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PeterSibley
10-19-2005, 04:15 AM
I was listening to a program on radio last week,essentially it was about the insurance industry's response to global warming.Their interest was in the increasing frequency of catastrophic weather events.In passing one of the speakers ,an industry representative ,wondered out loud who would be willing to reinsure New Orleans........and without insurance there will be a very slow return of businesses not absolutely requiring to be in New Orleans .Without those businesses ,less work and lower labour requirements....I know the politicians say New Orleans will be rebuilt...but at what scale?

ahp
10-19-2005, 09:16 AM
Perhaps a greater part of NO should not be there. That said, the Port of NO is absolutely essential. And, there have to be people there to run it and all that goes with them.

One of my aquaintances is a harbor pilot here and has worked in NO. He tells me that really the Port of NO extends all the way up to Baton Rouge, a distance of about 100 miles as the crow flies and perhaps 150 by the way the Mississippi winds.

Perhaps the Port will simply move up river. I don't know how far up river a large ship can go however. Any of you know?

Phillip Allen
10-19-2005, 09:20 AM
Huey P. Long build a bridge at, I think, Baton Rouge to keep ships from moving upriver and out of his control...

Osborne Russel
10-19-2005, 10:18 AM
For sure much of the New Orleans area should never have been developed. Much of Southern California. The barrier islands. Etc.

The insurance companies know it is uneconomic. THe only way it happens is by massive government subsidies to developers, procured by conservatives in the name of the common man.

ahp
10-19-2005, 12:32 PM
MY auto insuror, AMICA, of whom I have a good opinion, will not insure a barrier beach property, like where I live.

Bruce Hooke
10-19-2005, 12:47 PM
Federal Flood Insurance also provides a lot of the back-up insurance that makes it possible to build at all in high flood risk areas, and if it was not before, I expect all of New Orleans may now be considered a flood zone, at least until such point as the levees become MUCH more reliable.

It seems like there are a lot of former residents of New Orleans who are not inclined to move back, so it seems like New Orleans may well end up a good bit smaller population-wise than it was before the hurricane, BUT the challange will be how to manage that transition. It obviously does not help the flood situation much, and creates other social problems, if half the house lots on any given block are unused, but the occupied houses are scattered across the entire city. New Orleans is, it seems to me, a truly unprecidented urban planning challange.

Alan D. Hyde
10-19-2005, 01:47 PM
That's not so, Osborne.

Historically, before there was "public housing," back when most people lived in houses or shacks, lower-income individuals found it more affordable to squat or to buy cheap land in flood prone areas.

Hence, if a nearby city or town had attractive jobs, living conditions, or other types of magnetic attractions, then such areas might be substantially built-up by those who could pay for no better.

Alan

Osborne Russel
10-19-2005, 01:51 PM
Originally posted by Alan D. Hyde:
Historically, before there was "public housing," back when most people lived in houses or shacks, lower-income individuals found it more affordable to squat or to buy cheap land in flood prone areas.

Hence, if a nearby city or town had attractive jobs, living conditions, or other types of magnetic attractions, then such areas might be substantially built-up by those who could pay for no better.Historically, flood-prone areas were flooded, fire-prone areas were burnt, etc.

Without insurance it can't be financed and without the government it can't be insured.

George Roberts
10-19-2005, 04:10 PM
According to this week's NewsWeek: Holland has no flood insurance.

That country seems to grow well.

I suspect many people are self insured. I certainly was for long periods of my life.

You can always borrow money. You might need to pay a premium if you want to borrow to build in New Orleans, but you can build there.

PeterSibley
10-19-2005, 04:27 PM
You can always borrow money. You might need to pay a premium if you want to borrow to build in New Orleans, but you can build there.
That would surely be a major disincentive to business George? Here in Australia,insurance companines will not pay out for flood damage,but that only applies to small sectors of various cities...a good way to get green space.

Its seems that NO will be very short of insurable building space.

George Roberts
10-19-2005, 06:54 PM
PeterSibley ---

I expect that areas of New Orleans that are below sea level will be rebuilt with a sea level flood and storm surge in mind.

That might include placing parking structures below sea level and living areas above sea level.

I expect that many people with foresight will finance such projects. I expect they will make lots of money.

John Gearing
10-19-2005, 08:10 PM
Re the Netherlands. I saw a piece on local TV that explained that the Dutch govt actually has a plan in place to deliberately flood large expanses of the countryside along the Rhine just inside the border with Germany. The idea is to have a controlled flood there rather than a wild flood downriver that affects a city. One of the people interviewed was pointing at his own house, saying "if they let the water in, only my chimney will be visible above the water. But, the govt will give us plenty of warning so we can move all our possessions out, and the govt will pay us for any damages our property receives." Yup, the dutch govt is financially backing the whole thing, and is managing the entire operation. Hard to believe, right, that the GOVT might not be totally incompetent?

And in fact, it turns out that the dutch have an even better idea: houses that can FLOAT during floods (but NOT float away) and which remain habitable (ie maintaining water and power). Read about it here: Der Spiegel (http://service.spiegel.de/cache/international/spiegel/0,1518,377050,00.html)

[ 10-19-2005, 09:11 PM: Message edited by: John Gearing ]

seafox
10-19-2005, 10:06 PM
john their is a family I read about of the floodway that starts where the red river used to join the missippie river. they didn't want to give up their land even though it was inside the diked path that carrys excess water from the missippie river so that new orleans is protected. they built their home on a retired grain barge flood comes they float till it passes and then settle back down to the ground. their is a flood control structure at the top of the flood way. with out this structure the mouth of the missippie river would move over to come out by morgan town ( think the river is called the atfalatcha) would "capture" the missippie and the old channel past battonrouge and new orleans would become abackwater slowly being silted in. if the control structure were to fail the river would have a half as long and twice as steep path to the sea.

it is my understanding that salt water can be found at the bottom of the river as far upstream as vicksburg thus the river is deep enough for ship traphic but could it be true the lousiana state goverment would be able to build a bridge thatinterfears with navagation?