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Dave Fleming
11-18-2002, 03:26 PM
If so what be they saying here? I got a clue what INOX is and I see 316 so these 'igorant' lad would like to understand what is being said?

Oh if my dear Aunt, the PHD in French one, could see me now, sigh. redface.gif

Inox= Stainless Steel? (http://www.hisse-et-oh.com/articles/article.php?article=22)

Iceboy
11-18-2002, 03:36 PM
Dave, try this url for all of your translating needs. It's free and has several different options for trnslating web pages.
http://www.tranexp.com:2000/InterTran
JimmyM

ACB
11-18-2002, 03:46 PM
In a nutshell (not verbatim, but the gist) use 316L stainless, polished and passivated in phosphoric acid, for all oceanographic applications; lesser grades of stainless will pit and develop crevice corrosion.

Dave Fleming
11-18-2002, 03:50 PM
Thanks JimmyM, unfortunately it does a less than stellar job with that site, sigh.
Too many words not translated and the cursor movement advice does not seem to work for most of them.

Dave Fleming
11-18-2002, 03:52 PM
ACB, many thanks!!!!

Bayboat
11-18-2002, 05:34 PM
Dave, all the French you'll ever need is:
Wee
Mercy bookoop
Voolyvoo a cushay aveck mwa?
Weeski aveck oh, sill vooplay.

Dave Fleming
11-18-2002, 06:15 PM
Substitute the first word of the last line with...
Rhum and I with ya. ;)

With respect to our French colleagues

Eric Sea Frog
11-19-2002, 11:07 AM
Originally posted by Bayboat:

Voolayvoo cooshay aveck mwa?
Definitely not, Professor.

Garrett Lowell
11-19-2002, 03:18 PM
Don't forget the most important French phrase:
Mayday

ken mcclure
11-19-2002, 07:55 PM
The only thing I can say in French is "meau de laun."

Means "cut the grass."

Don Olney
11-19-2002, 08:26 PM
There's a pretty good French restaurant on the corner. I think its named after some French king, Roi Roger. They've got some nice designs on their cups like you'd expect from the French. Prices are pretty good too.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid39/pa5ea065c1e795d0376b2614c897ab45e/fd068e87.jpg

Rob H
11-19-2002, 08:58 PM
Vive le matelotage franšais!

Art Read
11-20-2002, 01:02 AM
Don't forget that fine shopping emporium, "Tarjae"

Eric Sea Frog
11-20-2002, 04:47 AM
Originally posted by Don Olney:
There's a pretty good French restaurant on the corner. I think its named after some French king, Roi Roger. They've got some nice designs on their cups like you'd expect from the French. Prices are pretty good too.
No French king of that name, Don, sorry! I surmise from his attire that Roy one was a regular cowboy, though perhaps the king of them!
smile.gif
This reminds me of my first hamburger, btw. US friends had cooked a few to show us, in the early 70es. Real meat from the butcher's; real (or, rather, French) bread; good sauces. Yum!
The stuff they sell here in QuickBurgers and McDos seem so tasteless now. I've heard there's soja and glutamate in them.

Eric Sea Frog
11-20-2002, 04:50 AM
Originally posted by ken mcclure:
The only thing I can say in French is "meau de laun."
Means "cut the grass."The actual translation goes as:

"Tondre la pelouse" (To mow the lawn!)

Yanis Abols
11-20-2002, 07:38 AM
In France stainless steel is often categorized as inox A4 or inox A2, on the labels of harware for example.
A4 is 316, 316L, 316Ti stainless steel.
A2 is 305 Cu, 304, 304L, 302 stainless steel. As stated by others, A2 ss is not marine grade stainless steel.
I hope this helps if you ever have to buy french inox !

Shang
11-20-2002, 08:50 AM
I've found that "Please," and "Thank You" serve well when traveling in France.

...Even sometimes when traveling in the U.S.A.

John Gearing
11-20-2002, 10:37 AM
Now how about getting at the substance of the message at this French site? I have my doubts whether 316 is any good at all for underwater application. It is my understanding that stainless steel becomes such due to the presence of chromium in the alloy. The chromium reacts with the atmosphere to form an oxide layer on the metal's surface. This chromium oxide layer protects the iron in the alloy from oxidizing (rusting) by acting as a barrier between the iron and the atmosphere. The chromium oxide layer continually refreshes itself as it wears away. But when you submerge a piece of stainless in salt water for a length of time, the chromium layer is worn away and cannot replenish itself since the water excludes the atmosphere the chromium reacts with. The salt water however, is more than happy to react with the iron in the stainless steel and rapidly corrodes. Assuming that this is how the phenomenon occurs, I have a difficult time seeing why 316 would be any better in this regard than another grade of stainless. Anyone else have any thoughts on this?

Yanis Abols
11-20-2002, 11:36 AM
316L is the alloy used to manufacture stainless steel implants for orthopedic surgery. The body is, essentially, salt water. Corrosion of stainless steel orthopedic implants is not a problem, or we would soon hear about it from the lawyers !