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NormMessinger
07-14-2003, 10:41 AM
Is the bottled stuff worth the extra cost, taste wise or health wise?

Donn
07-14-2003, 10:44 AM
It's worth it for us. We drink it, and use it for tea and coffee. The dog won't even drink city water.

brad9798
07-14-2003, 10:47 AM
I had a nice water softener system/purifier installed in the house about six years ago.

I LOVE IT.

Water is awesome, and so soft.

No more hard water!

Now, that being said, no way would I pay for bottled water ... half that stuff, when tested, seems to be little more than tap water!

Brad

Greg H
07-14-2003, 10:49 AM
'pends where you live, our city water is iky. A good filter will make it palitable,or at least good enough for coffee, as long as you make it strong enough.

oldriverat
07-14-2003, 10:50 AM
Well, We Have Artisian Well Water In Memphis . I have no idea why someone would buy bottled water. :D

Ian McColgin
07-14-2003, 10:52 AM
Depends on your town.

I've found Hyannis and Edgartown (filled up at both places) just fine when fresh and I drink either when at a friend's place. The tank water will go interesting after a bit, which is why I toss about a gallon of gin in each tank (2/3 of 1%) and keep some bottled water in the box for drinking.

But I often, especially if I can borrow freezer space, just freeze bottles of Hyannis town water and use them for both cooling and drinking.

There are other towns on Cape - this is a sole sourse aquifer so the difference is in the plant - where the water is not so tasty.

There are persistant rumors that some of the spring water plants have resorted to town water, but they remain unsubstantiated.

Preserve our bodily fluids.

ishmael
07-14-2003, 10:53 AM
Well, away from it all with drilled well, I read with interest that much of the water on the shelf, at the super, was up to two years old. tongue.gif

When I was in Bangor I reveled in that water. It wasn't clorinated, but rather purified by ozone (gotta love liberals, a smile for Stan).

If the water out the tap is ugly I'd look into a service that brings big bottles.

martin schulz
07-14-2003, 10:56 AM
Originally posted by Memphis Mike:
I have no idea why someone would buy bottled water. :D Neither can I, but then we have the same water coming out of our faucets the Flensburg Brewery is using to make beer. :D

Actually it is a shame that we are all using drinkable water to flush our toilets with. :(

Wayne Jeffers
07-14-2003, 11:00 AM
Health? No.

Taste? Depends on what you're used to.

We have spring water at home, and to me most city water isn't fit to drink because of the bad taste compared to what I'm accustomed to. But water in those little plastic bottles at $1 or more for a half-liter is a rip-off. You can buy distilled water in gallons for a half dollar.

If I had city water, I'd probably get one of those charcoal filters that mount under the sink to filter drinking water. They seem to work well.

Wayne

km gresham
07-14-2003, 11:07 AM
I always think there is some guy in the back of the store filling those expensive bottles with tap water. ;) Maybe I've seen one too many of those 60 minutes thingys.

Our city water tastes fine, but always smells like bug spray to me. :eek:

[ 07-14-2003, 12:08 PM: Message edited by: km gresham ]

JimD
07-14-2003, 11:12 AM
I thought everything was pure in Omaha :D

Meerkat
07-14-2003, 11:16 AM
I'd get a Britta Water Pitcher or one of those Pur screw-on-the-tap filters before I'd spend too much money on bottled water, whether it came from a grocery store or a delivery service. Most "distilled water" came out of a garden hose (or maybe some moderately better source, but unprocessed), "real" "distilled" water is reverse osmosis filtered and real distilled water is rare and expensive due to the energy costs to make it.

Donn
07-14-2003, 11:57 AM
I buy bottled water ($2.29/3 gallon box) because it tastes better than our city water. The city water is chlorinated, and has calcium hydroxide added to control ph. Not all bottled water tastes better. I didn't like the taste of Poland Springs, so now I buy America's Choice. When you drink 1.5-2 gallons a day, taste is important.

NormMessinger
07-14-2003, 12:00 PM
Well, the reason I asked was only partly troll. Bottled water was on my mind since it seemed to go from the cooler faster than soda pop on our Fourth of July neighborhood Law Flaunt. Then an article (http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?colID=13&articleID=000007F0-6) in Scientific American this month had this:

The most telling taste test was conducted by the Showtime television
series Penn & Teller: Bull****! The hosts began with a blind comparison
in which 75 percent of New Yorkers preferred city tap to bottled waters.
They then went to the Left Coast and set up a hidden camera at a trendy
southern California restaurant that featured a water sommelier who
dispensed elegant water menus to the patrons. All bottles were filled
out of the same hose in the back of the restaurant; nevertheless,
Angelenos were willing to plunk down nearly $7 a bottle for L'eau Du
Robinet (French for "faucet water"), Agua de Culo (Spanish for "ass
water") and Amazone ("filtered through the Brazilian rain forest's
natural filtration system"), declaring them all to be far superior to
tap water. There's no accounting for taste.

We've lived in some places where the water tasted like, well, not so good, but that was before the bottled water craze so we held our nose and drank it. Why folks would come from all around to take jugs of sulphur water home from the springs near Sulphur, Oklahoma, while others would wallow in the black sulphur mud below Black Sulphur Spring.

Can't be sure about the purity of everything in Omaha but I guess the water is okay. There are towns and pure water farm wells that have nasties that babies at least should not drink.

It comes down to where one lives, as seems to be the consensus, eh?

Bottoms up!

[ 07-14-2003, 01:14 PM: Message edited by: NormMessinger ]

Ken Hall
07-14-2003, 12:02 PM
Brita pitcher...tastes better than tap, and makes better coffee, tea (hot or iced), and lemonade (a summer staple around here).

Reds
07-14-2003, 12:06 PM
Have you read Coca Cola's Aquifina bottle?

Source = PWS

PWS = Public Water Supply

ishmael
07-14-2003, 12:14 PM
humans seem to be the only thing on the planet that actually crap in their water. i got clean air too... You are unfamiliar with whale, perchance? cetaceans in general?

There's nothing wrong with humans that a condom or two wouldn't fix. Too damn many, all wanting a three thousand foot house, with heat in the winter and 68 degrees in the summer. We're sick1

LeeG
07-14-2003, 12:58 PM
Originally posted by Reds:
Have you read Coca Cola's Aquifina bottle?

Source = PWS

PWS = Public Water SupplyThere's a hysterical sequence of letters in July Harpers from a concerned user of the English language to Coca-Cola about the marketing phrase "Treat yourself well. Everyday". The phase is a part of Dasani mineral water ad.

Alan D. Hyde
07-14-2003, 01:07 PM
They absorb considerable quantities through their membranes, popeye. The skin is not a watertight barrier; it's more like a fine screen.

Why do you suppose it is that swimmers, after a while in the water, not drinking anything, have a strong urge to urinate?

We absorb it too, when we're in the water.

Alan

[ 07-14-2003, 02:08 PM: Message edited by: Alan D. Hyde ]

Meerkat
07-14-2003, 01:21 PM
Y'all recall, no doubt, W. C. Fields' retort to a waiter who asked him if he wanted water: "Never touch the stuff, fish f**k in it!" :D

Mike DeHart
07-14-2003, 01:28 PM
A good friend had this as an ongoing argument where he works. Finally, they had samples of the bottled and tap water sent to be analyzed. The bottled water turned up significantly more nasty small life. No wonder, it is neither chlorinated or monitored. Water is where stuff grows.

I recently heard that there is a growing rate of kids with cavities in their teeth. It has been linked to the fact that bottled water is not fluorinated.

Finally, bottled water costs about $1.25 per pint. This times 8 pints per gallon gives a bulk price of $10 PER GALLON for WATER! This is happily paid by the same silly ‘Mericans who DEMAND that the government do something about the price of gasoline when it hits $1.50 per gallon, as they scream about corporate profiteering and the evils of price gouging. :confused:

I just don’t get it.

km gresham
07-14-2003, 01:35 PM
Glad you mentioned about the cavities in kids teeth, Mike. Bunch of yuppie parents(us poorer parents couldn't afford it!) were giving their tykes "pure" bottled water and ended up with dental bills for fillings.
Our kids had nasty ol' city water, but no cavities ;)

Wayne Jeffers
07-14-2003, 01:40 PM
Careful, Karen.

Don't you know that fluoridated city water is creeping socialism? :eek:

Wayne

Matt J.
07-14-2003, 01:44 PM
I can't stand "city" water, with its chlorine and chemicals... I like our well water. ASide from that, I don't really care between well and bottle.

Somehow I feel compelled to post that water is the single most precious resource we are destroying currently and is, price per unit of weight, the cheapest resource made available to the public for consumption. Water should be expensive and remain available, gas should be cheap. That way the water will last, the gas will go. Ask the people in the islands (Hawaii comes to mind) and similar places - Florida - where fresh water supplies are dwindling and becoming problematic.

Meerkat
07-14-2003, 01:50 PM
I don't recall if it's Buffet or Pickens who have bought up many millions of acre-feet of water rights. Water is said to be the issue of the 21st century. I suspect people will war far more agressively over water than they ever did over oil.

The explosive growth of three private water utility companies in the last 10 years raises fears that mankind may be losing control of its most vital resource to a handful of monopolistic corporations. In Europe and North America, analysts predict that within the next 15 years these companies will control 65 percent to 75 percent of what are now public waterworks. The companies have worked closely with the World Bank and other international financial institutions to gain a foothold on every continent. They aggressively lobby for legislation and trade laws to force cities to privatize their water and set the agenda for debate on solutions to the world’s increasing water scarcity. The companies argue they are more efficient and cheaper than public utilities. Critics say they are predatory capitalists that ultimately plan to control the world’s water resources and drive up prices even as the gap between rich and poor widens. The fear is that accountability will vanish, and the world will lose control of its source of life.
The Center For Public Integrity (http://www.icij.org/dtaweb/index.asp?L1=30&L2=0&L3=0&L4=0&L5=0)

[ 07-14-2003, 02:54 PM: Message edited by: Meerkat ]

Norm Harris
07-14-2003, 04:16 PM
To add to what Mike DeHart said:

Paying $10.00/gal for bottled water is in the same league as paying the dummy tax (buying lottery tickets). Those of us who live in cities already pay for water treatment that is supposed to render the water we use harmless. In most cities, the water is not only harmless it is healthful. In those places where problems in water quality crop up, quality not taste, you citizens ought to hold your local water works operators responsible. Who in their right mind pays to maintain municipal water operations and then pays again to buy water at $10.00/gal maximum or even $0.50/gal from a vending machine that you know nothing about. Raise hell with your public administrators, YOU ALREADY PAID FOR THE PRIVILEDGE!

On the other hand, if the taste is what bothers you because of the local geology, buy a faucet filter. We own a counter top Pur model that costs us about $8.00 for a filter that lasts six months in two-person household.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
07-14-2003, 06:10 PM
Bit of both, for us. Woodbridge water tastes vile after a spell in the boat's tanks, and reeks of hydrogen sulphide, suggesting some anaerobic bacterial activity. So we use bottled water for cold drinks, but tap water for drinks that involve boiling it first.

Nicholas Carey
07-14-2003, 08:08 PM
Originally posted by NormMessinger:
Well, the reason I asked was only partly troll. Bottled water was on my mind since it seemed to go from the cooler faster than soda pop on our Fourth of July neighborhood Law Flaunt. Then an article (http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?colID=13&articleID=000007F0-6) in Scientific American this month had this:

[i]The most telling taste test was conducted by the Showtime television
series Penn & Teller: Bull****! The hosts began with a blind comparison
in which 75 percent of New Yorkers preferred city tap to bottled waters.That's 'cause NYC municipal water supply is some of the cleanest around. It comes from rainwater in the mountains upstate.

Seattle's the same way. Seattle's water supply (http://www.ci.seattle.wa.us/util/services/Drinkingwater/systemhistory.htm) comes from the city-owned Cedar River Watershed (http://www.cedarriver.org/)— nearly 100,000 acres of closed wilderness providing high-quality meltwater from the Cascades snowpack.

http://www.cityofseattle.net/util/cedarwatershed/images/watershedarial.jpg

I used to know a woman who was an engineer for the Seattle Public Utilities, who told me that there's still one [shortish] stretch of pipe coming down from the watershed that consists of big (60in. diameter) hollowed-out western red cedar logs. The engineer's rationale is that they've been working well for more than a century...so why bother to replace them?

Seattle also gets most of its electricity from the municipal watersheds, giving us (since it's all municipally owned) the lowest electric rates in the country.

Ahh...the joys of—shades of Creeping Socialism, Batman!—municipally owned public utilities.

thechemist
07-14-2003, 08:24 PM
Originally posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett:
Bit of both, for us. Woodbridge water tastes vile after a spell in the boat's tanks, and reeks of hydrogen sulphide, suggesting some anaerobic bacterial activity. So we use bottled water for cold drinks, but tap water for drinks that involve boiling it first.Add two parts per million of Iodine [or 100 parts per million of a 2% tincture of Iodine] to handle the bacteria, and a bit of lime juice to bring the taste closer to acceptable.

Larry P.
07-14-2003, 08:28 PM
Somehow I feel compelled to post that water is the single most precious resource we are destroying currently and is, price per unit of weight, the cheapest resource made available to the public for consumption. Water should be expensive Actually, every drop of water that has ever fell on the earth is still here. It is our wastewater treatment that is screwed up. We treat wastewater then along the coast at least we pump the treated water into the ocean rather than into the ground to be purified and reused.

Bob Adams
07-14-2003, 08:41 PM
The Baltimore City water system provides excellent tasting water that has won many awards.(yes they have judging for that!) That aside, my employer provides bottled drinking water.Reading the source on the bottles...filtered municipal water. Same as hanging a filter on the faucet, except it costs a whole lot more!

Mrleft8
07-14-2003, 08:59 PM
GOOD GOD! DRINK WATER!? Why drink water when there's so much beer to be had?! :D

imported_Conrad
07-14-2003, 10:48 PM
Bobby pushed his sister Nell,
In the family drinking well,
She's there still,
Because it kilt'er'
now we have to buy a filter! :D

I don't know why I remembered that from 2nd grade....... :rolleyes:

[ 07-15-2003, 01:35 AM: Message edited by: Conrad S. ]

htom
07-15-2003, 12:01 AM
We buy bottle-it-yourself water at the local grocery store for about thirty cents a gallon to use in the coffee maker; I figure that this is cheaper than running a gallon of vinegar a week through it to keep it from clogging up. She claims that she can tell the difference in taste between the stuff from the grocery and from the PUR filter[shrug]. Other than that, tap water (softened; Eagan provides water at < 21 grains of hardness, but not very much less, maybe 20.9.)

Todd Bradshaw
07-15-2003, 12:02 AM
I'm in the middle of tearing out our bathroom and replacing just about everything. What really stunned me was what the inside of the water feed pipes for the sink look like after 85 years! There is furry stuff growing in there that you just don't want to know about, along with at least two colors of some sort of sludge. Makes you wonder if you really want to brush your teeth with water that comes out of the nice clean faucet twelve inches later...

Andrew Craig-Bennett
07-15-2003, 02:15 AM
Originally posted by thechemist:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett:
Bit of both, for us. Woodbridge water tastes vile after a spell in the boat's tanks, and reeks of hydrogen sulphide, suggesting some anaerobic bacterial activity. So we use bottled water for cold drinks, but tap water for drinks that involve boiling it first.Add two parts per million of Iodine [or 100 parts per million of a 2% tincture of Iodine] to handle the bacteria, and a bit of lime juice to bring the taste closer to acceptable.</font>[/QUOTE]Thanks very much indeed, Chemist! I will hie me down to the chemist's shop and do just that!

Ron Williamson
07-15-2003, 05:31 AM
Around here,bottled water use(not sales,as municipalities give it away when they screw up their water treatment) went way up after the Walkerton thing( :mad: ) in May 2001.For whatever reason,people trust a bottler(with no standards or requirements)over a town with highly maintained standards(these days anyway :rolleyes: ) and well qualified(and well paid)employees.
There was a guy right down on the water in Tobermory(essentially in the middle of Lake Huron),who was bottling raw lake water.There was NOTHING wrong with the stuff,but no one would buy it.These same people prefered "spring water" from his faucet,which also came from Lake Huron,via some underwater fissures.
R

[ 07-15-2003, 06:32 AM: Message edited by: Ron Williamson ]

cs
07-15-2003, 06:26 AM
Our city water is not to awful bad. I drink city water and bottled water. I will buy bottles of water to take places and I will buy a gallon of water for making tea. After the first batch I will make a couple of more in the jug with city water and than start on a new jug.

I have been in places where the public water was terriable. One of these places was North Dakota. You could run a glass of tap water and than light it on fire (the fumes that is). And I'm not joking about this.

Chad

ishmael
07-15-2003, 06:31 AM
Oh com'on ya must be joking a little. smile.gif

km gresham
07-15-2003, 07:01 AM
The convenience of bottled water for taking along in coolers was a stroke of genius. I don't like carbonated drinks, and I don't like beer, and it's way better for everybody and the kids can drink it and it's very refreshing on a hot day smile.gif

Of course, I save the bottles and fill em back up with city water to save $ :D

Scott Rosen
07-15-2003, 08:50 AM
Chemist,

Thanks for the tip. But could you translate that into kitchen physics, please? How many drops/ounces of tincture of iodine per 10 gallons of water?

Can one use povidone iodine, i.e., Betadine?

Popeye
07-15-2003, 11:24 AM
1 ppm is 1 ml in 1000 litres. in imperial measure that's one smidgen in a whole heap.

however, be aware that metals like iodine in solution contain solvents. mix said metals and solvents with more metals (calcium) and solvents (water) and now you are drinking dead bacteria (given sufficient time of contact with I) mixed with sulphides and and and well, now ya got soup that's bad for your thyroid gland..

can we reset here?

"Success is relative. It is what we can make of the mess we have made of things".

--T. S. Eliot

Wayne Jeffers
07-15-2003, 12:11 PM
Scott,

You can check at camping supply stores for iodine sold in crystal form for water purification. Unlike tincture, the crystals have unlimited shelf life.

Note that anyone allergic to seafood is probably allergic to iodine. (The iodine in fresh seafood is what most people have an allergic reaction to.) Pregnant women should avoid water purified with iodine.

For use aboard a boat, I think using a filter that is effective against microorganisms (and filtering only the water you're going to drink or use for cooking) makes more sense. Maybe carry iodine crystals for backup water purification.

Wayne

Meerkat
07-15-2003, 01:58 PM
What about clorox as a biocide for water? Something like 1 tsp/10 gallons?

Popeye
07-16-2003, 07:37 AM
diluted chlorine bleach (and let it stand 24 hours), to my mind, is (albiet not perfect) a much safer way to do this, supposing you are stuck with stinky water. chlorine will eventually break down, oxidize bacteria and gas off; and any residual will not accumulate in your body as would nasty metals.

this is not black and white though, some bact are good for you, some are not, some will die and become icky trihalomethane, ewwww,, others will colonize and live in different neighbourhoods. what your colon can tolerate and expul is the key (my dog could eat **** and be happy). so if there's a little skull and cross bones man on the label, this is a bad thing.

consider also a charcoal filter with ion exchange resin (like brita) to clean up metals and chlorine debris.

"Missus-a Wiggins, hold-a alla my calls, yew got-a dat"?

--tudball

Rogue Sailor
07-16-2003, 09:59 AM
Evian

is Naive spelled backwards

:D :D :D :D

goodbasil
03-01-2016, 05:24 PM
I live in a place called Abbotsford, B.C., in the Clearbrook section. Clearbrook Water District was awarded a gold metal at an annual U.S. sampling known as the academy awards of water.
This is the third gold win.
So, if your passing through, be sure to stop for a cold one.
It's good water, I have it everyday right from the tap.

Tom Montgomery
03-01-2016, 05:40 PM
The Louisville Water Company (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisville_Water_Company) delivers a fine product.

The old Louisville Water Tower (1856) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisville_Water_Tower) is the oldest ornamental water tower in the world and is on the National Register of Historic Places along with the pumping station:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d1/Louisville_water_tower.jpg/250px-Louisville_water_tower.jpg

https://thebldgblock.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/detail-of-statues-on-water-tower.jpg

Willin'
03-01-2016, 06:06 PM
The US could stand more towers and other public infrastructure that were designed with eye appeal like that! Very cool!

goodbasil
03-01-2016, 06:12 PM
We don't have water towers here as a rule. Seen a few in Ontario & the states.
Mine comes up from 3 wells.

Harry Miller
03-01-2016, 06:44 PM
What a nostalgia of names!
BTW our water here is excellent.

Dan McCosh
03-01-2016, 06:50 PM
They bottle Detroit water and sell it for $4 a gallon.

cathouse willy
03-01-2016, 08:32 PM
The water in the vancouver area comes from mountain lake resevoirs. It's said to be among the best water anywhere and I agree.I drink it straight, right from the tap. No need for water filters or softeners.What does not make sense is that we use this same excellent water to wash our cars,water our lawns and flush the john.

pipefitter
03-01-2016, 10:08 PM
Bottled water seems to not quench my thirst. Also, I hate, hate, hate plastic bottles. Spent all that time weaning the young ones from a bottle, only to see them, and a bunch of other adults still pulling on one, nearly constantly.

Most refrigerators these days come with a filtered water dispenser option. Those make pretty good water. And that's about all I drink is, water and a couple cups of coffee/day. Cannot remember the last soda pop I drank. I think it was a Vernors ginger ale about two years ago.