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jwaldin
11-21-2004, 03:10 PM
http://www.bitoffun.com/images/wei-Bombsquad.jpg

uncas
11-21-2004, 05:16 PM
I hope they are being paid well to do this....
What's in the bag?

JimD
11-21-2004, 05:36 PM
I like the way the bomb is cordoned off with the red and white tape. I guess that means you're safe as long as you're at least 14 feet away.

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
11-21-2004, 09:51 PM
Somebody's gonna need an underwear change. :D tongue.gif

Bet it's hot in that suit. :eek:

Bruce G
11-21-2004, 10:04 PM
Originally posted by Mr. Know It All:
Somebody's gonna need an underwear change. :D tongue.gif

Bet it's hot in that suit. :eek: At least no one else will have to smell his 'oops'!!!! :eek:

cs
11-22-2004, 08:06 AM
You know that ain't even funny. :D

I had a buddy that got kicked of EOD school for using a hammer to lossen the nose piece on a practise round.

Chad

Joe Dupere
11-22-2004, 08:23 AM
My dad retired from the Special Forces at Ft. Bragg, NC. I grew up in a development right next to the base. As kids, we used to wander around the woods on the base or bike out to the drop zones and maneuver areas to see what kind of left over stuff we could find. One day a couple of kids down the street came home with a 105mm recoilless rifle round (IIRC) they'd found somewhere. When their dad got home, he found them dropping it nose first on the concrete driveway trying to see if they could get it to go off.
He cleared the neighborhood and the ordnance folks came in and took care of it.

That was almost 40 years ago. I can't remember a lot of the details since I was only nine or ten, but I do remember that it was quite a bit of excitement there for a couple of hours.

Kids do the darndest things! smile.gif

Joe

Andrew Craig-Bennett
11-22-2004, 10:51 AM
That sort of thing takes me back to childhood; unexploded WW2 bombs were often found by children in post-War Britain and were wonderfully tempting playthings....every now and again the national gene pool would be improved by the elimination of two or three snotty nosed brats or teenagers playing a form of "chicken"...

Only found now in the nets of trawlers working the Thames estuary.

Phillip Allen
11-22-2004, 10:57 AM
I often wonder that dangerous momentos of war must be found all ove Europe and Africa and other such battle grounds.

Ian McColgin
11-22-2004, 10:59 AM
Not entirely related but my brother managed to suppress evidence and thus keep his client out of jail on the basis of a warrentless illegal search. The police figured they had cause since they found the child of the searched aparatment sitting outside playing with a live 50 cal round. My brother convinced the judge that in that part of Queens a kid might well pick up such a round on the street . . . .

jwaldin
11-22-2004, 10:59 AM
I used to live on a ketch in a fishing village named Golfe Juan about three miles east of Cannes. As you walked onto the wharf and looked into the water you could see thousands of unexploded 12" artillery shells.
Hey CS if your friend was that dumb it was lucky for everyone he was booted.

[ 11-22-2004, 11:00 AM: Message edited by: jwaldin ]

martin schulz
11-22-2004, 11:03 AM
Originally posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett:
Only found now in the nets of trawlers working the Thames estuary.It's either that our bombs were more efficient or that you guys (including the US) just dropped higher quantities on us.
WWII bombs are still quite frequently found in Germany. The last was a big one in the Hamburg harbour, leading to evacuation of m ore than 10.000 people.

[ 11-22-2004, 11:03 AM: Message edited by: martin schulz ]

JimD
11-22-2004, 11:06 AM
Originally posted by cs:
You know that ain't even funny. :D

I had a buddy that got kicked of EOD school for using a hammer to lossen the nose piece on a practise round.

ChadWasn't that the same buddy who flunked his driver's test by cruising down the freeway on the wrong side of the road and steering with his knees?

cs
11-22-2004, 11:09 AM
Well I never claimed that Rick was the brightest, but he is a good friend.

Chad

edited to add:

His e-mail is dangerous123 if that is any indication of his temperement. :D

[ 11-22-2004, 11:10 AM: Message edited by: cs ]

Phillip Allen
11-22-2004, 11:21 AM
Anybody notice the "joker's" hands seem to belong to a female?

jwaldin
11-22-2004, 11:38 AM
Yeah I noticed that when I found the pic.
On a slightly differnt subject I have a question maybe someone here can answer with some authority.
During the Falklands war a relative was on loan to a Canadian Sub. He said he heard that some of the bombs dropped by the Argentin air force bounched off the decks of the British ships without exploding. He said the reason was the bombs had these wind vanes on them that had to rotate a certain number of times to arm them. The planes that dropped the bombs were flying too low for the vanes to rotate enough times. He said a lot of bombs landed on the British ships and if they all had exploded the British fleet would have been sunk in that bay. Does the wind vane theory sound true?

Andrew Craig-Bennett
11-22-2004, 11:48 AM
Originally posted by martin schulz:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett:
Only found now in the nets of trawlers working the Thames estuary.It's either that our bombs were more efficient or that you guys (including the US) just dropped higher quantities on us.
WWII bombs are still quite frequently found in Germany. The last was a big one in the Hamburg harbour, leading to evacuation of m ore than 10.000 people.</font>[/QUOTE]We dropped lots more...

Funny thing, Hong Kong was not bombed by Japan in WW2 apart from a small raid on the airfield which finished off the RAF's token force of Gloster Gladiator biplanes on the ground.

But the USAF bombed HK with enthusiasm! During the dredging for the new airport Hong Kong United Dockyards handled a dredger a week with a US 500lb bomb stuck in a bucket...this went on for three years!

Andrew Craig-Bennett
11-22-2004, 11:51 AM
jwaldin - that story you heard is partly true. There were cases of Argentine bombs failing to explode because they were dropped at a lower altitude than they were fused for. In many cases they penetrated ships hulls but were defused. However, some exploded whilst people were trying to make them safe.

Keith Wilson
11-22-2004, 11:52 AM
I often wonder that dangerous momentos of war must be found all over Europe and Africa and other such battlegrounds. Sure are. I have read that several people are still killed in France and Belgium every year by left-over munitions from the FIRST World War. They still have to dispose of many many tons of stuff every year. Adds a new dimension to spring plowing, eh?

John of Phoenix
11-22-2004, 12:00 PM
Fun's fun but somebody needs a serious ass whipping here. That shovel would make a handy club.

jwaldin, the prop on the bomb's fuse is a common arming method but it seems to me that that kind of "failed to arm malfunction" would be dropped by a plane in such a close proximity to the target that it would be easily taken out by radar guided anti-aircraft fire. A corroded propeller shaft on old ordinance might be more likely. Simply forgetting to pull the safety pin before takeoff is another possibility. Proximity to the target? Seems unlikely, but I wasn't there.

John E Hardiman
11-22-2004, 06:14 PM
Originally posted by jwaldin:
The planes that dropped the bombs were flying too low for the vanes to rotate enough times. He said a lot of bombs landed on the British ships and if they all had exploded the British fleet would have been sunk in that bay. Does the wind vane theory sound true?The reason that the Argentine bombs did not detnotate was that they were using base fuses (not nose fuses) that needed to go beyond 45 degrees from horizontal before they would arm. A common safey feature for aircraft ingressing at low altitude. In HMS Antelope it seems that they had a problem removing the base fuse before attempting to move the bomb and managed to set it off.

http://www.informationwar.org/wars%20gallery/falkland01.jpg

PS edit.

In the late 60's I was on Guam and in the schools every year they gave a UXO briefing as to what to look for. Many area's were still off-limits then and I've personally seen cases of grenades and and shells rusting away in boonie caves and dumps. Even then it was still sad as the island lost 2-3 people every year to UXO.

[ 11-22-2004, 06:19 PM: Message edited by: John E Hardiman ]