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petey
06-06-2005, 09:35 PM
I am going to be starting my first boat soon and I will be doing it in my garage because I cant spare the space in my shop. So I will be using a lot of hand tools for asssembly. I was wondering about a bench. Anybody got plans or know of some for a good boatbuilding bench. Thanks

Dave Fleming
06-06-2005, 09:37 PM
THE WORKBENCH BOOK
by Scott Landis

pub by TAUNTON PRESS.

Tom Hoffman
06-06-2005, 10:15 PM
Petey, I am building a stripper 20' Whitehall, and many of my boards are less than 20' so the first bench I built was a 18' 2X12 fastened along one wall of my shop at about 38" up on shelf support brackets. Gives a very cheap long surface to work on long wood.

My favorite dead on flat work surface is a cheap hollow core door blank 36X80 from the home inporvement store for about $30.00. It is lite, and easy to move around and on two saw horses makes a very acceptable bench. Plus when you are done, it won't break your heart if there is expoxy or paint or glue all over it.

Just some thoughts.

JimConlin
06-06-2005, 11:38 PM
For small boats, I've dearly cherished a 4' shelf which hangs, from the shop ceiling, over the patient. The ideal place for small tools, coffee cup, etc.
Mine has some upper hooks which hold a few dozen canoe strips. Could also hold battens.

Jay Greer
06-07-2005, 01:02 AM
Over the years, I have come to prefer a bench that can be walked around and got at from all sides. I like my benches narrow, 18 to 19 inches plus a tool tray on the back. I usually make the tops out of 2x4s that are drilled through bolted and glued to make a heavy stable top. The legs are made of 4x4's at the four corners and are supported by mortised framing that are also mortised into the top. I store tools in drawers underneath to add weight. A light flimsy bench has no place in a boat shop. Two sets of dog holes run the length which is roughly 8 feet a tail vise on one end and a side vise that is one of the current copies of the Emert Pattern Makers Vise will hold just about any shape you can come up with. A bench jack or a series of dog holes along the face allow for planing long planks on edge.

Lion
06-07-2005, 03:11 AM
Pictures please!

Lion

Tom Robb
06-08-2005, 01:12 PM
Zillions of designs out there. Nothing magical about them - just a sturdy table with some method(s) of holding your workpiece. Boatbuilders often seem to have pretty rough ones compared to the furnature like beauties that hand tool furnature makers use.
A plank and/or spar bench, long and narrow, probably attached to a wall is nice and so is a walk-around sort. A 300 pound European style cabnetmakers bench may not be apropriate, but it'll look pretty.
Check Taunton Press, check your library. Don't put much money into the first one, you'll want to change it after some experience w/ it.

[ 06-08-2005, 02:14 PM: Message edited by: Tom Robb ]

Bob Smalser
06-08-2005, 02:27 PM
This one is cheap and very effective. Getting at the workpiece from 4 sides is important, and weight is important.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/7297605/95066141.jpg

Bench is narrow....24 X 60.

Weighs over 300lbs, but is easily scootched around when necessary.

A quick-action, 100-dollar Jet vise is rigged as an end vise....much faster than the usual 2-screw end vises.

The tool tray facilitates keeping the work surface clean.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/7297605/95066292.jpg

A 200-dollar Emmert clone lives at the far end.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/7297605/95066299.jpg

My father made it out of Longleaf Pine and beech.....I finally wore the beech top out and overlayed a laid-up top.

[ 06-08-2005, 08:21 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Gallus102
06-09-2005, 06:10 AM
In Landis' Workshop book that Dave mentioned, there is a chapter on boatbuilding benches. One of the features is Sam Manning's Bench & Anvil. Although it looks like a heavy duty sawhorse, it truly is a bench and a very versatile one. I have built two of them and will probably build a third, even though I have a couple of regular woodworking benches--they are that good. Manning's design is six feet long. I made mine a bit shorter (60 and 42 inches respectively) because of space limitations.

Take a look at Manning's approach. It is very practical, quick to build, and you can move it anywhere you need to. All virtues when messing about boats....

petey
06-09-2005, 01:02 PM
Originally posted by Tom Robb:
Zillions of designs out there. Nothing magical about them - just a sturdy table with some method(s) of holding your workpiece. Boatbuilders often seem to have pretty rough ones compared to the furnature like beauties that hand tool furnature makers use.
A plank and/or spar bench, long and narrow, probably attached to a wall is nice and so is a walk-around sort. A 300 pound European style cabnetmakers bench may not be apropriate, but it'll look pretty.
Check Taunton Press, check your library. Don't put much money into the first one, you'll want to change it after some experience w/ it.

petey
06-09-2005, 01:05 PM
that is what I was thinking, since I will be building a lapstrake that is about 15'long won't I need a bench about that long to work on the planks?

htom
06-09-2005, 02:14 PM
Guy I knew made an glued and screwed I-beam of three 2x6, 16' long, and clamped each end to a sawhorse when he needed to use it. He drilled 1 1/2" holes along the length of the center member every 6" or so for various clamping purposes.

David W Pratt
06-09-2005, 03:21 PM
About 4 winters ago, I built an 8' pram in our unheated barn. Ten foot 2x4s and a ripped piece of 3/4 inch ply made a strong back. T get the epoxy to kick, i put a series of 40 watt bulbs in fixtures down the length. A friend called it the electric boat shop.

Tom Hoffman
06-09-2005, 05:03 PM
posted 06-06-2005 11:15 PM
Petey, I am building a stripper 20' Whitehall, and many of my boards are less than 20' so the first bench I built was a 18' 2X12 fastened along one wall of my shop at about 38" up on shelf support brackets. Gives a very cheap long surface to work on long wood.

Above I wrote this,k this will give you a very nice acceptable work surface to work on your planks.

As for a vice, I have a pair of Zyliss vices that clamp along the edge of a bench any where you need them and with the end fixture, you can hold anything you like as long as you can clamp the tail clamp to something.

Vincent Serio III
06-09-2005, 06:05 PM
I downloaded the plans for the Weekend Bench seen in this link--they were great plans and economical. The Weekend Bench was easy to build from 2x4 lumber and I bought the nice Record vise on ebay. I'm very pleased with this simple, yet sturdy bench.

Workbenches (http://www.plansnow.com/workbenchplans.html)