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rbgarr
08-26-2004, 05:56 PM
Yesterday afternoon there was a memorial procession (of lobsterboats) around the perimeter of the harbor for a recently deceased and very popular local lobsterman. About sixty boats were in the procession and like a funeral procession of automobiles, it's considered disrespectful to break through or get into the line of traffic.

This yacht http://www.spencerrigging.co.uk/adix.html came right through the fleet (under power) and created a bit of havoc and annoyance, especially since she'd been radioed with the information about what was going on. She had plenty of warning and room to maneuver to wait for the procession to pass by. :rolleyes:

Larch_Keilson
08-26-2004, 06:21 PM
May they be 'eaten alive by lobster, lobster.' I hesitate to say anything bad about our cousins overseas, but ...well, maybe they just didn't know what was going on ...like at the 1858 Battle of Shirtliftington off Kings Cross Roadstead.

Hwyl
08-26-2004, 06:25 PM
I don't know if Paul Goss is still the skipper. I can't see him doing that.

John B
08-26-2004, 07:48 PM
not very nice eh.

ErikH
08-26-2004, 09:04 PM
I have always though funeral processions somewhat odd. It's all well and good for the people involved to personally respect the deceased, but when they start forcing me to give way (and where I live there seem to be a LOT of them) it gets old fast. The dead person surely doesn't care whether you stop traffic (or occupy the harbor) or not.

I know this is a relatively unpopular point of view, right up there with telling the truth about dead people rather than beitifying them during eulogies. But I don't think the schooner operator is necessarily a bad person. He certainly didn't seem to know the deceased, and if the others wanted to guarantee no interruption whatsoever of their mourning, they perhaps shouldn't have occupied a busy harbor. Yup, he violated some social codes, and was rude, but that's about it.

Ian McColgin
08-27-2004, 07:21 AM
This recounting makes it sound like obediance to the law of relative tonnage.

Though you don't say, she presumably acknowledged the radio contact. If not, you've actually no idea whether she heard or not. A boat that size should be monitoring 16 and 13 but, being foreign flagged, might have only monitored 16.

You don't describe the total area so we readers don't know if you're right that she could have maneuvered out of the way. That's a lot of boat to just donkey about.

Had I been her captain and had I heard the calls and were I constrained in my ability to maneuver, I might well have come back on the radio to mention all that.

But the normal rules of the road are not suspended for a boat parade, no matter how solumn the occasion. If the deal was all that disruptive, it indicates that the parading boats were not paying good attention.

Ken Buck
08-27-2004, 12:22 PM
It's all well and good for the people involved to personally
respect the deceased, but when they start forcing me to give
way [...] it gets old fast. The dead person surely doesn't
care whether you stop traffic (or occupy the harbor) or not.
[...] Yup, he violated some social codes, and was rude,
but that's about it.
Well... funerals aren't really for the deceased, they're for
the people left behind. When we show respect for the dead,
we're showing respect to their friends and relatives who
are experiencing the grief of a loss. It's easy to ignore
the importance of this until you are the one on the receiving
end.

As to the circumstances of schooner and the memorial procession
of boats, I don't know the details so will give the benefit
of the doubt. I've never encountered a funeral or memorial
procession on the water, though it sounds like a nice idea.
Being less common and perhaps less obvious than such
processions on land could lead to some confusion, though.
Most people are not intentionally rude, but not everyone is
likely to recognize the purpose of such a procession without
being informed of its nature.

Meerkat
08-27-2004, 04:59 PM
A funeral procession of boats, more or less defines (with apologies to the Irish) a wake, eh? :D

Hughman
08-27-2004, 09:03 PM
This boat might just be anchored in Rockland tonight.
I'll have to get a little closer to look.

George.
08-28-2004, 06:26 AM
I've seen Adix in the press. Owned by an Argentinian businessman, I believe.

As for difficult to maneuver, I bet she has some great bow thrusters. Probably easier to handle than Dalia....

TimH
09-01-2004, 06:36 AM
http://www.spencerrigging.co.uk/adix1.jpg

John B
09-01-2004, 04:14 PM
several years ago she came smoking along out of a rainsquall behind us on passage down from Kawau to Auckland.. about 25 miles or so. We won't normally sail in 40 knots but that was the last day of our cruise we had cabin fever from a few days of bad weather and we wanted to go home.

She had her rail nearly down .. just lowers set and she was moving quick! Utterly magnificent is how she looked on that day.

[ 09-01-2004, 05:15 PM: Message edited by: John B ]

George.
09-01-2004, 04:32 PM
Originally posted by Meerkat:
A funeral procession of boats, more or less defines (with apologies to the Irish) a wake, eh? :D From A Sailor's Dictionary, if I recall correctly:

Wake: 1. the horizontal track made by a boat as it moves through the water. 2. The ceremony held for the skipper if said track becomes vertical.

JimConlin
09-01-2004, 07:37 PM
As clearly as though it were yesterday, I remember being in a tense drifting match off Marblehead in 1965. Race week, last race, no less. Through the fleet steamed some DuPont scion in an enormous gold-plater with a bigger wake. I savor still the joy of shouting "You plumber!". It doesn't matter if he heard me.

Apologies to all plumbers.

Jim

TimH
09-01-2004, 07:47 PM
Originally posted by John B:
She had her rail nearly down .. just lowers set and she was moving quick! Utterly magnificent is how she looked on that day.who was it that said "Now she schoons boys!" or something like that... smile.gif

John B
09-01-2004, 07:58 PM
Didn't Adix start life as a bit of a lemon. She got the bow and stern chopped off and reformed, reballasted , re rigged etc to turn her into what she is today.
zat right. Do I have the right boat ?

Hwyl
09-01-2004, 08:31 PM
I'm not sure about that. I know she was originally called Jessica. She had square sails (topgallant?) on her foremast. She was originally designed by Arthur Holgate, he was killed by a snowplough in Maine when she was being built (although she was built in Mallorca Spain). She was redesigned by Gerry Djikstra. I've heard that Holgate was something of a magician---he designed the staysail schooner Arcturus that Lucky Luke posted here sometime ago. Jessica was commisioned by the then owner of America (the replica) when Arcturus sailed through America's lee, crewed only by Arthur Holgate and a French girl suitably un-attired. I think that if Holgate had been around to finish supervision of the build and her sailing, the redesign would not have been needed.

When Jessica first came into Antigua, they had a party on board, they moved her closer to the shore, and her bowsprit was literally over the cockpit of the boat I was on. I was not invited on board. The boat was names after the owners girlfriend, who had been asecretary in the Nicholson office in Antigua. Her first name was Norma, and was known as "Gorgeous Norma"

The next day, there was a dayworker on the boat I was on (I was the former skipper doing a handover) The new skipper and I were ashore and unbeknownst to us the worker was blasting my Peter Tosh tape through the deck speakers.

I went back on board and the mate on Jessica beckoned to me to answer the VHF, I did and we switched channels, he informed me in a haughty English accent, that the owner of Jessica was most upset about the loud "disco' on our boat. Well I verbally laid into him, letting him know in no uncertain terms about his double standard, that it was OK to have a party and not invite the neighbour whose space he was encroaching upon, yet give his one sided haughty judgement the next day (having said that,I admit the music was too loud).

That night in the Admiral's Inn; one of the Antigua old timer's came over to me and thrust a Red Stripe beer in my hand. He congratulated me on my tirade and said how much he had enjoyed it. I asked him how he had heard, because we had switched to a working channel. He said "Gareth, I knew you would be mad that you were not invited last night, and I was on board Jessica today when the music was playing, so as soon as I heard you being called on the VHF, I switched channels to listen".

I admit to being outspoken now, but in those days I thought I was fairly diplomatic.

[ 09-01-2004, 09:43 PM: Message edited by: Hwyl ]

John B
09-01-2004, 10:10 PM
:D
I'm much more diplomatic these days myself.