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View Full Version : An attractive ultralight rowboat -- John W's Huffboat



Bruce Taylor
11-12-2002, 07:47 PM
Anyone who is interested in a nice easily-portaged rowboat should have a look at John Welsford's recently launched Huffboat:
http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/articles/huffboat/huffboat.htm

Anyone who has been following my own attempt to design an ultralight dinghy will see why I'm interested in this boat.

It looks good, can be hefted by one person, and evidently it rows well too. Unless I'm mistaken, it neatly plugs the gap left by the disappearance of Redmond's Whisp. Congrats on the launch, John.

reddog
11-12-2002, 08:26 PM
Yes,Bruce I can see what sparked your interest.How large of a motor do you figgure it would handle?
Bears a resemblance to a Rangely boat fined down a bit and with "modern" construction.
Certainly has nice lines.
Earl

Bruce Taylor
11-12-2002, 09:38 PM
How large of a motor do you figgure it would handle?I'd guess if you wanted a motor, an electric troller would move it along without a fuss. Such a light, narrow thing (85 lbs, 3' 4" beam, LOA 16' 8") would probably go forever on a single charge.

Maybe John will stop by and say a few words about it. I'd like to know more about the background of the design.

[ 11-13-2002, 08:00 AM: Message edited by: Bruce Taylor ]

John B
11-12-2002, 09:56 PM
I saw some photos of it being built and it captivated my interest in a big way. He's going to have it at the Mahurangi regatta in jan/feb .

Ron Williamson
11-13-2002, 06:10 AM
So how goes the re-inventing of the wheel? :D
R

Bruce Taylor
11-13-2002, 07:06 AM
Funny you should put it that way, Ron...I was thinking of putting wheels on it. smile.gif Anyway, I've lofted it, and finished half the moulds. I should have the moulds set up in a week or two. Over the winter I can do odd jobs...spars, stem laminations, etc., but I can't do the planking in my wood-heated shop...so I'll just have to put it aside.

john welsford
11-13-2002, 11:17 PM
I am writing a series of articles on her, one posting very soon is about last nights midnight row out on Lake Rotorua, thats being sent to Bill Serjeant at www.btinternet.com/~w.sejeant/ (http://www.btinternet.com/~w.sejeant/)
, there will be a technical one at by site soon, www.jwboatdesigns.co.nz (http://www.jwboatdesigns.co.nz) and a cruising one when I've been cruising.
She is though a whole serioes in construction and design experiments, for example I usually use a lap joint of 6 x the ply thickness but on this one I am down to 3 x the 3/16 ply (a 9 /16 lap, about 14mm) with no mechanical fastenings o=r tape backings, she was built over shadow moulds 500mm apart with no stringers to back the planking, she was shell built with no frames and then the frames spiled in, the shape is unusual in that the c of b is a long way further aft than is usual, the run aft flattened and tucked up sharply to the transom, the forward sections being narrow and deeply veed.
She's also a bit narrower than usual across the gunwales making the rowlocks closer than my usual minimum. The whole objective was to produce a shape that would row smoothly in the short nasty chop that our shallow fresh water lake raises in a breeze and to see if that shape would perform in salt and deep water.
There are also experiments in terms of glue type and methodology, rowlock pins and mountings, oar construction, seat framing and joints, Ply scarfing and stem construction.
I do experiments like this from time to time so I can advise clients with some experience to back me up. In this case I can already tell you that 3/16 gaboon ply planks 110mm wide need closer moulds than I used to keep them fair, that was a stinker of a job to get right.

Yours, JOhnW


Originally posted by Bruce Taylor:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />How large of a motor do you figgure it would handle?I'd guess if you wanted a motor, an electric troller would move it along without a fuss. Such a light, narrow thing (85 lbs, 3' 4" beam, LOA 16' 8") would probably go forever on a single charge.

Maybe John will stop by and say a few words about it. I'd like to know more about the background of the design.</font>[/QUOTE]

Bruce Taylor
11-14-2002, 07:17 AM
Why are you specifying 1/4" ply, instead of adding more stations? Will it add much weight?

Phil Young
11-15-2002, 12:50 AM
Not dissimilar to Oughtred's Acorn, or at least the 15'version. Much flatter run aft though. Lovely boat.

john welsford
11-15-2002, 01:01 AM
1/4in ply will add about 4kg ( 9lbs about). I cant see that as being an issue as not many people want to walk around with a 17 foot rowboat in one hand. For many people the handling of the thicker and stiffer ply will make things like bevelling the plank lands and cutting the winding bevels at each end much easier, plus the boat will be a lot more resistant to holing if you row into a snag going down current at 6knots.
On motors, it would be hard to keep a 2hp throttled down enough unless the boat were heavily loaded, the electric trolling motor would be great though and I can imagine the parasol and crinoline set enjoying their champers and cucumber sammies while slipping noiselessly along.

John


Originally posted by Bruce Taylor:
Why are you specifying 1/4" ply, instead of adding more stations? Will it add much weight?