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Rick Tyler
12-20-2005, 12:28 AM
I liked Peter's "Five People" thread. How about this one:

You have a time machine the size of a standard shipping container. You get to make one trip backwards in history. You get to return with whatever fits in the container. How do you use your machine? Remember, only one trip.

Art Read
12-20-2005, 02:32 AM
"Alerion", fresh out of the Master's boatshop. (Second choice, a container full of original issue, "Standard Oil" stock certificates... ;) )

Art Read
12-20-2005, 02:38 AM
Best choice, "Alerion" padded with then current "Standard Oil" stock certificates! :D

paladin
12-20-2005, 11:58 AM
back to 1880...pack the container with silver bar (.35 oz) return to late 1980's when Hunt brothers boosted it to 58 bucks an oz...more bang fer the buck....

Art Read
12-20-2005, 12:10 PM
Done the math, Chuck? Just curious, but I wonder... Silver's pretty bulky. You could fit A LOT of pieces of paper into that container in place of your $58 ounces of silver!

(Not sure, but I suspect that just one of those certificates would be considerably more valuable than $58! Protect the boat better too! ;) )

[ 12-20-2005, 12:20 PM: Message edited by: Art Read ]

paladin
12-20-2005, 12:35 PM
i larned a long time ago that metal don't respond to termites like paper.......
I bought 3000 oz of silver fer 1.68 and oz 'cause I got stuck with a wad of unconvertable local currency in Singapore...sold it at 57 bucks an oz during Hunt brothers scam....know a lotta folks that lost their fannies by buying "futures" or other stocks...iron good..paper bad...

George.
12-20-2005, 12:39 PM
I'd go to Athens, circa 430 BC, and pick up a few odds and ends at garage sales... ;)

huisjen
12-20-2005, 12:49 PM
I'd grab the 9/11 hijackers out of the Boston Terminal.

Or maybe remove Osama Bin Laden's kidney machine at a crucial moment.

Another thought: What if someone stole every last first edition copy of Mein Kampf somewhere between when they were paid for at the printers and when they were distibuted? Somebody would be out printing costs, and probably unable to come up with the money again.

Dan

[ 12-20-2005, 12:58 PM: Message edited by: huisjen ]

Rick Tyler
12-20-2005, 12:57 PM
Heh. I was thinking of items of historical interest, but I suppose that money is good, too.

Of course, if I followed my plan of clearing out the Library of Alexndria the day before the fire, it might have certain financial advantages. How much would museums, universities, and private libraries pay for ancient manuscripts like these? It might even be worth more than Standard Oil stock certificates.

George.
12-20-2005, 01:45 PM
Originally posted by Rick Tyler:
How much would museums, universities, and private libraries pay for ancient manuscripts like these? It might even be worth more than Standard Oil stock certificates.I was thinking the same about unchipped Phidias sculptures and intact pottery... ;)

Joe (SoCal)
12-20-2005, 01:51 PM
Pick up yesterdays lottery ticket with the correct numbers for todays multi million dollar winning ticket ;)

Art Read
12-20-2005, 01:55 PM
But, Joe, EVERYBODY knows that lottery winners ALWAYS wind up broke, drunk and lonely within a few years of winning! ;)

Keith Wilson
12-20-2005, 01:56 PM
The second volume of Aristotle's Poetics?

It would probably be in the Alexandria Library though. I like that idea a lot.

Alternately you could go to China and pick up a bunch of books before Qin Shi Huangdi burned them.

Rick Tyler
12-20-2005, 02:12 PM
Originally posted by Art Read:
But, Joe, EVERYBODY knows that lottery winners ALWAYS wind up broke, drunk and lonely within a few years of winning! ;) I suppose it's a risk, but one I'd be willing to take -- just to show it could be done successfully.

ishmael
12-20-2005, 03:00 PM
Well, since you guys have the library at Alexandria covered, I'm going after the Maya library from before the Spanish conquest. The conquistadores burned thousands of books(codices). Only a handful still remain, IIRC, and from what they tell us the missing books were likely of history, astronomy, religion and culture. Quite a group of fellows, pretty different from our culture of European extract. Sophisticated boogers. It would be interesting to hear their pre-Columbian side of the story.

One of their great cycles of time is about to expire, in 2012.

Dave Fleming
12-20-2005, 03:08 PM
A load of D R Barton, L&IJ White, Campbell Bros, Whitherby, James Swan, Auburn Tool, Newman Machine, Oliver Machine, L Power Machine and last but not least C Drew.

Ah.... smile.gif

Noah
12-20-2005, 03:08 PM
This sounds like Bill & Ted's excellent adventure...

Rick Tyler
12-20-2005, 03:16 PM
The Americas -- good notion. How about a load of pre-Columbian artifacts? The Spaniards got most of their Incan gold and silver by melting down Incan statues and jewelry and, well, stuff. There are relatively few intact samples of pre-Incan and Incan smithing left.

ishmael
12-20-2005, 04:48 PM
No harm if a little gold and silver sticks. smile.gif As you said, it's about to be melted down to feed the Galeons, so why not? While we're at it, a few well-versed priests to act as translators of the books would be a good idea. That Mayan glypho-rama is a bit tricky, as I recall.

Victor
12-20-2005, 09:16 PM
Interesting! Some guys would just go back to make a buck, and some would go back to find out something interesting. Me, I'd go back to 15,000 BC and see what was happening before God was invented.