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View Full Version : Things I hate about America,,,,,



Magwitch
01-08-2005, 05:18 PM
Pop Tarts, I can do without scalding the inside of my mouth with boiling jam.
Baseball caps. One size fits all? No it bloody well doesn't.
The MacDonalds star system. Isn't it humiliating enough for people to work there without patronising them with plastic 'gold' stars? ,,,,,,,,,,,
IanW

JimD
01-08-2005, 05:20 PM
I hate them because they are free

Magwitch
01-08-2005, 05:28 PM
Originally posted by JimD:
I hate them because they are freeFree? I'll take a dozen,
IanW

JimD
01-08-2005, 05:57 PM
Only the pop tarts are free, and then only with the coupon

Memphis Mike
01-08-2005, 06:00 PM
Plain and simple, Englishmen are snobs. Not too bright either. Who else would take 30 dogs, 30 horses and 30 men to chase down and kill one Red Fox? :rolleyes:

[ 01-08-2005, 11:07 PM: Message edited by: Memphis Mike ]

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
01-08-2005, 06:13 PM
Is that all? :D
Well we think you guys talk funny. tongue.gif

brad9798
01-08-2005, 07:27 PM
my baseball hats are all fitted ... there goes that assumption! ;)

captain's gig
01-08-2005, 07:34 PM
The monopoly money, the only thing missing from the dollar bill is the little guy in the tux and top hat.

Stiletto
01-08-2005, 08:38 PM
The English arent snobs, ask anybody,
well, anybody who matters. :D

LeeG
01-08-2005, 09:08 PM
I'm still learning what it is,,haven't found anything to hate. poptarts? if you get one to stay in a toaster too long it's a pretty good flame.

DavesFlatsBoat
01-08-2005, 10:54 PM
Okay, we've foisted Pop-Tarts on you, but you gave us sexy two-seat roadsters filling us with lust, only to find cooling and electrical systems from the late 19th Century :(

Q: Why did the British consumer electronics industry fail?

A: They couldn't get their TVs to leak oil!!!!

Memphis Mike
01-08-2005, 11:06 PM
Originally posted by Norske3:
Hey MM...who are the E N G I S H M E N?

I LIKE THE ENGLISH....NOT ALL, ONLY THE FRIENDLY CHAPS....I SAY! I THINK THEIR "SPOT ON"!....one word they over work is .."EXTRAORDINARY"Correction made. :D

Meerkat
01-09-2005, 03:55 AM
Originally posted by Memphis Mike:
Plain and simple, Englishmen are snobs. Not too bright either. Who else would take 30 dogs, 30 horses and 30 men to chase down and kill one Red Fox? :rolleyes: Rednecks - only the fox was a slave. :D

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
01-09-2005, 06:40 AM
I thought Red Foxx was already dead?
You mean to tell me it was the English that killed him?
Poor Lamont. :D

http://www.geocities.com/TimesSquare/Maze/3101/102.jpg

[ 01-09-2005, 06:45 AM: Message edited by: Mr. Know It All ]

Jack Heinlen
01-09-2005, 10:42 AM
I despise much of American culture, but I love the freedom. It is, to paraphrase Leonard Cohen, both the best and the worst.

Propose a better arrangement? We have Bob Dylan and Brittany Spears, McDonalds and the finest beer in the world.

The offense I take also makes me laugh. People must be left to their folly in order for a higher order to emerge.

[ 01-09-2005, 05:30 PM: Message edited by: Jack Heinlen ]

carioca1232001
01-09-2005, 10:59 AM
Jack Heinlen wrote:


......It is, to paraphrase Leonard Cohen, both the best and the worst.....
The above, plus your closing note on how laughter may be brought on to neutralise offense, brings to mind JK Galbraith´s celebrated 1960´s book : "The Affluent Society"

John Meachen
01-09-2005, 01:33 PM
I'm glad to see that you have the finest beer in the world.Where do you import it from?

Jack Heinlen
01-09-2005, 01:40 PM
Come check it out John. For whatever reason, wealth I suppose, Americans are brewing it, the best beer in the world.

WWheeler
01-09-2005, 05:27 PM
I'm glad to see that you have the finest beer in the world. That's English humour at its finest.

yorgie
01-09-2005, 05:34 PM
The beer in america is like everything else.They have the best and the worst.Unfortunately most people like to consume the worst.

Magwitch
01-09-2005, 07:12 PM
Originally posted by John Meachen:
I'm glad to see that you have the finest beer in the world.Where do you import it from?Woodbridge ,,,,,,,,,,,

IanW

captain's gig
01-09-2005, 08:01 PM
I heard a rumor that Guinness Stout is now being brewed in Liverpool, and is no longer in production at St. James Gate, say it ain't so.

Jamaica Mike
01-09-2005, 08:14 PM
Originally posted by Memphis Mike:
Plain and simple, Englishmen are snobs. Not too bright either. Who else would take 30 dogs, 30 horses and 30 men to chase down and kill one Red Fox? :rolleyes: Too late. Fox hunting with hounds is now illegal in the UK.

skuthorp
01-10-2005, 01:46 AM
Starbucks (alleged) coffee! YUK!!!!
Actually I dont think theyr'e doing too well here.
We are spoiled for good, cheap coffee
:cool: :cool:

doorstop
01-10-2005, 03:07 AM
I reckon the bugers shood all be nyuked on accounta they carnt spell or speek English good!

skuthorp
01-10-2005, 03:12 AM
Ar! the wuners uv publik ejacashun, :eek:

martin schulz
01-10-2005, 04:40 AM
Originally posted by Jack Heinlen:
Come check it out John. For whatever reason, wealth I suppose, Americans are brewing it, the best beer in the world.???

Scott Rosen
01-10-2005, 10:40 AM
Originally posted by Magwitch:
Baseball caps. One size fits all? No it bloody well doesn't.I'll bet 99 of 100 people don't know their own hat size. (I don't mean 'medium' or 'large.')

Magwitch
01-10-2005, 10:50 AM
Originally posted by Scott Rosen:
[QUOTE]I'll bet 99 of 100 people don't know their own hat size. (I don't mean 'medium' or 'large.')7 3/16, depending on haircut, but that was 'cos the Army needed to know. smile.gif

IanW

Jack Heinlen
01-10-2005, 11:15 AM
Martin,

I said that not from experience(though I have a bit) but from listening to a fellow on the radio a month ago who made a study of beer in America. He even wrote a book about his travels in our small breweries. Apparently -- and Europeans are free to dispute, vocally ;) -- the boutique culture of the middle and upper middle class in this country has created a climate for beer that is unparalleled the world over. It has drawn brewmasters from everywhere, even Germany I suspect, who seeing that good flash of affluence love the resulting adulation at the tap.

Commercial American brews still suck, but there are literally thousands of small breweries that have popped up in the last twenty years, and they sling some pretty good suds.

captain's gig
01-10-2005, 07:34 PM
Go brew yourself Jack.

Just kidding, you are absolutely right, a sudden reversal in fortunes in beer and real ale has been heaped upon the thirsty masses. So to give credit where credit is due, cheers.

Try Sierra Nevada, Geary's , Pete's wicked , Sam Adams even.. the list is growing and shrinking, but the end result is good brew. Boston , Portland, Denver and San Francisco are the main contendas for American beer Mecca.

[ 01-10-2005, 07:37 PM: Message edited by: captain's gig ]

carioca1232001
01-10-2005, 10:49 PM
The Beer Mania has also proliferated in Brazil.

Some 25 years ago,we had just two brands BRAHMA (named after a Hindu deity!) and ANTARCTICA.

The above two recently merged to form a mega-beer-conglomerate named AmBev, that created/acquired another half-a dozen or so brands under its umbrella, besides teaming up with beer producers in Canada (Labatts)and Scandinavia.

All this has motivated a dozen or so small beer producers to produce speciality beers for the market, while we all get sozzled for a fraction of what you pay up North, South, East or West for that matter :D

While this circus goes on, sales of CACHAÇA (ca-sha-ssa)spirit have hit an all time low :rolleyes:

High C
01-10-2005, 11:25 PM
Originally posted by captain's gig:
...a sudden reversal in fortunes in beer and real ale has been heaped upon the thirsty masses...try Sierra Nevada, Geary's, Pete's wicked, Sam Adams even.. the list is growing and shrinking, but the end result is good brew... It's true, it's true! And our local favorite, Abita Beer in its several variants, Bock, Red Ale, Amber, Turbo Dog, Wheat, etc.... :cool:

Bob Smalser
01-10-2005, 11:51 PM
Many American boutique "beers" are actually top-fermented ales with the thin, weak taste of our larger commercial brews...a good cross between ant piss and dishwater with a mild hops and malt bouquet.

I'll take fresh, rich and tangy Czech or German Pilsner, thanks....those and snap-brim driving caps about the only uses I have at all for Olde Europe, most of whom could use American lessons on personal hygiene and dental care as well...

... although even the worst German coffee is better than Starbucks and Scnellebissen beat McJunkFood's hands down.

[ 01-11-2005, 12:26 AM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

martin schulz
01-11-2005, 03:26 AM
Bob - you are a man of my liking.

Don't forget the German purity laws

Popeye
01-11-2005, 08:33 AM
Bob Beermeister quote'th..


Many American boutique "beers" are actually top-fermented ales with the thin, weak taste of our larger commercial brews...a good cross between ant piss and dishwater with a mild hops and malt bouquet.

I'll take fresh, rich and tangy Czech or German Pilsner, thanks

Actually Bob, you are half correct, some of the major breweries have been trying to badge engineer the craft brew industry. But, in the words of Mr Daltry, we won't be fooled again. Get out to the grungy little pubs around the small brew towns and you will experience the real ale phenom Dan is talking about.

OTOH, Czech Pilsner Urquell is considered , by the beer snobs, to be the finest example of pilsner style lager in the world.

Cheers.

Garrett Lowell
01-11-2005, 09:08 AM
And then there's Old Dominion Brewey. (http://www.olddominion.com/)

My personal favorites are Tupper's Hop Pocket Ale, Tupper's Hop Pocket Pilsner, and Tupper's Real Ale for when I'm actually at the brewery. They also have what is affectionately known as a "Growler". A growler is a half gallon container of your favorite freshly brewed beer. Thirteen dollars is the deposit, and 5 to fill it up, and for each successive refill.

I'm also partial to Victoria's Bitter, and a German Pilsner which my Danish neighbor brought to my home once, but I cannot just now recall the name (starts with an R).

As far as the German purity law is concerned, I personally know nothing about it. But this same Danish neigbor of mine (his wife is German) attended University in Hamburg. He complained that the law is quite restrictive, and while he enjoys a certain Bavarian style of beer called lachaf or lachar or something like that, this style cannot be brewed under the purity law.

Bob Smalser
01-11-2005, 09:13 AM
A major sport during the larger annual NATO exercises (about 8-fold the number of troops in the "Coalition of the Willing") was beer glass collecting. Each European brewery has their own distinctive beer glass, many of whose logos have been in existence since the Middle Ages.

It was also a training event in local language and dialect/accent, tact, and persuasive leadership in addition to land navigation.

A battalion would make a list of all the troops who wanted beer glasses from the exercise area. Those with jeeps during the recon trips prior to the exercise would scout the breweries...usually along river bottoms with distinctive smoke stacks, vats and odors. We'd plot them all on a map overlay reproduced on jelly rolls, assign sectors to sub units, and issue a written, mimeo'd OPORDER that included necessary German phrases in the local dialect.

Sub unit commanders were required to have their unit visit each brewery during the exercise, obtaining the number of cases of glasses required to cover all the club members....either by cajoling and flattering the brewery owner or by outright buying them if necessary...usually $.25/each.

How he came up with any necessary money was his problem...usually they passed the hat in the sub unit, which was an incentive to work harder on their persuasive leadership and leadership development skills to put the smoothest talker, not necessarily the commander, in the jeep.

Cases were stacked in a specially-padded 1 1/2T trailer rigged for the occasion and distributed at the end of the 30-day exercise by the S-4 Section.

Fragile....but I still have 100 or so from every region of West Germany that have survived after almost 30 years.

"Hier, Frauline." "Ein Pils, bitte." "Ein Mal, bitte." were always the NATO soldier's very first native words.

[ 01-11-2005, 10:26 AM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

uncas
01-11-2005, 11:46 AM
Magwitch!
Read the back of the poptarts box....It has a warning...Hot when heated.... :D

martin schulz
01-12-2005, 04:03 AM
Originally posted by Garrett Lowell:
As far as the German purity law is concerned, I personally know nothing about it. But this same Danish neigbor of mine (his wife is German) attended University in Hamburg. He complained that the law is quite restrictive, and while he enjoys a certain Bavarian style of beer called lachaf or lachar or something like that, this style cannot be brewed under the purity law.Garrett, as with other great products that are not altogether corrupted with chemicals by the industry for various reasons ( artificial flavour, storage life, diversification) the German Purity Law is quite simple:


"...we wish to emphasize that in future in all cities, markets and in the country, the only ingredients used for the brewing of beer must be Barley, Hops and Water. Whosoever knowingly disregards or transgresses upon this ordinance, shall be punished by the Court authorities' confiscating such barrels of beer, without fail.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
01-12-2005, 04:18 AM
As reparations for damages suffered in the uprising of the Society of Righteous Fists, also known as the Boxer Rebellion, Germany was accorded treaty port privileges at the port of Tsingtao (Qingdao in Pinyin transliteration).

The Germans lost no time in building a suitably Hanseatic Town Hall and Cathedral, some rather pleasant suburbs and of course a brewery which brewed beer according to the Beer Purity Law.

To this day, Qingdao retains a rather oddly Germanic look and feel - you might almost be on the Baltic coast of Germany - and rather a lot of beer is brewed there...