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Ian McColgin
01-18-2004, 01:07 PM
Imagine my surprise that Massachusetts didn't make the cut:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JANUARY 16, 2004
8:06 AM

CONTACT: Corporate Crime Reporter
Russell Mokhiber at (202) 737-1680
http://www.corporatecrimereporter.com/

Report Ranks States from Most Corrupt to Least Corrupt

WASHINGTON - January 16 - Mississippi is the most corrupt state in the United States, and Nebraska is the least corrupt, according to a first-ever ranking of the states released today by Corporate Crime Reporter. Corporate Crime Reporter is a legal newsletter based in Washington, D.C. According to the report, Public Corruption in the United States, the ten most corrupt states in the country are: Mississippi, North Dakota, Louisiana, Alaska, Illinois, Montana, South Dakota, Kentucky, Florida, and New York. The ten least corrupt states in the country are: Nebraska, Oregon, New Hampshire, Iowa, Colorado, Utah, Minnesota, Arizona, Arkansas, and Wisconsin. The 50 states were ranked by corruption rate - number of public corruption convictions in the state over a ten-year period (1993 to 2002) per 100,000 population.

The report is being released at a time when public corruption scandals are breaking out all over the country. The former Governor of Illinois, George Ryan, has been charged with taking money, gifts and loans in exchange for handing out state contracts to his donors. In Connecticut, three mayors and the state treasurer are in jail or heading to jail. And the Governor is under siege in a soap opera of a corruption scandal. The last three insurance commissioners in Louisiana have gone to jail for corruption. "We need not just strong economies, but strong political economies - reporters, citizen groups, prosecutors, judges, religious leaders - who are willing to speak out about the rampant corruption in our midst," said Russell Mokhiber, editor of Corporate Crime Reporter and author of the report. "Connecticut, for example, has a strong economy and an educated citizenry. But its political economy has historically been weak, with little public debate about the level of corruption around it - until federal prosecutors at the U.S. Attorney's office in Hartford decided to force the issue out into the open." Mokhiber called on Attorney General John Ashcroft to stop muzzling his line attorneys at the Public Integrity Section, which is in charge of combating public corruption. "They want to speak out on the issue, to shed some light, but they are being muzzled in an election year," Mokhiber charged.

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oldriverat
01-18-2004, 01:33 PM
From what I've seen, The corruption in Mississippi mostly exists at the local and state level of government. Politicians being bought, sherrifs being bought... etc. It's a poor state. people are tempted.

Tunica county for example lies just South of Memphis. It's where the casinos are located. It also has the lowest conviction rate in the entire state for drunk driving. When questioned about this the sherrif said his deputies would never show up for court to press charges. I can just guess why and I bet it involves a payoff.

True Love
01-18-2004, 03:04 PM
Oh please,

How did California, Pennsylvania and New Jersey not make the most corrupt top 10? North Dakota? xplain that one, Lucy.

John Bell
01-18-2004, 04:02 PM
Based on public corruption convictions per 100,000 population. ND, MT, SD, and AK don't have that many people, so it does'nt take too many convictions to jack them up in the rankings. I'd say this statistic isn't the greatest yardstick ever conceived. Pretty lazy on the part of the whoever put it out... :(

High C
01-18-2004, 04:41 PM
Louisiana has fallen from the #1 spot! Actually, we've made great strides in recent years. Former Governor Edwin Edwards was finally put in prison where he should've been decades ago, We've enjoyed 8 years of Governor Mike Foster's corruption-free leadership, and the city of New Orleans elected a political outsider, Ray Nagin, as its mayor. Nagin has come out swinging at corruption, rolling heads left and right. Some of these fine folks are Republican, some are Democrat. Both parties here are making progress against corruption, and I'm damned proud to be from Louisiana, for a change. :cool:

And Cajun Jake DelHomme is in the NFC Championship game tonight as Carolina's quarterback! Go Panthers! :cool:

Andrew Craig-Bennett
01-18-2004, 04:46 PM
Yes, I noticed that Louisiana has fallen from the top spot.

I cherish a memory of a dinner in a very grand New Orleans restaurant, twenty years ago. I was there to place a multi million dollar wreck removal contract. My firm's lawyers were a very eminent New Orleans firm of maritime attorneys. At dinner the partner handling my business turned to me and remarked:

"New Orleans is a brother-in-law kind of a town. Most of us round this table have been married three or four times!"

High C
01-18-2004, 05:26 PM
Originally posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett:

I cherish a memory of a dinner in a very grand New Orleans restaurant, twenty years ago. I was there to place a multi million dollar wreck removal contract. My firm's lawyers were a very eminent New Orleans firm of maritime attorneys. At dinner the partner handling my business turned to me and remarked:

"New Orleans is a brother-in-law kind of a town. Most of us round this table have been married three or four times!"That's a rich story, Andrew. Do you remember the name of the restaurant? Galatoire's or Antoine's, I bet? smile.gif

And New Orleans is a grand and elegant city, at its heart. We like to think of it as being quite European, too. She's a troubled city, but has great resilience. I would still live there were it not so unsafe for my children. :(

Bruce Hooke
01-18-2004, 05:30 PM
Originally posted by John Bell:
Based on public corruption convictions per 100,000 population. ND, MT, SD, and AK don't have that many people, so it does'nt take too many convictions to jack them up in the rankings. I'd say this statistic isn't the greatest yardstick ever conceived. Pretty lazy on the part of the whoever put it out... :( Ummm, I think other arguments could be made against their yardstick, but I don't think the issue of state population holds much water. Many of the least corrupt states have fairly low populations and among the most corrupt states are some of the real big hitters in terms of population, including 3 of the 5 most populous states in the country.

The biggest hole I see in their yardstick is that lots of convictions for corruption could in fact mean that the state is not that corrupt because it is vigorous in prosecuting any corruption that does occur.

High C
01-18-2004, 05:44 PM
Originally posted by Bruce Hooke:
The biggest hole I see in their yardstick is that lots of convictions for corruption could in fact mean that the state is not that corrupt because it is vigorous in prosecuting any corruption that does occur.Bingo! Corruption flourishes when everyone looks the way.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
01-18-2004, 06:10 PM
Originally posted by High C:

That's a rich story, Andrew. Do you remember the name of the restaurant? Galatoire's or Antoine's, I bet? smile.gif

And New Orleans is a grand and elegant city, at its heart. We like to think of it as being quite European, too. She's a troubled city, but has great resilience. I would still live there were it not so unsafe for my children. :( [/QB]It was a very grand restaurant, serving French cuisine in the local style - I want to call it "cajun" but I think there may be another word for it. I recall it as being a low building, and we were sitting at a large circular table. I was being skilfully piloted through an absolute viper's nest of people who wanted to make a "cut" out of the situation - a Dutch ship - the Happy Runner - had capsized whilst loading a pipe laybarge stinger, a little below the Huey Long Bridge.

I have very fond memories of New Orleans, but I have done business there twice since then and always felt a little uneasy.

carioca1232001
01-19-2004, 04:28 AM
My first trip to New York City took place in summer 1978.

A group of us went out one night to the COPACABANA night club in the Queen´s district(Carmen Miranda, a Rio-born Brazilian show-bizz and Hollywood star of the early 50´s made her US debut at this very place).

At around 10:30 pm that night, a pair of middle-aged men of swarthy complexion, impeccably dressed in light-coloured summer suits, graciously started making their way down into the mainstay of the club.

They were distributing smiles and nodding their heads to the sheer reverence paid them by the staff and management, who were by then running all over the place making way for the distinguished guests.

Needless to say, the band brought their music to an abrupt halt .......... Everyone was mesmerised, including myself.

When the hullabaloo subsided, we managed to ask a waiter what all this was about and he whispered in our ears: "They are the Mafia bosses of the Queen´s district !"

I thought for a moment ...... here in one of the world´s top-ten cities, overseen by the Statue of Liberty........... the film "The Godfather" launched in the early 70´s seemed true to life !

Meerkat
01-19-2004, 03:03 PM
Originally posted by High C:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Bruce Hooke:
The biggest hole I see in their yardstick is that lots of convictions for corruption could in fact mean that the state is not that corrupt because it is vigorous in prosecuting any corruption that does occur.Bingo! Corruption flourishes when everyone looks the way.</font>[/QUOTE]That would tend to explain why Texass isn't at the top of the list. On the other hand, everything comeing out of Texass is so mediocre, that might explain it too.

carioca1232001
01-19-2004, 04:26 PM
Meerkat wrote:


....On the other hand, everything comeing out of Texass is so mediocre, that might explain it too Notable exceptions being made for Texas Instruments (TI) and MOSTEK Corp., who in the late 70´s/early 80´s, were the principal forerunners of MOS-intergrated-circuit technology, and for the subsequent impact that this had on the "electronic" industry !

Sam F
01-19-2004, 04:47 PM
Originally posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett:

I have very fond memories of New Orleans, but I have done business there twice since then and always felt a little uneasy.Unfortunately I don't. I used to do a bit of work in NeuOlyns smile.gif and always thought it was an armpit. When visiting, my only salve from worry was that I was too poor to be an attractive target. It was there I had the dubious honor of meeting and conversing with Carlos Marcello then the local mafia chief. Much to my relief we didn’t hit it off. ;)

carioca1232001
01-19-2004, 05:12 PM
I was in New Orleans just once, way back in 1995 for 10 days on business.

Some memorable times on Bourbon Street and some beautiful Southern mansions to gaze at, but overall seemed rather down to earth, humid, hot and sticky !

A few years later I asked a Louisiana firm to supply a quotation via Internet for diesel engine parts - their quote was rather hefty !

So I requested for alternate quotes from Florida suppliers also via Internet.

Will you believe it if I said, that the Louisiana firm was monitoring my Internet activity - and that everytime a competitor tried to send me an alternate quote, they would intercept the transaction and block him out ??

VERY SCARY :rolleyes: , as this had never happened to me before and never has had since !

Ross M
01-19-2004, 06:04 PM
"It was a very grand restaurant, serving French cuisine in the local style - I want to call it "cajun" but I think there may be another word for it."

Creole, perhaps?

JimD
01-19-2004, 06:09 PM
Which ever state is most corrupt I hope it applies for official status with the Guiness Book of World Records. Otherwise, what's the point?

Andrew Craig-Bennett
01-19-2004, 06:12 PM
Originally posted by Ross McDonough:
"It was a very grand restaurant, serving French cuisine in the local style - I want to call it "cajun" but I think there may be another word for it."

Creole, perhaps?Thanks, Ross. Le mot juste.