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View Full Version : product recommendation, camping quilt



LeeG
04-19-2019, 04:33 PM
I bought one of these awhile back and have used it for camping, bed comforter but most worthwhile a stargazing serape.
Itís got a velcro closed slot in the middle so you can wear it. Iíve sat out a few winter nights in the 20ís with it on sitting in a cozy chair sipping a hot beverage and itís great. Temps here have swung from 80 to 45 F and itís cozy.

https://www.jacksrbetter.com/product/sierra-sniveller/

switters
04-19-2019, 05:20 PM
Lee, I was thinking of a camping quilt for an upcoming river trip but I cant find one for two people. looks like the overnight lows will be about 50 so no big deal, but they look pretty comfortable and they pack down really well.

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
04-19-2019, 05:32 PM
Read The Pacific Crest Trail Hiker's Handbook by Ray Jardine. He helped start ultralight backpacking, especially for long thru-hikes. The camping quilt was popularized by him and predecessors who were too poor to buy a sleeping bag. The quilt is cheap and easy to fabricate and vents well. Cheap and easy is important as it's pretty much done at the end of a 2000 mile hike. Ray hiked the PCT with a backpack that, minus food and water, weighed 9 lbs, allowing him to hike in light shoes and go faster and further between stops, allowing him to carry less food, less weight, be faster, carry less food..... (Positive circle.) He was a rocket payload engineer. The biggies to watch with weight: The shelter; He used a tarp. The sleep system, he used a quilt, no pad. The backpack; he fabricated a simple one, no small pockets, no hip pad, no zippers, no stays, no padding. I don't go that light, but the book influenced greatly the purchase of my first good pack, I decided against the feature laden, supportive, and Marine tough 7+ lb'er for one that weighed 3 lbs, one big compartment with pocket in the lid, medium weight fabric, a good padded hip belt, and no torso length adjustment as it was available in three fixed lengths.

LeeG
04-19-2019, 05:51 PM
Bob, never met Ray but he has done a LOT of ultra light stuff worth following, cycling and kayaking iirc.

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
04-19-2019, 05:55 PM
Bob, never met Ray but he has done a LOT of ultra light stuff worth following, cycling and kayaking iirc.

Oh yeah he moves on to something new every few years. First climbing, invented spring-loaded cams which financed his other ventures for the rest of his life, then hiking, sailing, I think that's where that (mid '90s) edition of the book ended, but unsurprising that he's on to other things.

LeeG
04-19-2019, 05:56 PM
Lee, I was thinking of a camping quilt for an upcoming river trip but I cant find one for two people. looks like the overnight lows will be about 50 so no big deal, but they look pretty comfortable and they pack down really well.

yeah, thin tights and shirt can make a comfy outfit under a quilt. It was the stargazing serape function that really made sense. One of those camp chairs and the quilt would be perfect. I was thinking for my son in law one of these with a wool blanket serape would make a good cold weather outfit for hunting sitting in a tree stand.

Paul Pless
04-19-2019, 06:07 PM
sounds absolutely miserable. . .


Read The Pacific Crest Trail Hiker's Handbook by Ray Jardine. He helped start ultralight backpacking, especially for long thru-hikes. The camping quilt was popularized by him and predecessors who were too poor to buy a sleeping bag. The quilt is cheap and easy to fabricate and vents well. Cheap and easy is important as it's pretty much done at the end of a 2000 mile hike. Ray hiked the PCT with a backpack that, minus food and water, weighed 9 lbs, allowing him to hike in light shoes and go faster and further between stops, allowing him to carry less food, less weight, be faster, carry less food..... (Positive circle.) He was a rocket payload engineer. The biggies to watch with weight: The shelter; He used a tarp. The sleep system, he used a quilt, no pad. The backpack; he fabricated a simple one, no small pockets, no hip pad, no zippers, no stays, no padding. I don't go that light, but the book influenced greatly the purchase of my first good pack, I decided against the feature laden, supportive, and Marine tough 7+ lb'er for one that weighed 3 lbs, one big compartment with pocket in the lid, medium weight fabric, a good padded hip belt, and no torso length adjustment as it was available in three fixed lengths.

LeeG
04-19-2019, 08:04 PM
sounds absolutely miserable. . .

why? I’m way past that physical resilience and toughness but there’s a wonderful sense of freedom to fly over terrain fast and light.

Paul Pless
04-19-2019, 08:15 PM
rather take a canoe or kayak, so that in the evening i can have a comfortably padded sleeping arrangement, and maybe some whisky or heaven forbid a cold beer. . .