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Stuckie
11-30-2005, 02:05 PM
The person who built the house I'm living in painted raw linseed oil on the box board wooden ceiling. It has not dried during the four years I have been living in the house. Can I paint a drier on top of the linseed oil and will it eventually dry? Or is there another suggestion on how to un-stick the ceiling boards. I tried scraping it off with mineral spirits but that did not do much. Help!!!!

Phillip Allen
11-30-2005, 05:05 PM
Mineral spirits won't touch it...gotta use turpentine. I don't know if painting on Japan drier would work...you could do a test spot maybe

Phillip Allen
11-30-2005, 06:59 PM
Another thought comes to mind...spray on Tru-oil (can be purchaced through gun dealers). It is linseed based but drys fast. Most folks carry it in bottles but it can be had in aerosol cans.

Perhaps it can be strayed on over the tacky stuff and the driers present in it will dry the raw stuff...?

[ 11-30-2005, 07:01 PM: Message edited by: Phillip Allen ]

PatCox
11-30-2005, 09:24 PM
Linseed oil is that oil that forms the base of artists oil paints, isn't it? I love the smell of that stuff.

But is it not also the oil that ignites itself if you let a bunch of rags soaked in it accumulate?

Phillip Allen
12-01-2005, 05:43 AM
Originally posted by PatCox:
Linseed oil is that oil that forms the base of artists oil paints, isn't it? I love the smell of that stuff.

But is it not also the oil that ignites itself if you let a bunch of rags soaked in it accumulate?dunno...(bet it is)

TomF
12-01-2005, 08:15 AM
Yup, linseed-soaked rags can spontaneously combust. Something to do with heat generated during polymerization, IIRC.

Stiletto
12-01-2005, 05:21 PM
It sure does ignite, I attended a housefire caused by that when I was a volunteer fireman. The owner had been oiling paneling and left the rags in his laundry. Another risky one I recall is laundry powder and motor oil.

Phillip Allen
12-01-2005, 07:53 PM
Originally posted by Stiletto:
It sure does ignite, I attended a housefire caused by that when I was a volunteer fireman. The owner had been oiling paneling and left the rags in his laundry. Another risky one I recall is laundry powder and motor oil.Hey...I used to be a volunteer fireman! Lotsa old stories like when Bob reached out and caught Wiley's false teeth as he leaned out over the roof to yell for a pike pole...

Katherine
12-01-2005, 08:02 PM
Phil, there's a redneck joke in there somewhere. :D

Wild Wassa
12-02-2005, 09:26 AM
Originally posted by PatCox:
"Linseed oil is that oil that forms the base of artists oil paints, isn't it?"

Linseed is the binder for enamels and traditional varnish. It is also one of the binders in poly/oil blend varnish.

"But is it not also the oil that ignites itself if you let a bunch of rags soaked in it accumulate?"

When I was younger we were working on a deck and the painter had wiped the oil over with turpentine to clean the deck. The rags were left in the sun and they started smoking.

Put rags that have oil and turps on them in water until you can dispose of them.

Warren.