
Cripes! RMN represents real white house integrity compared to this dangerous incompetant.

As spoken by a Clinton supporter! :rolleyes:

Peter Malcolm Jardine
05-12-2006, 04:49 PM
Clinton was well respected around the world as a statesman. No on outside of the US respects your current president. They may be polite, but he's not liked at all.

jake1.11
05-12-2006, 05:13 PM
I'd be curious to know the particulars of the poll. Polls dont mean much if you dont know exactly what question was asked and the demographics of who was polled. In our society today it seems to be popular to bash president bush, so with all the media on the hunt the number by itseld means nothing.

JimD
05-12-2006, 05:16 PM
So just where do you find 29 out of 100 people like that???

jake1.11
05-12-2006, 05:21 PM
Like what?

JimD
05-12-2006, 05:24 PM
Like what thinks Bush is doing a good job.

jake1.11
05-12-2006, 05:28 PM
I think that he is doing the job that he was elected to do. Are you implying that everything is President Bush's fault. Last time I checked this country was based upon a democracy where no one person had that kind of power. There is this bunch of people there in Washington that have a hell of a lot more power than the president...they are called congress. Ask that same bunch of people if they think congress is doing a good job and I think you will get similar numbers.

JimD
05-12-2006, 05:37 PM
I'm implying that America hired a buffoon for the most symbolically important job in the country. A man who has publicly stated that catching a bass on a fishing trip was his finest moment as president. I'm inclined to agree with him on that one.

jake1.11
05-12-2006, 05:57 PM
Wow, that is pretty strong language. Is there any particular reason you consider him to be un-educated and stupid?
At any rate, if you dont like him, speak to your congressman, vote at the next election and rely upon our democratic system to elect the person that the country decides upon.

JimD
05-12-2006, 06:15 PM
This is fun reading:

http://www.crikey.com.au/articles/2003/12/03-0004.html

BTW, I don't have a congressman. I'm not an American but rather a citizen of your freindly neighbour to the north.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
05-12-2006, 07:48 PM
Jake, this is a guy who thought the Prime Minister of Canada was Prime Minister Poutine. That's catastrophically dumb.

Meerkat
05-12-2006, 07:53 PM
Wow, that is pretty strong language. Is there any particular reason you consider him to be un-educated and stupid?
At any rate, if you dont like him, speak to your congressman, vote at the next election and rely upon our democratic system to elect the person that the country decides upon.
I thought we now elect whoever the Rips tell DiBold to set the voting machine totals for?

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
05-12-2006, 08:39 PM
http://www.buckfush.com/images/George_Bush_Reign_Man.jpg

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
05-12-2006, 08:44 PM
http://koti.mbnet.fi/timebomb/Nixon_and_Elvis.jpg

Mrleft8
05-12-2006, 09:52 PM
Clinton was well respected around the world as a statesman. No on outside of the US respects your current president. They may be polite, but he's not liked at all.
A majority of americans polled this week find Clinton: A. More honest, and trustworthy. B. Better on taxes. C. Better with domestic policy. D. Better with homeland security. E. more competent dealing with natural disasters...... That should send the cleaning bills in the Congress soaring this weekend.....

JimD
05-13-2006, 04:46 AM
I still say Bill inhaled :D

LeeG
05-13-2006, 06:58 AM
let's blame it on immigration

Tristan
05-13-2006, 07:09 AM
Any man who would turn on to an offered BJ from a much younger, fairly attractive bimbo is OK in my book. His only shortcoming (no pun intended) was that he failed to say, "Hell yes, she blew me, and I really loved it!" Hey, we ALL inhaled!

Nick Scheuer
05-13-2006, 07:14 AM
I knew back when Bush's approval ratings went below 50% that something under 30% was only a matter of time.

Reason? Remember when I was using the word "hubris" to describe Bush and his henchpeople? I just goes with the teritory.

And we have people talking about a "Bush Dynasty" when we ought to be ROTFLOAO.

Moby Nick

High C
05-13-2006, 09:01 AM
Poll numbers are but a direct reflection of what is being reported in the media, always have been.

The real poll comes every two years. For the last decade plus, you guys have always been surprised at those results.

Maybe you're looking at the wrong polls. Don't fall for your own BS.

ken mcclure
05-13-2006, 09:14 AM
Don't worry. The numbers will come back up when a nuclear exchange starts in Iran.

LeeG
05-13-2006, 09:22 AM
what did Colbert say?,,polls are just a reflection of what the voters think,,and we know what a liberal bias the reality based polls have. er,,somehting to that effect.

ok,,taking bets, IF a war doesn't happen with Iran will Roves indictment affect that 29% or is that a firm bottom? I think that would be good for 2% drop.

Nick Scheuer
05-13-2006, 01:20 PM
Bombs in Iran will eliminate most of the 29% of the support Bush still has at this point.

Some of our "allies" might even side against us.

Moby Nick

ken mcclure
05-13-2006, 03:00 PM
Nick, it all depends on who bombs first. If Iran nukes Isreal, we'll be forgetting about the polls and heading for the poles.

High C
05-13-2006, 04:46 PM
Bombs in Iran will eliminate most of the 29% of the support Bush still has at this point.

Some of our "allies" might even side against us.

Moby Nick

Strongly disagree. Though they may posture and fume with false indignation, our "allies" are quietly relieved when we take care of these messes so they don't have to.

Nick Scheuer
05-13-2006, 05:17 PM
Anyone know how to use the word "bully" in a sentence?

Moby Nick

Meerkat
05-13-2006, 06:22 PM
"He spoke from the bully pulpit"

"That man is a bully."

"Bully for you!"

TomF
05-13-2006, 08:23 PM
Strongly disagree. Though they may posture and fume with false indignation, our "allies" are quietly relieved when we take care of these messes so they don't have to.Not all of 'em. Some messes, sure ... but not the ones you create.

Iraq was not a mess in need of internationals coming around to do cleaning up ... at least, no more so than many other grubby dictatorships we could all name. Iran falls into the same category.

t.

LeeG
05-13-2006, 10:26 PM
High,speaking of messes, how's New Orleans getting along? Are we cleaning it up ok?

Peter Malcolm Jardine
05-13-2006, 10:51 PM
What happens when Bush's popularity reaches 0%? Do you guys get a free lunch?

A get out of jail free card?
A ride on the Reading Railroad?

High C
05-14-2006, 12:02 AM
...Iraq was not a mess in need of internationals coming around to do cleaning up ...

:D Tell that to the UN! They were in an absolute tizzy over Iraq for a decade. :eek:

High C
05-14-2006, 12:05 AM
High,speaking of messes, how's New Orleans getting along? Are we cleaning it up ok?

What chu mean, we?

And no, it's not being cleaned up much at all. I'd say it's dying and rotting away rather quickly. Current population is about a fourth of what it used to be, and there are few signs of regrowth.

PeterSibley
05-14-2006, 02:32 AM
I hate to say it C and no slander to either side of politiks in the US...but what the hell is going wrong ??? The place is/was an icon...is it the whole governmental system? who ?

JimD
05-14-2006, 05:26 AM
our "allies" are quietly relieved when we take care of these messes so they don't have to.

I'm having a hard time thinking of anything Bush has done that has left me quietly relieved.

Nick Scheuer
05-14-2006, 07:36 AM
anything deeper than a "sound bite".

I overheard a radio talk show host (one who leans a bit Liberal) propose the other day that ALL politicians be dismissed and that we "start over". This sort of obserbation may be good for a laugh at a cocktail party, but to devote an entire afternoon of radio time?

Anbother factor is that it's been a long time since the US has experienced a Congressional Majority on the same side as the Executive branch. Couple this with an inferior President who has a Vice President whose primary objective is to increase the power of the Executive Branch; well, let's just say that neither of them are King Soloman.

Moby Nick

High C
05-14-2006, 08:17 AM
I hate to say it C and no slander to either side of politiks in the US...but what the hell is going wrong ??? The place is/was an icon...is it the whole governmental system? who ?

Peter, it's a combination of things, the least of which is politics. It's the overwhelming scale of the damage, the incompetence and helplessness of local government, and the damage done to barrier marshlands by leveeing the Mississippi River.

When the River was leveed, the natural process of annual silting during flood season came to a halt, so when hurricanes came along and caused errosion, that lost marsh was no longer replinished by silt from upstream.

This has gradually put the Gulf of Mexico 50 miles closer to the city, making her levee system all the more critical, and inadequate.

Fear of this newly realized physical threat has a lot of people paralyzed, afraid to rebuild, understandably afraid to commit to a city which may be washed away.

There is great affort underway to get the Federal government to allow Louisiana the same share of offshore oil revenue that other states enjoy, to raise the money necessary to repair both the damaged marshes, and to improve the city's levee system. Most states get around half of the money raised by drilling off their coasts, but Louisiana gets none. How that came to be is a long story, but we are working hard to rectify it.

Lacking the ability to repair the damage done to our coastline by the leveeing of the Mississippi River, I imagine New Orleans will not recover to any great extent.

huisjen
05-14-2006, 08:37 AM
Plus the fact that the ground there is slowly sinking. It's not as fast as shrub's populartiy, but it's just as certain.

Dan

High C
05-14-2006, 08:43 AM
Plus the fact that the ground there is slowly sinking. ...

Yep, that, too...

S/V Laura Ellen
05-14-2006, 08:48 AM
Strongly disagree. Though they may posture and fume with false indignation, our "allies" are quietly relieved when we take care of these messes so they don't have to.

I, as a citizen of an Allied country don't agree. I'm not relieved, scared maybe..., but not relieved.

Your allies will probably be in Iraq helping to hold things together long after the US has moved on to your next effort to spread your version of democracy"

High C
05-14-2006, 09:28 AM
I, as a citizen of an Allied country don't agree. I'm not relieved, scared maybe..., but not relieved.

Your allies will probably be in Iraq helping to hold things together long after the US has moved on to your next effort to spread your version of democracy"

I'm not talking about the unwashed masses. I'm talking about the folks who run the show. They're damn glad they don't have to do the heavy lifting. :rolleyes:

S/V Laura Ellen
05-14-2006, 09:52 AM
Have you (or the folks that run the show) asked them? You may have a US centric view on how your allies view the US contribution to world democracy.

How many Americans thought that the US military would be universally greeted as liberators by Iraq? Didn't turn out to be the love fest that was expected by some.

geeman
05-14-2006, 09:55 AM
I expected it to turn out roughly about how it has up to this point,,,,,,,

High C
05-14-2006, 10:04 AM
...How many Americans thought that the US military would be universally greeted as liberators by Iraq? Didn't turn out to be the love fest that was expected by some.

We were greeted as liberators, despite history revisionism which says otherwise. I saw it on television. I suspect you did as well.

And it wasn't just the US military that was greeted warmly, it was a broad coalition of nations which were acting on what was universally believed to be certain knowledge of a legitimate threat.

And now the whole thing was just the creation of the bad old US of A?
:rolleyes: What a crock. :rolleyes:

TomF
05-14-2006, 10:13 AM
Yes, greeted as liberators by some. Yes, we saw it on TV.

Neville Watson, an Australian peace activist, saw it first hand, in Baghdad. Want to hear his opinion?


ALAN SUNDERLAND: Reverend Watson, welcome to Insight. You were in Baghdad right through the bombing, the arrival of the coalition troops. So tell me, what are we to make of the scenes of Iraqi jubilation on the streets that we've been seeing here?
NEVILLE WATSON, PEACE ACTIVIST: Well, there certainly was some jubilation, but I certainly wouldn't go along with that presented by television. The one that I've seen a lot of since I've been back is the toppling of the statue of Saddam and I can hardly believe it was the same one that I saw, because it happened at only about 300m from where I was and it was a very small crowd. The rest of the square was almost empty, and when we inquired as to where the crowd came from, it was from Saddam City. In other words, it was a rent-a-crowd. Now, that piece of television has been played over and over again, but I've seen nothing of the pieces of television, for example, what happened in Mosul the other day, where the Americans opened fire on a crowd killing 10 and injuring 100 when it became anti-American. So I think the scenes of jubilation have to be balanced against the other side of the picture.
The full interview's at http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article3024.htm (http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article3024.htm), and frankly, it's fairly balanced. But no, High C, I expect that you didn't see it on television - certainly not on Fox or CNN.

geeman
05-14-2006, 10:16 AM
We were greeted warmly,,what I'm saying is ,,that anyone that thought it would be as easy as just going in and catchin the bad guy then waltzing out wasnt living in the real world.I knew it would take years to get done.The public now days tho is used to short wars one or two battles and its all over.When it gets down to the nitty gritty,as time goes on we tend to grow tired of hearing it,,,,and just want it to stop.At least thats my take on the US public attitude now anyway.

Joe (SoCal)
05-14-2006, 10:18 AM
We were greeted as liberators, despite history revisionism which says otherwise. I saw it on television. I suspect you did as well.

And it wasn't just the US military that was greeted warmly, it was a broad coalition of nations which were acting on what was universally believed to be certain knowledge of a legitimate threat.

And now the whole thing was just the creation of the bad old US of A?
:rolleyes: What a crock. :rolleyes:

Nope:eek:

What a pitcher of Kool-Aid you've been drinking. MAN O MAN HiC you are the MOST brainwashed neocon I have EVER EVER EVER seen.

You honestly trust FOX NEWS ??????
I saw it on television. I suspect you did as well. or any thing your are allowed to see on TV you Trust TV ?????? I cant even express to you how moronic that whole statement is. I give up live in your dream world keep the Kool Aid cold, stay the corse, why change horses mid apocalypse.


http://www.silverbulletcomicbooks.com/rage/images/050401/koolaidman.jpg

geeman
05-14-2006, 10:22 AM
HEY JOE!!!!!!!! what would you think of having that picture blown up and added on to your sail on Tidbit lol

Joe (SoCal)
05-14-2006, 10:30 AM
HEY JOE!!!!!!!! what would you think of having that picture blown up and added on to your sail on Tidbit lol

Only if I was sailing down in Sidel LA ;)

geeman
05-14-2006, 11:51 AM
Gotta admit tho,,the guys at the dock would just love you comin in with THAT on your sail lol

Memphis Mike
05-14-2006, 12:15 PM
I've noticed, that for the most part, all of the Dubya stickers on the backs of cars are gone with the exception of the Hummer and Lexus, etc.

I'd venture to say that the 29% that are still holding on are the rich fat cats that are still filling their pockets at the expense of the rest of the country.

Osborne Russell
05-14-2006, 12:30 PM
You can fool all of the people some of the time
You can fool some of the people all of the time
But you can't fool all of the people all of the time.

bjmullins
05-14-2006, 12:31 PM
I'm implying that America hired a buffoon for the most symbolically important job in the country. A man who has publicly stated that catching a bass on a fishing trip was his finest moment as president. I'm inclined to agree with him on that one.

I think it was a perch.:p

High C
05-14-2006, 12:34 PM
Yes, greeted as liberators by some. Yes, we saw it on TV.

Neville Watson, an Australian peace activist, saw it first hand...

OK, a peace activist, whatever that is, disagrees. I can live with that. :p :D

geeman
05-14-2006, 12:50 PM
Yes I'd definitely say he was unbiased ,,,wouldnt you?

S/V Laura Ellen
05-14-2006, 01:45 PM
We were greeted warmly,,what I'm saying is ,,that anyone that thought it would be as easy as just going in and catchin the bad guy then waltzing out wasnt living in the real world.I knew it would take years to get done.The public now days tho is used to short wars one or two battles and its all over.When it gets down to the nitty gritty,as time goes on we tend to grow tired of hearing it,,,,and just want it to stop.At least thats my take on the US public attitude now anyway.

I assume that the "anyone" you refer to is Dubya. Just what world does Dubya live in?

LeeG
05-14-2006, 06:30 PM
What chu mean, we?

And no, it's not being cleaned up much at all. I'd say it's dying and rotting away rather quickly. Current population is about a fourth of what it used to be, and there are few signs of regrowth.

High, that's what I mean,,our ability to clean up and reconstruct New Orleans is many times greater than our abilty to "clean up other peoples messes" as you put it. My brother and ex say a similar thing as you do.

You've got some romantic images about the coalition. After the US there was our ally KBR, Blackwater, Triple Canopy etc. THEN the British, etc.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
05-14-2006, 06:47 PM
"our "allies" are quietly relieved when we take care of these messes so they don't have to."


Yep, last night I quietly relieved myself on the front lawn when I let the dog out. I'm glad Dubya wasn't there to help. It wouldn't be right.

LeeG
05-14-2006, 08:32 PM
Strongly disagree. Though they may posture and fume with false indignation, our "allies" are quietly relieved when we take care of these messes so they don't have to.



this mess is our making. Our king , George the Hard Worker, says that when they stand up we'll stand down. Oh yeah.

http://news.independent.co.uk/world/middle_east/article447806.ece

A gun battle between two units of the Iraqi army has left one soldier and a civilian dead, underlining how ethnic and sectarian divisions are crippling the US-trained force.

Meerkat
05-14-2006, 08:41 PM
George Washington was right about foreign entanglements.

PeterSibley
05-15-2006, 02:12 AM
OK, a peace activist, whatever that is, disagrees. I can live with that. :p :D

This ,I take it makes you a war activist ?? or at least an apologist ....I prefer the words of those who aren't making a buck out of the deal...or running for office

Chris Coose
05-15-2006, 05:39 AM
OK, a peace activist, whatever that is, ........

You know exactly what a peace activist is. It is the crew whom you blame the loss of your ****ty little wars and will include this one.

All American war activists think they have to do is aim and shoot. They got the wrong target and the wrong amo on this one and they will blame everybody but themselves due to their ignorance.

29% means we've got 3 in 10 who believe dubbya is OK. That is the problem here.

TomF
05-15-2006, 06:52 AM
High C, what part of his eyewitness account of the hauling down of Saddam's statue do you dispute? Does the fact that a "peace activist" saw a small crowd in the square that day somehow make that crowd bigger?

Ever notice when you crop a photo, suddenly the subject matter fills the frame, where before it looked rather smaller and less significant? And it rather changes the story the picture tells? You think that network media pros don't know that too?

Amazing.

High C
05-15-2006, 08:19 AM
High C, what part of his eyewitness account of the hauling down of Saddam's statue do you dispute? ....

Tom, the very fact that he calls himself a "peace activist" makes his words suspect. He's there with an ax to grind, with a predetermined perspective.

TomF
05-15-2006, 08:54 AM
Tom, the very fact that he calls himself a "peace activist" makes his words suspect. He's there with an ax to grind, with a predetermined perspective.True enough, but show me any media source which does nothing to promote it's own perspective. I've crafted dozens of press releases and communiques promoting what government Ministers want their public to think about the decisions in meetings they've just concluded, and know whereof I speak. You saying that Fox and CNN have no ax to grind? That the coalition forces' communications folks have none either?

So once again, do you dispute this eyewitness' claim that in fact the crowd gathered for the famous Saddam-statue scene was relatively small? Do you think that really, the square was jammed to bursting, as the camera angles on Fox/CNN encouraged us to believe?

High C
05-15-2006, 09:29 AM
...So once again, do you dispute this eyewitness' claim that in fact the crowd gathered for the famous Saddam-statue scene was relatively small? Do you think that really, the square was jammed to bursting, as the camera angles on Fox/CNN encouraged us to believe?

It doesn't matter whether that scene was staged/manipulated. That's not even what we're talking about. We're talking about the frequent claim by opponents of the war that coalition soldiers were not warmly welcomed by the Iraqi people. They were. There were many scenes of such reported and filmed. They were shown on multiple news outlets throughout the world. Then, only a day or two later, it became obvious that the Iraqi military that we wrongly thought was totally defeated had instead shed its uniforms, blended into the background, and begun its campaign of random murder and terror.

At that point, yes, the all too brief celebration quickly ended.

The point being that those who merrily mock proponents of the war by saying words to the effect, "and you said they would greet us with flowers in the strees, hahh!" are full of crap. Coalition forces were well recieved.

huisjen
05-15-2006, 09:33 AM
...By a paid reception committee. Everyone else was a little more ambivalent.

Dan

TomF
05-15-2006, 09:47 AM
Well recieved by some, certainly; there was some jubilation when folks felt themselves freed of Saddam and his sons. But warily received by others, who suspect Western motives. And received with open hostility by others yet ... including the element you've just mentioned.

The welcome appears to have worn a bit thin since those early days.

John of Phoenix
05-15-2006, 09:58 AM
These violent delights have violent ends
And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
Which, as they kiss, consume.

"Sure didn't see that one comin'." - Rummy.

Lew Barrett
05-15-2006, 02:00 PM
1. It is impossible to revise a history that has yet to be made.
2. The "broad coalition" relied on 80% US troops and 90% US money.
3. Yes
Lew



We were greeted as liberators, despite history revisionism which says otherwise. I saw it on television. I suspect you did as well.

And it wasn't just the US military that was greeted warmly, it was a broad coalition of nations which were acting on what was universally believed to be certain knowledge of a legitimate threat.

And now the whole thing was just the creation of the bad old US of A?
:rolleyes: What a crock. :rolleyes: