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Mrleft8
12-14-2004, 08:29 AM
My mother's new book is due out in early January. Anyone interested in industrial history might want to take a look...

A meticulous look at the distinctive industrialization of New Haven, Connecticut.

In Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks, the editors and contributors trace the rise and fall of New Haven, Connecticut, as an industrial city. While New Haven’s story is typical of many thriving cities during the American Industrial Revolution—fascinating to preservationists, urban and landscape historians, architects, industrial archaeologists, and community historians—it is atypical as well. Most American industrial cities relied on the manufacture of a single product, but New Haven diversified, fabricating over one hundred assorted manufactured goods at the turn of the twentieth century. In a remarkable feat of historical continuity, Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks explores the origins, preservation, reclamation, and reuse of the extant industrial sites and firmly iterates a unique sense of place for modern citizens of this post-industrial city. Five scholarly narrative essays interpret specific sites, and detailed historical profiles are included for sixteen selected industrial sites located on or near New Haven's harbor, including the Quinnipiac Brewery and the Candee Rubber Company. More than one hundred historically significant illustrations depict historical and modern views of sites, the products manufactured there, and New Haven’s working people. Maps and tables illustrate the progress of the city’s urban development from the seventeenth through the mid-twentieth centuries. Based on primary source material including land and fire department records, city directories, newspaper articles, maps, and personal accounts, this book is the culmination of the Industrial Heritage Project of the New Haven Preservation Trust’s mission to evaluate and document the city’s historic industrial sites and to produce educational and advocacy programs for preservation efforts.



FROM THE BOOK

"[W]hat most distinguished New Haven among Connecticut’s industrial cities and towns was not its dominance in making one particular product but rather its diversity of manufacturing. Not only did the city produce an astonishing number of different products, but in several areas one or more New Haven rms were among the largest manufacturers in the state, if not the nation . . . New Haven’s industrial past remains clearly visible in the physical fabric of the city: railroad tracks running down the middle of streets, brick factory complexes suddenly springing into view, and large tracts of nineteenth-century working class houses all continue to command our attention. The city today is, in great part, a product of a period of substantial prosperity based upon manufacturing, and we cannot fully appreciate what New Haven has become in the twenty-first century without an understanding of the city’s industrial past.” -- From the Introduction



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

PRESTON MAYNARD, as Vice President and Community Development Officer for the Community Economic Development Fund directs a foundation grant and technical assistance program that aids urban communities with redevelopment projects. He is former Executive Director of the New Haven Preservation Trust and an advisor to the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

MARJORIE B. NOYES has been an editor of publications for the Yale Schools of Art and Architecture, the Yale School of Medicine, the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, the New Haven Trust for Historic Preservation, and numerous other nonprofit organizations. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the New Haven Preservation Trust and the Guilford (CT) Preservation Alliance.

uncas
12-14-2004, 08:42 AM
Mrleft8
Sounds like an interesting book...Having grown up in New Haven and coming from many generations in Guilford, I think I will find it a good read.
jamj

J. Dillon
12-14-2004, 08:43 AM
Hey Doug,

Where were you at the opening on Sunday? I was there and didn't make the connection. Great book and give her my sincere congratulations. I lookded it over page by page. :D :D

What does it go for ? One gent at the intro's said that presently there were only 3 in CT. :(

Noticed it was printed in Singapore. :confused:

Are any of the remaining buildings in the way of the new Q bridge ? ( Pearl Harbor Memorial bridge it's proper name)

BTW was any of your stuff at the shop show room???? :confused:
JD

Donn
12-14-2004, 08:49 AM
Per your editor comment on the other thread...I can identify. I used to religiously avoid working on books that had more than one. Like herding cats.

Jack Heinlen
12-14-2004, 08:56 AM
I once read a fascinating memoir of a small town in MA, where I used to live. Late 18th. century. I was amazed at what they made there. Shoes, barrels, wagons, harnesses, tools, paper, sugar, whiskey...etc. In our world of 800 numbers, mice, and malls we can't imagine. And Warwick was a town of 1200 at its peak of population, around 1820, probably. Not a center of industry.

I'll look for you mom's book.

Mrleft8
12-15-2004, 08:11 AM
Originally posted by J. Dillon:
Hey Doug,

Where were you at the opening on Sunday? I was there and didn't make the connection. Great book and give her my sincere congratulations. I lookded it over page by page. :D :D

What does it go for ? One gent at the intro's said that presently there were only 3 in CT. :(

Noticed it was printed in Singapore. :confused:

Are any of the remaining buildings in the way of the new Q bridge ? ( Pearl Harbor Memorial bridge it's proper name)

BTW was any of your stuff at the shop show room???? :confused:
JDWhat opening on Sunday? I don't know the sale price, but I'd guess around $35-$40. The 3 actual copies currently in CT. are all "advance copies". It was printed in Singapore because the University press of New England decided that was the best price. My mother wanted it printed here, but the cost vs. quality battle was lost.
The Yale boat house is either being demolished, or (hopefully ) moved. There was a legal battle to get the feds to move the new bridge to save the boat house, but the feds won.
What shop showroom? Where was this opening?

Gary Lee
12-15-2004, 08:33 AM
It was printed in Singapore because the University press of New England decided that was the best price.

This is known as outsourcing in the blue states. ;)

Check this link out. This was saved from a disaster and bulldozing, and has been brought back to life, opening again in 2003.
http://www.monumenthouse.com/richmond/landmarks/3043

uncas
12-15-2004, 08:39 AM
Meleft8
Any idea as to where the boathouse is being moved?

Mrleft8
12-15-2004, 08:56 AM
Originally posted by uncas:
Meleft8
Any idea as to where the boathouse is being moved?Not at present. I think there's a non-profit group trying to raise funds to move it upstream a bit. I'll see if I can find out. It's a gorgeous building.

uncas
12-15-2004, 09:47 AM
Meleft8
I would think the past grads at Yale would chip in.....Heck my father was on crew in '33-37. I have a feeling that if he was still alive, he would have chipped in.

[ 12-15-2004, 10:47 AM: Message edited by: uncas ]

Figment
12-15-2004, 02:05 PM
Before the "Amistad" made its home on that long wharf pier, there was talk of moving the boathouse there. That would've been interesting.

Moving it upstream, I dunno. There are few worthy pieces of frontage. Perhaps upstream of the chapel street bridge.... before the oyster piles. It really is a great building. I'm surprised that Yale itself doesn't buy it back. They can always use another quirky piece of history.

I'm lways on the lookout for a new book, and the preservationist vein of my brain could use a good feeding. This sounds like a winner. :cool:

J. Dillon
12-15-2004, 03:12 PM
Doug,

It was a celebraton about the publication of the book. The event took place at Fairhaven wood works on Blatchley ave. at 3 PM last Sunday. They introduced several editors and those who worked on the book.

The wood wokers show room is also there and the event did bring customers. Maybe that is why it was hosted at this location. :rolleyes:

I don't see how the quality and size of the book could go for the price you quoted.

It is not a coffee table book but one of scholarly
input. The illustrations are also first class. You and your mom should be proud. smile.gif

Might be a place where you could sell some of your work.

JD

Mrleft8
12-16-2004, 07:11 AM
FAIR HAVEN WOODWORKS!!!! :eek: :eek:
No WONDER I didn't hear about it!!!
No Jack, none of the work you saw was mine!
Let's just say that Kerry Triffin and I have a...."History".... The chances of me ever having woork displayed in his show room are pretty slim.

Donn
12-16-2004, 07:16 AM
Originally posted by Mrleft8:
..Let's just say that Kerry Triffin and I have a...."History"...Republican, is he?
:D

J. Dillon
12-16-2004, 08:21 AM
Doug, that "history" might make good reading ? ;)

Maybe when the political issues are getting too nasty. :eek:

JD

Mrleft8
12-17-2004, 07:26 AM
Originally posted by Donn:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Mrleft8:
..Let's just say that Kerry Triffin and I have a...."History"...Republican, is he?
:D </font>[/QUOTE]Hardly! More likely a Green or Socialist. He's a zoned out whacko.

Bruce Hooke
12-17-2004, 12:59 PM
According to Amazon the list price is $35, which is about what I would expect for a 224 page hard cover book. It looks like an interesting book.

I'd guess that the history of New Haven and the history of Providence probably have a lot of similarities. Providence was built on the manufacturing of textiles, machine tools, steam engines, and many other things (as well as, sadly, the slave trade to some degree).

P.S. Amazon's "If you are intersted in this you might be interested in..." system seems to have fallen flat on it's face (or maybe a more private part of the anatomy) on this one: :D


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