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Iceboy
04-29-2004, 11:20 AM
Any one out there have a cat that has seizures? What was the outcome and or cause? Any help would be appreciated. Heartless jabs and political rantings would not. Thank you.

John of Phoenix
04-29-2004, 11:36 AM
My sister-in-law had a dog that began to have seizures. Brain tumor.

How long has this been going on?

Gresham CA
04-29-2004, 11:40 AM
IIRC Donn has a dog that had seizures that were cause by flea and tick medicine. Maybe it will do the same with cats.

Iceboy
04-29-2004, 11:41 AM
He's only had two about a month apart. He also exhibits some strange behavior as in running around like something is biting him. That occurs frequently. He is at the Vet as we speak. The seizures totally incapacitate him. He flops around with claws extended and afterwards has really dilated pupils. We have two other cats and neither of them or the two dogs have this problem. We have eliminated poisoning or household chemicals as we keep these locked up. They are all three inside cats. Thank you for your reply.

Shang
04-29-2004, 11:45 AM
For general information try an internet search on Google, there are many sites on this subject.
Here's one that might be a good starting place:

http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/People/lowekamp/feline_epilepsy.html

Good luck with your four-legged friend!

Rex Fearnehough
04-29-2004, 11:47 AM
I don't have a cat but I have a dog that has epilepsy. She has petit mal seizures that are followed by a larger grand mal episode.
The seizures are a shutting down of various brain functions or unconciousness.
Advice from my vet was to check for liver damage and if clear there are two options.
1.Give medication for epilepsy. Which dopes her.
2.His words, "If you can get used to seeing her in that state, give her nothing, but try to make sure that she cannot damage herself"
My dog is constantly by my side. So if she has a convulsion I cradle her and talk softly to her.
Whilst in a seizure she is not concious and is in spasm and when she wakes she knows that I am with her during this confusion.

Matt J.
04-29-2004, 11:52 AM
Lost my post, I’ll try again.

3 dogs I’ve known have had seizures (sorry, no cats, miserably allergic to the little critters). First one, a Golden retriever, Kibbles, got them from nerves – thunderstorms and the like almost always brought them on. She was put on Phenobarbital, whenever there were chances of storms. It worked, but not always, because sometimes her people weren’t home in time before summer storms hit. She knew to go to the bathtub, and would hide there if no one was around.

Second dog, a lab retriever, had them occasionally, then had a massive one, wherein it lasted (she’d come partly out, then go back into on again) for almost an hour. She was finally sedated with massive amounts of Phenobarbital injections. Then she was on daily doses for the next year before she passed away – never knew the causes of either. She didn’t mind storms, and would only have them rarely, though more often than not after aggressive playtimes.

Current pup, Ted, had his first one last year, (he was about 3). Because of the heat that day, and because he was panting heavily, it may have been a heat stroke or combination. I had to carry him inside to the air conditioning, where after a few minutes it went away, and he forgot it ever happened (such a cool boy that way).

In common, they seem to last 2-3 minutes from onset to forgotten events. They always – always, knew they were coming, as they’d search us out, and start crouching down, as if to brace for it, even on Teddy’s first one (that we’re aware of anyway). You can see the fear / brevity in their eyes as it comes on. It’s a miserable thing to watch. We’ve always tried to have spoons or something to retrieve tongues – I’ll risk my fingers before letting them choke though. (I hear it’s strongly advised against). We hold them / hold them down, try to talk them out of it calmly, letting them know we’re there and it’ll pass. We want to avoid them hitting their heads and such.

Sucks. Good luck. Pheno- worked wonders when given in time, and it seems to be the universal treatment.

Matt

Iceboy
04-29-2004, 12:26 PM
Thank you one and all for your input. Shang that is a good website and I will forward it to the Vet. My significant other works for one of the best clinics in the area where "Petey the Longtailed Pirate" is now. I am also having a dialog with the U of W School of Vet Medicine Neurology dept. They are waiting for the Vet's diagnosis. I knew I could get some good advice here on the forum. It seems that wooden boat folk seem for the most part to be pet folks as well. I'll let you all know how it turns out. Thanks again.

Wild Dingo
04-29-2004, 01:08 PM
cats have seizures whenever they come near me... but they cant help themselves they just have to rub against me leg and puuuurrrrrrrr which tends to make some weird gene in me nervous system spasm and involuntarily wrench me leg that the said cat has latched onto into a karate kick sending said cat into seizures that reach right across the room!!

BUT!! they come back for more seizures... must have some sorta scent that cats just cant get enough of a cat aphrodisiac? whatever they just keep comin back me nervous system keeps getting outta whack and me leg keeps kickin! :D

No seriously I have a reaction to cats... sorta same as they seem to have to me whereas they open their claws and DIG them into any area of flesh they can find or feel on my anatomy I tend to do the flyincatdance immeadiatly upon feeling said claws drawing blood.

suppose theres some good reason cats are still around just we have this mutual love hate thing happening :rolleyes:

Hope hes alright in the end and will live a long and fruitful life drawing blood and purrin the house down

J_Boat
04-29-2004, 03:25 PM
I have a 2 and 1/2 year old lab mix male that had gran mal siezures from the start at a rate of several a week. He now takes phenobarbitol twice a day and has not had a fit in more than a year. smile.gif The phenobarb slowed him down for a couple of days, but he seemed to adjust to it and returned to his normal boisterous puppy behavior (which still persists past 2 yrs of age.... we were kind of hoping he'd calm down a little as he reached adulthood).

Someone, in an earlier post, mentioned holding and comforting their animal through a siezure.... While my dog is normally a very affectionate, social, and likable animal, he comes out of his seizures deaf, blind, confused, aggravated and sometimes aggressive. If he thought you had anything to do with what ever it was that was messing with him and you were within reach, you might be in real trouble. While I really feel for the little fella', we generally try to move any unstable furniture out of his way and then move ourselves out of his way. I think any animal coming out of a siezure can be very dangerous.

'breaks your heart to see the little fella's going through such though.... :(

Matt J.
04-29-2004, 03:29 PM
Labs are good dogs, shame they seem to have a tendency towards siezures.

They slow down the instant they hit 3. Still puppies, still crazy, but they start trying to respect your rules, and play the game.

The three we had, were all docile as kittens when they came out (Lady was docile every time she came out and faded away that afternoon).

My concern with daily dopings is that I wonder if it loses effectiveness, when they adjust to it.

Iceboy
04-29-2004, 03:40 PM
J-boat, well I did hold him and comfort him through it and he came out of it pretty mellow and oddly enough very hungry. He cut me up a bit during the event but I have to tell you there is nothing I wouldn't do for any of my animals. They surely are a comfort when you need it.

Jack Heinlen
04-29-2004, 03:56 PM
Cat Shadow, a dear little boy cat I had for almost ten years, had a strange thing he did. He sort of lost his balance at about eight. Not all the time, but fairly regularly. I've been trying to remember the infirm diagnosis, and I can't, but it's a fairly common cat ailment.

At the time we lived on a farm, and he was always an outdoor cat, so I feared he'd been poisoned somehow by the farm chemicals.

He remained an outdoor cat to the end. He disappeared one day, in the woods of Mass. A coyote or fishercat caught up with him. Lovely little boy cat; that rich choclate, black brown fur, with just a few hairs of white on his chest. Little boy cat, less than ten pounds. He was a spook.

One of my favorite memories of him was when he was still young. The electric meter man came to read the meter, and Shadow jumped him. Scared him half to death. smile.gif

I hope your cat's problems are easy, and that he's okay.

J_Boat
04-29-2004, 04:27 PM
Originally posted by Iceboy:
J-boat, well I did hold him and comfort him through it and he came out of it pretty mellow and oddly enough very hungry. He cut me up a bit during the event but I have to tell you there is nothing I wouldn't do for any of my animals. They surely are a comfort when you need it.Yeah. I could imagine that being a little less dangerous with a cat than with a lab. I wish I could comfort my lab better/more. Unfortunately, he is big and strong enough that he is a real threat when he comes out of a siezure beat-up, blind, scared, strong and confused. I know he considers the family as his charges, but, the first time me came out a siezure, growled at my wife and I, raised his hackles, and beared his teeth, I decided we were going to have to let him regain his senses before we tried to comfort him and clean him up. Luckily, he has been siezure free for a while.

Good Luck with yours.

Matt J.
04-29-2004, 04:41 PM
J_Boat, what's the doc's prediction for the future? Will your pup always be on phenobarbital? What about lasting effects. I seem to recall a lot of concern about liver or kidney damage... maybe that was something else. Or regarding it's effects... err, will his system become immune to it or not respond to it after living with it in his system for so long? I'm just curious.

[ 04-29-2004, 04:44 PM: Message edited by: Matt J. ]

J_Boat
04-29-2004, 06:31 PM
Originally posted by Matt J.:
J_Boat, what's the doc's prediction for the future? Will your pup always be on phenobarbital? What about lasting effects. I seem to recall a lot of concern about liver or kidney damage... maybe that was something else. Or regarding it's effects... err, will his system become immune to it or not respond to it after living with it in his system for so long? I'm just curious.According to our vet'., it was very unusual for a puppy to have siezures. They said the siezures don't usually start until the animals are adults or at least hitting puberty. They asked us some questions about if it had been possible that the dog got into some pesticides or herbicides or cleaners or other. He had not. Then there was a general diagnosis of epilepsy which is not a specific diagnosis but a class of conditions involving messed up electrical brain function. Apparently, barbituates are the 'go-to' treatment in the pet world and so Merlin (the mutt) was put on gradually increasing dosages until the siezures quit. He is taking a lot (60mg twice a day - the max the vet was willing to try) and there is concern about liver and kidney damage and there is the possibility that it may eventually become ineffective. While those are concerns, the obvious discomfort during the siezures and sometimes several hours of altered function (sitting and staring, walking in circles, etc.) and the concern about people being safe around him when he is in his 'coming out of a siezure aggitated state' makes us go ahead with the phenobarb'.

'It sounds sad, but he is a very happy fella' who really enjoys life and is a joy to be around, even if he does specialize in getting us dirty. I can't wait to get my boat project finished so we can go exploring. I think he'll make a great boat dog (siezures and all). uh-oh, here he comes now!

Iceboy
04-30-2004, 09:24 AM
Well Petey is home adain. Docs couldn't determine the cause of all this in one day so am waiting for the vet school to give us an appointment. In the meantime we will watch him closely. Thanks to all who replied and to those that have pets with seizures good luck with your furry friends and wishes that every thing will work out for the best.