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Ed Harrow
06-19-2001, 11:27 PM
"Yesterday I had one of the best boat building days ever, and a hand plane had a lot to do with it. I was rounding the mast for my pram, and my seven year-old daughter wanted to help. We needed to get it from eight sided to round. We started with a 9.5"
smooth plane and finished with a low-angle block plane. The smooth plane is a Buck Brothers and cost me less than $30.00 new.

I showed her how to use the smooth plane to take down the corners, and she loved it. It took her less than five minutes to get the feel for it. She really enjoyed the heft of the tool and liked that she could use the tool's mass to do most of the work. I thought
she'd get bored or tired after a few minutes, but I was wrong. She worked with me for several hours. And she didn't want to give up
her turn with the plane. She loved making the shavings and the eel and smell of the wood. She also liked rubbing her hands on the mast as she worked, to feel the transition from hard-sided to round. When it was my turn at the plane, she asked me if she could pick up the shavings and save them in a bag. She wanted to use them for her sister's mouse cage. At one point she asked me, "Would the mast completely disappear if we kept planing?"

Then she told me I should be a boat builder."

When we were done, she went back to her Barbie dolls and other girl toys. But I wouldn't give up that day for all of the Herreshoffs ever built."

Thanks, Scott, it reminded me of memories of my own...

Paul
06-20-2001, 08:04 AM
My 9 year old daughter has helped me a lot during the construction of my Haven. She has sanded, varnished, painted and been my third hand many times. Whenever she has a friend over and I'm working on the boat, she will always bring them over and ask if I will let them climb aboard (I always do). She starts telling her friend all about the boat and about that time I tell her friend how much Molly (my daughter) has helped me. Her eyes light up and she just beams. All this and more! Isn't it great!

Bateau Boy
06-20-2001, 08:18 AM
Be careful not to let children epoxy and paint at young ages. It makes them look funny later in life.

Paul
06-20-2001, 09:32 AM
That goes without saying.

Barrett Faneuf
06-20-2001, 01:04 PM
Yes; if you're not careful, you can end up with a kid that gets this crazed expression of her face and installs hatches on the boat at 3:30 in the morning before the boat is to be launched. Go see attached sample.

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1445147&a=11152731&p=50660785

Boat crazy kid,
Barrett

Scott Rosen
06-20-2001, 01:12 PM
Great picture, Barrett. But don't try to blame that silly, punch-drunk look on the late hour. I've seen that look on any number of wooden boat nuts, at any hour of the day.

Bruce Taylor
06-20-2001, 06:05 PM
My little guys aren't much use around the shop, but they helped keep the boat hidden from their mom until the moulds were up and the keel half made.

none
06-20-2001, 06:12 PM
hay Barrett,
I saw that same look at 3:00 A.M. a few weeks ago....of course sherri's sobor now...lol

Barrett Faneuf
06-21-2001, 02:48 PM
The truly frightening thing is, I don't even drink. That look was pure loopiness/exhaustion/glee. Will that admission (the sober bit) get me kicked out of the club? I just don't like the taste of any alcohol. My dad thinks just the opposite, but I think that a good stout is just great......driveway sealant.

I think I do that looks far more often than the legally sane limit. I'm certainly never going to mount a mirror in the shop. Except maybe as a backer for sandpaper sharpening....

-Barrett

ishmael
06-21-2001, 03:15 PM
Aw shucks. I was hoping for a picture of Scott Rosen in that picture post. Is the original lovely meditation on boats and daughters Scott R's? Nice, whomever.

seafox
06-21-2001, 04:40 PM
Hey Barrett
that means the boat is launched ? I see no loopyness in that photo simple beautiful happyness. the kind I would wish for every boat builder
jeffery

seafox
06-21-2001, 04:44 PM
Also what size gusset plates did you use going from the vertical to the sloped 2x lumber and what was the fastening schedual?
thankyou
jeffery

Barrett Faneuf
06-21-2001, 05:51 PM
Hi seafox,

Yes, the boat got launched. I just put together a new gallery of pictures and will start a new thread regarding them.

As for the construction of the boat shed, you'd have to ask Ross, 'cause I wasn't there at building time. I'd hazard a guess it's 3/8 or 1/2 ply with about 8-12 speed screws each, each side of the gusset. At the time (last August) I was more concerned with not cracking my head on the rafters more times than was absolutely necessary. Launch day was the first time any of us had seen her from a far angle, let alone be able to stand upright on her deck.

Ross Faneuf
06-22-2001, 02:32 AM
The gussets are 5/8 roof deck ply fastened with 1 1/2" air nails and construction adhesive. Nails are spaced about 4", there are maybe 20 each side of the gussets. Uprights are 2x6 and rafters are 2x8. Roof is 2x4 stringers spaced 2' with Ondura roofing. Siding is T111 9' length with translucent Ondura fiberglass panels to finish last 1' of 10' sides. There is a 2x8 stringer at the top of the uprights. Bents are spaced 2', shed is 41'x18', with about 16' vertical clearance under the 2x6 collar ties on the rafters. Ceol Mor is 36'L by 11'W by about 12' depth, and just fits with room to work on her.

[This message has been edited by Ross Faneuf (edited 06-22-2001).]

Garrett Lowell
03-10-2005, 09:12 AM
Originally posted by Ed Harrow:
"Yesterday I had one of the best boat building days ever, and a hand plane had a lot to do with it. I was rounding the mast for my pram, and my seven year-old daughter wanted to help. We needed to get it from eight sided to round. We started with a 9.5"
smooth plane and finished with a low-angle block plane. The smooth plane is a Buck Brothers and cost me less than $30.00 new.

I showed her how to use the smooth plane to take down the corners, and she loved it. It took her less than five minutes to get the feel for it. She really enjoyed the heft of the tool and liked that she could use the tool's mass to do most of the work. I thought
she'd get bored or tired after a few minutes, but I was wrong. She worked with me for several hours. And she didn't want to give up
her turn with the plane. She loved making the shavings and the eel and smell of the wood. She also liked rubbing her hands on the mast as she worked, to feel the transition from hard-sided to round. When it was my turn at the plane, she asked me if she could pick up the shavings and save them in a bag. She wanted to use them for her sister's mouse cage. At one point she asked me, "Would the mast completely disappear if we kept planing?"

Then she told me I should be a boat builder."

When we were done, she went back to her Barbie dolls and other girl toys. But I wouldn't give up that day for all of the Herreshoffs ever built."

Thanks, Scott, it reminded me of memories of my own...So nice.