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Fitz
11-12-2005, 08:03 PM
We took the kids to Plimoth Plantation today as a primer for the upcoming holiday. Here are a few of the wooden boats we came across today....

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid194/pb4cad70cc94dd267a2ca92991c5f71b0/f17c2127.jpg
Wampanoag Boat Builder

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid194/p0e6411cfec482364e838a1ece6213bc3/f17c210e.jpg

Dug Out

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid194/p1126f9dad1012119abf81c2c6a6ec412/f17c2105.jpg
Mayflower II

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid194/p80deeb8bd178a311f5eab1a7589c3dcf/f17c2054.jpg
Crow's Nest

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid194/p0e63d8d4b5513ee36578b99fb9c30334/f17c203c.jpg

Launch

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid194/p321419333c4c08fa434a9c7615b6392f/f17c202e.jpg

The Harbor
http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid194/p58acc43a75f97b1345de26113ea4409c/f17c1f9c.jpg

One Famous Jumping Off Spot...

Biggest disappointment of the day was the High School student that I over heard saying, "What's the story with the rock?" :rolleyes:

DanO
11-12-2005, 08:12 PM
If you took the photo of the Mayflower earlier in the season last year, you might have caught a photo of my dingy. It's a crappy looking think which is almost always half full of water, but I keep it tied up just next to the "shallop" in the photo. The dingy is suitable, though, since it goes with my 24' fiberglass sloop, and neither are much to look at (though the sloop is considerably drier and not a bad sailor for kicking around Plymouth and Duxbury harbors. One day I'll have a showy wooden boat out there (if I ever finish building it!)

Dan

Kermit
11-12-2005, 10:54 PM
Some years back I was at Plimouth, first throught the gate in the ayem in order to see the place before it was full of bermuda shorts and cameras. After a couple of hours I was standing at the top of the hill looking down at the village, when a couple in their 60's or so came in.

The fellow says to wife, "Where are we?"

"Plymouth, dear. Where the Pilgrims lived."

"Naw," says he, "I learned about them in school. They NEVER would have lived like THIS!"

He turned and left, choosing to live with what he knew rather than the truth.

:rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :confused: :(

uncas
11-13-2005, 07:36 AM
Great pics...but the contents of some of the messages were depressing...

lagspiller
11-14-2005, 09:55 AM
Interesting...
I'm doing a text in our English book based on Plimouth Plantation right now at school. I didn't know it was a real place.

Can anybody tell me why it is spelled Pli' instead of Ply...?

notwoodbut...
11-14-2005, 10:09 AM
We live in the next town over and belong to Plymouth YC.
Mayflower is docked at the waterfront near the Rock and Plimouth Plantation is a few miles away.
http://www.plimoth.org/
It's amusing to see the expressions on tourists' faces when they see that little rock after traveling hundreds or even thousands of miles. Not real impressive. My neighbor works at the Plantation as an "Interpretor." He certainly looks the part when in costume with a full beard although when he's driving his little convertible auto he's a bit of a sight.
I often think what life must have been like here almost 400 years ago for folks not used to being in what at that time was the very edge of an immense wilderness. They were either real brave or really nuts.
Why "Plimouth"? I suppose it's the "olde" English spelling from that period. Not sure when "Plymouth" became the common spelling.
edited to include this from the Plimouth site
15. Why is Plymouth spelled "P-l-i-m-o-t-h"?

Visitors to the museum often question the unusual spelling of the name “Plymouth” in “Plimoth Plantation.” “Plimoth” is an old-fashioned spelling used by Governor William Bradford in his history of the colony, Of Plymouth Plantation. This spelling was adopted to differentiate the museum from the modern town of Plymouth. There were no rules for the spelling of English words in the early 17th century, and each writer did as he or she pleased, phonetically spelling the word as seemed fit – sometimes differently on a single page.

Plymouth is spelled a number of ways in the early colony documents, including “Plymouth,” “Plimouth,” “Plymoth,” and “Plimoth.” When Plimoth Plantation was founded, it was decided to use Governor Bradford’s most common usage, “Plimoth.”

[ 11-14-2005, 11:35 AM: Message edited by: notwoodbut... ]

Alan D. Hyde
11-14-2005, 10:22 AM
The town is "Plymouth."

The re-created histioric site is "Plimoth Plantation" TM.

If the story interests you, buy & read Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford, S.E. Morison, Editor. Available at---

http://www.marketstream.com/acb/showdetl.cfm?&DID=12&CATID=6&ObjectGroup_ID=44&OBS=2&Move=Prev&count=1&Pcount=10

Here's the basic link for Plimoth Plantation's website---

www.plimoth.org (http://www.plimoth.org)

***

Alan

[ 11-14-2005, 11:26 AM: Message edited by: Alan D. Hyde ]

TimothyB
11-14-2005, 10:25 AM
Well, there is also the fact that the first place they set foot at was, in fact, in Provincetown.

The whole business with Plymouth Rock is based entirely on one person's testimony:


According to historian George Willison, who devoted his life to the subject, the story about the rock is all malarkey, a public relations stunt pulled off by townsfolk to attract attention. What Willison found out is that the Plymouth Rock legend rests entirely on the dubious testimony of Thomas Faunce, a ninety-five year old man, who told the story more than a century after the Mayflower landed.Also, the Pilgrims were NOT Puritans. They were pretty heterogenous and very eclectic for their time, and believed that The Church of England was beyond redemption. They came over in search of riches, as well as to escape from The Church Of England. The Puritans came over and settled in Boston about 10 years after The Pilgrims, believed that The Church of England might be saved, and came here to practice their religion freely (but did not believe in dissent).

The Pilgrims didn't wear black, they didn't have steepled hats nor buckled shoes/hats, nor did they carry blunderbusses for hunting. They were just regular folk, farmers and etc.

Plimoth plantation gets a lot of it right in general terms though. smile.gif What is not mentioned in our textbooks is that smallpox (and other contagions) is what allowed the Pilgrims to be able to have a chance at colonizing the New World. There are numerous mentions of the "heathen savages" being cleansed by God through smallpox. There is a reason that The Pilgrims found such well suited farmland on the east coast.. it was created by the Natives.

Current, and very well researched, estimates of the indigenous American population before the advent of Western dieseases show that at least 60% and possibly up to 95% of the indigenous population was killed by disease spread by western explorers and animals carried over by them in ships. This was supplemented by germ warfare as the continent was settled (smallpox impregnated blankets, etc)

Beautiful boats and ships from that time though.

notwoodbut...
11-14-2005, 10:38 AM
Fitz-
Too bad you didn't get to see the shallop under sail. She moves along quite nicely and is suprisingly quick. The Mayflower has been out sailing too in the last couple of years though I'm not sure just how capable she is.

Rick Tyler
11-14-2005, 10:46 AM
Originally posted by TimothyB:
There are numerous mentions of the "heathen savages" being cleansed by God through smallpox. (...) Current, and very well researched, estimates of the indigenous American population before the advent of Western dieseases show that at least 60% and possibly up to 95% of the indigenous population was killed by disease spread by western explorers and animals carried over by them in ships. This was supplemented by germ warfare as the continent was settled (smallpox impregnated blankets, etc)It's one of the more interesting bits from "Guns, Germs, and Steel" by Jared Diamond. Infected blankets had nothing to do with it, though. After the Spanish started serious exploration in Central America and the West Indies around 1500, the native population of the Americas had crashed by as much as 95% within 50 years. European diseases such as small pox and measles killed native peoples thousands of miles away from the nearest European. Before Europeans started settling North America in the 17th century the population there was already devastated. The only deadly disease the Europeans got in exchange was syphillis.

uncas
11-14-2005, 12:20 PM
Well, regardless as to where the Mayflower landed, if it hadn't I wouldn't be here...Perhaps not a great loss.