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View Full Version : Oily sooty filth has to go,,,,,,,,



Ian Wright
09-18-2004, 10:24 AM
Patience is in the boat yard at West Mersea for her old 13hp diesel to be extracted and a nice clean new, hopfully better, unit fitted.Once the old one is out I will be able to reach those filthy parts that have been beyond reach for 15 years.
So, the question is, how to clean oily, sooty, greasy, sludgey engine space well enough for a coat or five of bilge paint to stay on?
Any favourite solvents? Steam cleaner? I already know enough not to use a pressure washer,,,,,,, smile.gif
TIA

IanW.

imported_Dutch
09-18-2004, 11:42 AM
scrae up the sludge the best you can and look for some tri sodium phosphate. mix a strong batch in hot water and scrub with a stiff bristle brush - may take several times - Id let her dry good and test paint a small test patch before committing completely

John B
09-18-2004, 02:34 PM
engine degreaser Ian. auto parts shop.
did that last week.
spray the stuff on and wash it/ hose it off after 5 or 10 minutes.

[ 09-18-2004, 03:42 PM: Message edited by: John B ]

Scott Rosen
09-18-2004, 06:55 PM
Close the boat up tight. Take a gallon of lacquer thinner. Pour it in the bilge and then slosh it around with a rag. Wear rubber gloves. Light a match. [Edited to add: JUST KIDDING]

Or use TSP and hot water and scrub with a soft bristled brush. You may have to repeat a few times.

[ 09-21-2004, 04:40 PM: Message edited by: Scott Rosen ]

Hwyl
09-18-2004, 08:06 PM
Once again I'm with John. The product I used is called "Gunk" wash it off thoroughly. If you need something gentler, you could use "Swarfega" if it's still available in Blighty. Just scrub it on and wash it off.

America does not seem to have a prodct that matches Swarfega, either for it's wonderful name or consistency. It's also the wonderful green colour---funny the things one gets homesick about.

John B
09-19-2004, 01:36 AM
I'm sure that other stuff will be cheaper and probably the best thing to use if theres lots to do but if Ians doing the same job as me IE the motor is out for service( changing in his case)and the idea is to clean up where its been, then 1 can of spray on engine cleaner will do it and hang the cost.The stuff shoots a couple of feet plus. It was too easy actually. I thought I had a mission in front of me.

stef
09-19-2004, 07:01 AM
I do not believe you have to settle for a substitute, if you have a hankering for some swarfega Hwyl you could try [URL=http://www.debsbs.com/(xnq3kj45gqsptz551qqurz45)/browse.aspx?id=20531]Deb/URL] They may even have a local distributor. Up here it tends to be found in automotive and welding supply places but the distrubution is spotty.

Stef

Oyvind Snibsoer
09-19-2004, 08:14 AM
Soot from the exhaust may be pretty hard to clean out with regular petroleum-based degreasers. Citrus based products are much better at this. Leaces a much better smell, too smile.gif You may want to call an industrial supplier in your area for advice.

In recent years, I've also found that some of the so-called "ecological" degreasers actually work much better than regular degreasers. Might leave you with a slightly better conscience, too smile.gif

Mrleft8
09-19-2004, 08:26 AM
I see Mr. Rosen has already posted my first choice... ;) My real question is: What poor skinny lad are you going to bribe into clambering into that space to actually DO this onerous task? :D

Ian Wright
09-19-2004, 02:15 PM
Originally posted by Mrleft8:
I see Mr. Rosen has already posted my first choice... ;) My real question is: What poor skinny lad are you going to bribe into clambering into that space to actually DO this onerous task? :D With the engine out of the way I, even I, can reach most of the way back to the stern gland, just. I will need to avoid a large lunch that day,,,,,,
Thanks for all the advice, except the trick with a match Scott,,,,,,,Hrumpph!
On the subject of Swarfega, If you want some but can't find it, MAKE it. A quarter pint of Paraffin (kerosine) in a bowl then whisk in some detergent (Fairy Liquid?) as if you were making Mayonaise. at some point the mixture will gell, there you are,,,,,, swarfega.
It works, it really does. Try it, but not with your wifes food processor.
TSP,,,,,,, can't get it in the UK. No one has heard of it, but I suspect it may be similar to our "sugar soap" which shifts diesel exhaust stain when nothing else will.
Looks like I have a dirty days work to look forward to. Ah well,,,,,,,

IanW

Peter Malcolm Jardine
09-19-2004, 02:32 PM
Dishwasher powdered detergent, and laundry detergent both work pretty well as a finish up. HOT water and either one of these and swish them around and let them sit a couple of days then swish them around some more and repeat. Remember, these detergents are designed for tough stains and grease. I have used tsp, but I also have used degreaser first, then the soap trick a couple of times

Scott Rosen
09-19-2004, 07:21 PM
Umm. Just in case anyone might think otherwise . . . Don't use lacquer thinner or any other volatile solvent unless you have really good ventilation.

imported_Dutch
09-19-2004, 11:00 PM
you might have gotten some one killed with an inane remark like that

Ian Wright
09-20-2004, 03:42 AM
Originally posted by Dutch:
you might have gotten some one killed with an inane remark like thatNah,,,,,, only people too stupid to live, but innocent boats might be at risk from ptstl so you have a (slight) point,,,,, smile.gif

IanW

[ 09-20-2004, 06:42 AM: Message edited by: Ian Wright ]

martin schulz
09-20-2004, 11:24 AM
Originally posted by Ian Wright:
Patience is in the boat yard at West Mersea...Just went by Ian.
Saturday from Brightlingsea to Maldon and back on Sunday.

Meerkat
09-20-2004, 03:38 PM
I was going to suggest undiluted dish detergent, but I've been beat to it ;) . I don't recall the chemistry details, but most soap is able to combine with oil it comes in contact with and actually create more soap, which is why the dish detergent manufacturers can make those claims about removing oily deposits on dishes.

John B
09-20-2004, 03:51 PM
We use the dish detergent mostly but it doesn't cope with the "special " kind of job that the grime off the engine is.
BTW, I believe the stuff we used was called Yukoff. ( make Russian joke here. ;) )

dmede
09-20-2004, 03:56 PM
the guys who make POR 15 make a prodsct called Marine Clean. its a water based cleaner/degreaser. this stuff works great and because its water based (unlike the engine degreasers which are petroleum based) it cleans up pretty easy. might be worth a look.

http://www.por15.com/product.asp?productid=156

dave

Scott Rosen
09-21-2004, 09:53 AM
Originally posted by Dutch:
you might have gotten some one killed with an inane remark like thatYou weren't thinking of taking my advice, were you?! :eek:

I'm glad I caught you in time.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
09-21-2004, 10:57 AM
Powdered dish detergent has a far more corrosive capability on grease and so on, that's why some dishes are not d/w safe. If you have a porcelain sink with a stain in it, put d/w powder in it, and leave it for the day. Gone.

brian.cunningham
09-21-2004, 03:04 PM
Originally posted by Scott Rosen:
Close the boat up tight. Take a gallon of lacquer thinner. Pour it in the bilge and then slosh it around with a rag. Wear rubber gloves. Light a match.Scott,
The touble with a joke post like that on the internet, is that some idiot might actually try it! :eek:

NormMessinger
09-21-2004, 03:40 PM
That could only improve the gene pool.

John B
09-21-2004, 03:47 PM
exactly.

Alan D. Hyde
09-21-2004, 04:40 PM
:D