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Paul Pless
04-11-2019, 08:14 AM
Inspired by the Maine versus Canadian lobster thread

What are the common varieties of local seafood, both recreationally and commercially available to you? What do you tend to purchase at the fishmonger or order at restaurants and what do you prefer to fish for yourself?

TomF
04-11-2019, 08:20 AM
Does Dulse count?

Norman Bernstein
04-11-2019, 08:25 AM
Quite honestly, and since I shop in a supermarket, I have no clue as to what fish is 'local' (caught in New England waters), versus that which is caught elsewhere, either domestically, or internationally. Occasionally, some of the fish is labelled; we eat a lot of salmon, and it is labelled either 'Atlantic', or 'From Norway'. We don't eat lobster very often; sometimes, it is labelled 'Product of Canada', sometimes not. For other species, I have no idea.

We really like salmon... and feel good about eating Norwegian farm-raised salmon. I watched a documentary about how it's done in Norway, and was impressed by the level of ecological consciousness that is applied. I'm aware of the ecological hazards; the Norwegian methods don't completely eliminate the risks, but they do seem to be a lot more conservative than what I know about American farm-raised operations.

As for preparing it: I brush the fillets with olive oil, apply salt and pepper, and convection roast at 400F for 22 minutes. We like to eat it with Kikkoman Wasabi sauce.

TomF
04-11-2019, 08:27 AM
Scallops from Fundy are awesome. Good oysters from 'round here too, as well as lobsters. Yeah, I know I know, they're "filters" and all. A guy's got to die from something.

AlanMc
04-11-2019, 08:31 AM
my absolute favorite fish is cobia. throw some tony's on there and blacken it in an iron skillet. eats like a steak more than a fish.

amish rob
04-11-2019, 08:34 AM
The striped, spotted and large mouth basses. Occasionally a smallie.

Peace,
I Don't Kiss Them

TomF
04-11-2019, 08:38 AM
The brook trout 'round here are numerous and delicious, but almost too cute to eat.

AlanMc
04-11-2019, 08:38 AM
The striped, spotted and large mouth basses. Occasionally a smallie.

Peace,
I Don't Kiss Them


oh man, we fish for stripes on the river. those fried beauties are so good.


and if we're including freshwater. crappie crappie crappie....

Canoeyawl
04-11-2019, 08:39 AM
It is pretty good eats here...
Wild local seafood;
Black Cod (Sablefish)
Albacore
King Salmon
Dungeness Crab
Squid
Sole
California Halibut
Prawns
Sea Bass
Sardines
Sand Dabs
Rockfish
Coho Salmon (edit)
Herring
Ling Cod
Anchovies
Octopus


Farmed local seafood;
Anchovies
Mussels
Oysters
Clams

edit;
Most of the common fresh water species are available here also

Keith Wilson
04-11-2019, 08:39 AM
Sander vitreus. Drill a hole in the ice, drop a line, and hope you catch one before you freeze solid. Tasty.

http://www.magfish.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/New-Walleye-Presentation-Perspectives-Feature-In-Fisherman.jpg

Peerie Maa
04-11-2019, 08:41 AM
How far is local?

Really local: Mackerel, brown crab, brown shrimp, flukes, cockles and oysters.

From the supermarket we buy whole herring, kippers, sprats, ray wing, Arbroath Smokeys, brown crab, mussels, cod, smoked haddock, smoked mackerel, smoked salmon, prawns. Apart from the cod and prawns all of those can be caught in British waters.

amish rob
04-11-2019, 08:49 AM
oh man, we fish for stripes on the river. those fried beauties are so good.


and if we're including freshwater. crappie crappie crappie....
We have lake bound fish and roamers up on the Delta. Tacos, anyone?

Peace,
All About The Bass

mmd
04-11-2019, 08:50 AM
Oh, my. A thread about fish on a forum about boats. Talk about waving a red flag at a bull.

As can be expected from my previous posts about where I live, fish is a big deal around here. Compared to our friends and neighbours in the area, we don't eat that much fish - probably no more than two or three times a week. We do tend to be a bit fussy over freshness, since most of the seafood we eat is less than 24 hours out of the water. That said, around here we have these local seafoods:

lobster
snow crab
shrimp
scallops
mussels
clams
razor clams
oysters
periwinkles
haddock (probably our favourite)
halibut
cod
hake
salmon
shark
tuna
mackerel
herring
trout
perch

Since I can get most of these at the local grocery or directly from the fishing boat, I don't go fishing myself.

Jimmy W
04-11-2019, 08:51 AM
About 60% of U.S. farm-raised catfish are grown within a 65-mile (100-km) radius of Belzoni, Mississippi. I am about 35 miles from Belzoni. I went into a store last night and the only not frozen fish were tilapia from Costa Rica and salmon. I can get live crayfish nearby and the Leland crawfish festival will be in a few weeks. My favorite local fish would be sunfish like bream or crappie.

http://lelandchamber.com/customcontent/members/admin/2017_Poster.png

http://hottytoddy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/crawfish.jpg

switters
04-11-2019, 08:57 AM
Seafood in Colorado?

Rocky mountain oysters of course, at Bruces's

https://brucesbar123.com/files/2019/02/3966820d39cf2bd64923fa090649209f.jpg?w=316&h=237&a=t

hawkeye54
04-11-2019, 08:59 AM
Gotta love that poster, Jimmy - thanks for posting !!!

StevenBauer
04-11-2019, 09:08 AM
When Ted ordered the seafood combo at the Festival in Brest there was stuff on there I’d never seen before. Whelks, Cockles, all kinds of stuff:sorry for the bad pic35315

AlanMc
04-11-2019, 09:23 AM
that's a helluva combo!

David G
04-11-2019, 09:40 AM
It is pretty good eats here...
Wild local seafood;
Black Cod (Sablefish)
Albacore
King Salmon
Dungeness Crab
Squid
Sole
California Halibut
Prawns
Sea Bass
Sardines
Sand Dabs
Rockfish
Chinook Salmon
Herring
Ling Cod
Anchovies
Octopus


Farmed local seafood;
Anchovies
Mussels
Oysters
Clams

edit;
Most of the common fresh water species are available here also

We're not that far apart - so this is pretty much our list also. Ditto to the crawfish also. And add shad (only the roe mostly, but the meat is scrumptious if you've got the patience to rake it off the zillions of bones). (Note - 'king' and 'chinook' are the same fish).

My personal favorites are oysters, shrimp, salmon, clams, shad roe, mussels, and ling cod.

We have 4 very good fishmongers in town that I know of. One caters to the yuppie crowd, with overpriced everything but excellent quality, and very spiffy presentation. Two are run by asian families - funky ambiance but everything it uber-fresh with large selection. And the last one was started, iirc, by some fishermen who moved up from the coast. Smaller selection, but also very fresh and very knowledgeable. The last 3 are in the same neighborhood, not far from my son's house, so it's easy to find what you're after if there's any in town.

ron ll
04-11-2019, 09:43 AM
Is stuff that comes from inland rivers and lakes actually called SEAfood?

Canoeyawl
04-11-2019, 09:47 AM
. (Note - 'king' and 'chinook' are the same fish).

.

Not thinking well, meant to write Coho

Crawfish we have, but what a lot of effort for little food.

edit; a more comprehensive list is here
http://www.sfbaywildlife.info/species/fish.htm

Steve McMahon
04-11-2019, 09:47 AM
Lobster - short season
Snow Crab - hard to get
Northern Shimp - hard to get
Scallops - seasonal
Wild Blue Mussels - free for the taking when ice free
Farmed mussels - cheap and relatively easy to get
Cod - limited recreational fishery, need to buy lots from commercial fisherman in fall to last through the winter
Brook trout, mud trout in season
Mackerel - limited season
Caplin - in season (not for me)
Squid - cyclical (not for me)
Farmed Atlantic Salmon - lots of supply (not for me)
Wild Salmon - dependent on the year and conditions if the rivers are open or if there is an allowance to keep one or more.

Dan McCosh
04-11-2019, 10:01 AM
Mainly we have whitefish and perch. Mike's and O'brien's, respectively.

S.V. Airlie
04-11-2019, 10:20 AM
Shad in season which is like two weeks in April. Can't get it at any other time. Also smelts freshly caught on a moonlit night in the early spring

Peerie Maa
04-11-2019, 10:22 AM
When Ted ordered the seafood combo at the Festival in Brest there was stuff on there I’d never seen before. Whelks, Cockles, all kinds of stuff:sorry for the bad pic35315

Cockles are good, normally pub food cooked and pickled in vinegar. Never fancied whelks, they look a bit rubbery.
We had a good meal of brown crab at a dock side bistro in Brest, served hot from the pot with boiled potatoes, crusty bread and a small wooden mallet.

Flying Orca
04-11-2019, 10:54 AM
I'm a little far south right now, but let me tell you about maktaaq: it's whale skin, usually beluga in the places where I lived, with a slightly nutty flavour, best when pickled (that would be the food and the consumer). With a consistency reminiscent of the best winter tires, it provides an excellent jaw workout.

Then there's my dad's specialty, clam necks from the stomach of a walrus. He claims that the stomach acids provide a piquant marination, and that they are delicious. Others have agreed. I'm not fond of clam necks, so I can't vouch for them.

Ted Hoppe
04-11-2019, 10:59 AM
When Ted ordered the seafood combo at the Festival in Brest there was stuff on there I’d never seen before. Whelks, Cockles, all kinds of stuff:sorry for the bad pic35315

That was fun! Can't wait till we will do that again.

As for now Pauls current local choices. Drive through or in sit down restaurant. :D

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/18/ac/03/18ac03874adabfce3ec50733ed4d3999.jpg

Steve McMahon
04-11-2019, 11:01 AM
I'm a little far south right now, but let me tell you about maktaaq: it's whale skin, usually beluga in the places where I lived, with a slightly nutty flavour, best when pickled (that would be the food and the consumer). With a consistency reminiscent of the best winter tires, it provides an excellent jaw workout.

Then there's my dad's specialty, clam necks from the stomach of a walrus. He claims that the stomach acids provide a piquant marination, and that they are delicious. Others have agreed. I'm not fond of clam necks, so I can't vouch for them.

Are Prairie Oysters not local to you? :d

birlinn
04-11-2019, 11:44 AM
Crab
Spider crab
Lobster
Squat Lobster
Langoustines
Prawns
Scallops
Mackerel
Haddock
Saithe
Razorfish
Oysters
Cockles
Mussels (a lot of farmed, plus pick your own)
Whelks
Farmed Salmon ( a lot)
Trout (wild and farmed)

Quite a lot of the shellfish gets exported to France and Spain.

C. Ross
04-11-2019, 12:23 PM
Oh, my. A thread about fish on a forum about boats. Talk about waving a red flag at a bull.

As can be expected from my previous posts about where I live, fish is a big deal around here. Compared to our friends and neighbours in the area, we don't eat that much fish - probably no more than two or three times a week. We do tend to be a bit fussy over freshness, since most of the seafood we eat is less than 24 hours out of the water. That said, around here we have these local seafoods:

lobster
snow crab
shrimp
scallops
mussels
clams
razor clams
oysters
periwinkles
haddock (probably our favourite)
halibut
cod
hake
salmon
shark
tuna
mackerel
herring
trout
perch

Since I can get most of these at the local grocery or directly from the fishing boat, I don't go fishing myself.

Happy for you, trying incredibly hard not to be jealous.

Some of those fish are flown here fresh and I live near an excellent fishmonger, but it’s not the same.

I REALLY need to get to the Maritimes....

CWSmith
04-11-2019, 12:24 PM
I moved back to northern New England in 2003 and I have not eaten a lobster yet! I go to the restaurant, think about a nice lobster, and order a plate of bay scallops. I love bay scallops!

I grew up on craps, learned the charm of oysters, and eat shrimp every chance I get.

Ras Baba
04-11-2019, 12:35 PM
A dozen Appalachicola oysters on the half shell with a sauce mignonette.
pan-fried red snapper filet with a remoulade.
turn the snapper carcass into a court boullion (koo beyon).

C. Ross
04-11-2019, 12:42 PM
Is stuff that comes from inland rivers and lakes actually called SEAfood?

I guess. Or just “fish”.

Some of it is excellent. Keith already posted about walleye, from Lake Superior we get excellent herring (Cisco), lake trout, lake whitefish (a salmon), lake sturgeon. I grew up eating panfish - sunfish, crappies, bass, even bullheads make a great fish fry. There’s attempts to commercialize Mississippi River carp, so far it’s mostly eaten by Asians and Eastern Europeans witha tradition of eating carp. I’ve had smoked Mississippi catfish and carp. It’s pretty good!

George Jung
04-11-2019, 12:44 PM
Long John Silver's count? :P


Used to catch a lot of walleye, striped bass, northern and smallies - when I lived in SD, on the Missouri river. Now, it's frozen from the grocery stores - or our local Surf/Turf, which flies it in fresh - and an appropriate price increase.

Breakaway
04-11-2019, 12:51 PM
Wow. Tough one. From flounder from the creek across the street to mah-mahi and tuna 20 miles or more offshore, I dig most all of it. But if I try to stay very local, here's my picks.

Peconic Bay Scallops are one of my faves. These are small meats, about an inch in diameter. Sweet and tasty. We can get fresh/ local sea scallops,from the ocean, year round. Those are good and have much larger meats. They do not compare to the sweetness and tenderness of bay scallops.


35337

Anglerfish ( aka, Monkfish, aka Goosefish) Particularly appropriate to this thread as they offer a taste and a firm-textured flesh-just like lobster. It's just the tails that are eaten, though there is some cheek meat to be had, and the head can be used for chowder/ stock.
35336

Ling. ( Red Hake) Just had some the other day a bud dropped off. These are rarely offered in fish markets because the flesh turns mushy very quickly. Fresh caught locally, they offer a buttery, flavorful flesh. We love 'em. They are long and skinny; sort of like a fat eel and nearly as slimy. They don't fight much. But, oh, so good. Here's my bud, Mike, with a medium sized one.

35338


Kevin

wizbang 13
04-11-2019, 01:04 PM
Copper River Salmon when home .
“Lambi” , ( conch) , in the islands .
No farmed fish. Guck .

David G
04-11-2019, 01:16 PM
35338[/ATTACH]


Kevin

Looks like you have a different species you call Ling.

Here's the West Coast version

http://lingcodfishing.net/LingCodFishingSlideShow/images/DSC_0054.jpg

http://lingcodfishing.net/

https://anglersclub.com/tips/oregon-ling-cod/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lingcod

Peerie Maa
04-11-2019, 01:25 PM
We catch ling in the Irish Sea.
https://www.fishisthedish.co.uk/assets/images/_headerImages/ling.jpg
Usually a grey colour though, not russet like that one

Old Dryfoot
04-11-2019, 01:28 PM
About the only thing locally that carries any notoriety would be Fanny Bay Oysters.

Breakaway
04-11-2019, 01:31 PM
Looks like you have a different species you call Ling.

Yep. Different altogether.


Usually a grey colour though, not russet like that one

I think they are the same species, Nick. They vary in color somewhat, depending upon the bottom composition and time of year. Also, they will tend to get a silver/grey cast ( like many fish) after being deaded and iced.

Kevin

Breakaway
04-11-2019, 01:38 PM
Looks like you have a different species you call Ling.

Yep. Different altogether.


Usually a grey colour though, not russet like that one

I think they are the same species, Nick. They vary in color somewhat, depending upon the bottom composition and time of year. Also, they will tend to get a silver/grey cast ( like many fish) after being deaded and iced.

Kevin

Flying Orca
04-11-2019, 01:45 PM
Are Prairie Oysters not local to you? :d

I suppose they could be, but I wouldn't eat that food even if I could see it!

Flying Orca
04-11-2019, 01:48 PM
I’ve had smoked Mississippi catfish and carp. It’s pretty good!

One genuine Winnipeg specialty is smoked goldeye (Hiodon tergisus (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldeye)).

Flying Orca
04-11-2019, 01:53 PM
Saltwater ling in the Atlantic is probably common ling, Molva molva. Freshwater ling cod, aka burbot and a whole bunch of other names, is the closely related Lota lota.

Not sure what that west coast one would be.

Garret
04-11-2019, 01:54 PM
While I've seen it mentioned in lists, I have to shout out halibut. Fantastic flavor - though not cheap.

Here in VT, ice fishing produces tons of perch. Fried up (usually breaded & deep fried) it is very tasty. Then there are brookies (trout) fried in some butter in a cast iron pan over an open fire when camping. Doesn't get any better than that.

David G
04-11-2019, 01:56 PM
Saltwater ling in the Atlantic is probably common ling, Molva molva. Freshwater ling cod, aka burbot and a whole bunch of other names, is the closely related Lota lota.

Not sure what that west coast one would be.

It was in one of my links. Never seen the latin name before: Ophiodon elongatus.

J.Madison
04-11-2019, 02:00 PM
I caught a 24" King salmon last night, and had it for dinner an hour later. Living the good life.

David G
04-11-2019, 02:04 PM
I caught a 24" King salmon last night, and had it for dinner an hour later. Living the good life.

Some variation of this was quite common when I lived in Astoria. Various types of salmon. And oysters, steelhead, razor clams, sturgeon, mussels, and halibut. Now, living in Portland, I'm mostly dependent upon the fishmongers - unless a buddy drops by with a care package.

Breakaway
04-11-2019, 02:07 PM
Saltwater ling in the Atlantic is probably common ling, Molva molva.

It's:

35347

Kevin

George Jung
04-11-2019, 02:10 PM
It's:

35347

Kevin

Where are our poets? This Hake deserves a haiku!

BrianY
04-11-2019, 02:19 PM
Where are our poets? This Hake deserves a haiku!

How about a limerick?

There is fish called a hake
Which never lives in a lake
It's found in the sea
Where all tasty fish be
And an excellent meal it does make.

hnsbrc
04-11-2019, 02:23 PM
I have to admit that I am a fresh fish snob and though I love fishing and do a lot of it I won't bring any home to put in the freezer. Mostly it's catch and release but I will keep a couple for a fresh meal at times, often as shore lunch or a late brunch after fishing the morning. As Cris and Keith stated Walleye is king here in Minnesota for eating but my wife likes Crappies and panfish so sometimes I will filet enough of those to keep her happy.

35348
Walleyes are often active after dark or in low light conditions. Trego believes in taste and release fishing.

35349
Early fall Walleye, Voyageurs National Park.

Bruce

Old Dryfoot
04-11-2019, 02:27 PM
Walleye is amazing. It and halibut are at the top of the list for me

Flying Orca
04-11-2019, 03:01 PM
It's:

Oh, THAT one. That's the problem with colloquial names for fish - the older names tend to be shared by a bunch of species.

Flying Orca
04-11-2019, 03:04 PM
Walleye is amazing. It and halibut are at the top of the list for me

Around here they are often known as "pickerel", which is a bit daft by my standards (hellooooo, Esox niger!), but whatever. Pickerel cheeks are a delicacy akin to scallops.

John Meachen
04-11-2019, 03:12 PM
Our best known would be Cromer crabs and then there are the inevitable cockles and whelks (which go really well with garlic mayonnaise if you get the chance to try them) and then there are the usual inshore fish.Sea trout crop up from time to time and there are soles inshore if the fishermen know where to look.Still some herring around in season,but they are a hard sell these days and our Dutch neighbours are happy to get them.

Old Dryfoot
04-11-2019, 03:14 PM
Around here they are often known as "pickerel", which is a bit daft by my standards (hellooooo, Esox niger!), but whatever. Pickerel cheeks are a delicacy akin to scallops.

Pickerel is the name I know from my youth as well, so I try to stick to Walleye now. Because people look at you funny when they think you're telling them Pike is a tasty fish.

S.V. Airlie
04-11-2019, 03:22 PM
Four years in Maine, I ate an average of ten lobsters a week when I was on the coast. I knew a lot of lobster boat haulers and often gave them to me for free. I went home one weekend and mt parents welcomed me and said they were going out for lobster! Let me tell ya, that rare cheeseburger tasted great.

Bobcat
04-11-2019, 03:26 PM
At the end of the salmon trolling season in 1980, I sat with a bunch of fishermen complaining about the poor season, lamenting that they would have to work in the winter, while we ate Dungeness crab until we couldn't eat anymore. Probably several hundred dollars of crab....

Todd D
04-11-2019, 03:36 PM
In terms of commercial seafood you can get lobster year round, although it is pricey and a bit harder to find in the winter. Local scallops are only available fresh during the season (late November through Mid April). Haddock, halibut, hake, swordfish, tuna and very occasionally cod are available, but the quality is generally pretty poor locally since most fish are landed down south (Portland) and "fresh" fish is anywhere from a 3-4 days to weeks old when it gets here. You an also get crab meat (you can only buy whole crabs direct from fishers not in the stores). Clams, muscles and oysters are available, but risky due to frequent wide spread closures. There hasn't been a shimp fishery in Maine for quite a few years. Atlantic salmon is also available, but it is hard to get the local stuff since it comes from all over the place (Canada, Norway, etc.). In my opinion farmed Atlantic Salmon is too fatty and not worth buying. I do get some each year directly from the local salmon farm. That fish is better than what you can buy in the store simply because it is fresh - still alive when you get it. A great deal of the fish sold in the stores is FAS (frozen at sea) although it is sold thawed. The local fish monger gets his fish from the same supplier as the grocery store.

As far as recreational fishing goes, you can catch trout in the local lakes and streams. Ocean fishing is much more limited. The only fish you can catch reliably is mackerel. You can occasionally catch small pollock or cod. I know people who catch halibut and tuna, but that requires a boat that can go out 25 to 50 miles and many people go for years without catching a tuna. In general the local waters are pretty fished out.

In general the quality of local seafood is poor except for lobster and scallops in the winter.

Garret
04-11-2019, 03:42 PM
At the end of the salmon trolling season in 1980, I sat with a bunch of fishermen complaining about the poor season, lamenting that they would have to work in the winter, while we ate Dungeness crab until we couldn't eat anymore. Probably several hundred dollars of crab....

Helping a friend bring a boat from the Abacos to New York, we caught a 35-40 lb. blackfin tuna. Only 5 of us aboard. First & last time I had to stop eating tuna sashimi because I was too full.

heimlaga
04-11-2019, 03:56 PM
I need to define what I mean with local. Within 30 nautical miles up or down the coast and within sight of land and within easy walking distance from the shore and within easy rowing distance upriver.

Our lookal seafoods caught in the brackish sea water or in the river mouths or lakes are with Swedish names in italic and with commercially fished species in bold letters:

Strömming=Herring Traditionally salted in firkins by the fishermen at their camps before bringing the salt fish home. Nowadays often fresh or frozen. Eaten fried or boiled or smoked or baked in oven or anything in between in many dozens of varieties. Anything from salt herrings boiled with potatoes to the most elaborate dishes.
Fermented herring was popular in times long gone they say but the practice died out many generations ago. On the Swedish coast some 50 nautical miles to the west they still uphold the tradition and eat it with flat bread and potatoes.
We quit fishing herring for househiold needs and quit eating herring a couple of years ago. Many others did too. I miss the taste. The herring got too poisoned with borate fire retardants.
Those chemicals should be strictly controlled worldwide.
Mankind is a part of the food chain whether we want it or not with herring as a very important part of the diet. One can almost say that mankind spread north to eat herring. Man has eaten herring for as long as there has been a Baltic sea for the herring to live in and any Homo Sapiens around to eat it. If you cannot eat herring without risking your health it is more than time to stop pollution!

Sik=Whitefish Fried or smoked or baked in oven or used in more elaborate dishes. Smoked is best. Makes wonderful fish soup with potatoes and carrots and peas. I like fish soup and smoked whitefish is one of my absolute favorites.

Gädda=Pike Made to fish balls or fried or baked in oven. By far best as fish balls. Woderfully tasty fish balls with onions. One of my favourite foods. The biggest pikes taste sawdust and are only good for animal fodder. A few still make lutefisk the old way from dried pike and birch ash.

Abborre=Perch Fried or smoked. Both are good. Some boil them in the same kettle as the potatoes.

Gös=Pikeperch Usually fried. A delicacy.

Braxen=Bream Smoked. Usually goes to animal fodder theese days but as late as the 60-ies it was a staple food in early summer.

Gråsäl=Grey seal Used as any meat. Makes wonderful meatballs they say.

Vikare=Ringed seal Used as any meat. Makes wonderful meatballs they say.

Nejonöga=Lamprey No idea how they eat those things but they say lamprey is a delicacy. Personally I prefere to live in doubt.

And when you are fortunate enough to catch one the occasional wild lax=salmon or öring=salmon trout you eat and enjoy but the commercially caugt ones go for high prices to the rich. They are usually fried or smoked.

Of cause there is lots farmed lax=salmon available in any amount in every supermarket but it tastes of the same bone meal fodder as farmed salmon from anywhere else and is not worthy of mentioning as seafood only as a functional protein fodder for humans. Farmed salmon seems to be a staple in modern cooking and can be used in any number of ways. In my oppinion it is tasty only as fish soup with potatoes and carrots and peas and so on. In any other form I eat it as bulk protein.

A few people eat mört=roach and id=ide and siklöja (a very very small species of whitefish eaten whole bones and intestines and all) but to most of us they are only animal fodder. In the past people ate simpa=horn sculpin and ruda (a very small and bony carp) especially during hard times.

Vassrötter=reed roots dredged out of the mud at river mouths and in shallow bays using long handled hooks and then dried and ground to a starch rich flour which could be mixed with either real flour or flour from the dried inner bark of scot's pine trees and baked to bread or boiled to porridge saved the life and health of lots of people during the "poor years" in the 1860-ies. Reed roots are nutricious and pine bark flour isn't bad either according to modern science but the processing is too laborious to make it anything but an an emergency backup...... let's hope that we will never again have any such emergencies.
Reed roots is the only local vegetable seafood that I can think of.

There is also kräfta=crayfish in a few rivers just north of my geographic limits but they are too few to catch nowadays. In the early to mid 1900-s they were more plentiful and when people who lived close by those rivers took a break from working they often sat down by the river bank and tried to catch some crayfish. It was relaxing and a suitable activity during breaks from proper work. The crayfish was sold apiece to village shopkeepers who sold them througs delis in the big cities as posh delicacis for the upper crust. Crayfish wasn't eaten locally.

Ras Baba
04-11-2019, 04:00 PM
My fishing uncle had a Mittle-European recipe for planked carp. Stuff a carp with shredded carrot, onion and celery. Staple it to a cedar shingle. Prop up facing a moderate campfire. Bast it with butter. (Just like a shad roast.) When flaky, throw away the fish and eat the shingle.

Ted Hoppe
04-11-2019, 04:21 PM
Fresh caught anchovies which I catch using a cast net. Salmon if we are lucky.

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-e_hwmVv2ns8/T9Os_aqwT2I/AAAAAAAABKU/PrMW3bgpDYU/s1600/anchovies-fried.jpg

There is always crab when in season.

https://img.grouponcdn.com/deal/m8Ff4kyRChXWGq3hzuss/U1-700x420.jpg/v1/c700x420.jpg

StevenBauer
04-11-2019, 04:34 PM
I caught a 24" King salmon last night, and had it for dinner an hour later. Living the good life.

Jealous.

StevenBauer
04-11-2019, 04:47 PM
Smelt. Haven’t seen them mentioned yet. Pretty tasty.

https://visitaroostook.com/blog/smelt-fishing-northern-maine

elf
04-11-2019, 04:55 PM
I got all the farmed eastern oysters I could eat this winter on my $6 shell fishing permit so on the half shell with Meyer lemon juice first, oyster stew second. In summer I used to be able to catch bluefish which I either baked in white wine and butter or smoked. I love swordfish but no longer eat it because it is way too far up the food chain and full of poisons. Chicken lobsters are very weak in flavor and 2 pounders cost an amazing amount per lb since they’re no longer native. So much for local seafood on Cape Cod.

Joe (SoCal)
04-11-2019, 05:18 PM
We have pretty good eats here



Albacore.
Bigeye Tuna.
Blue Shark.
Bluefin Tuna.
Bonito Shark.
Chinook Salmon.
Coho Salmon.



A great local fishmonger with local caught is Jon's Fish Market in Dana Point Wharf.

35358

https://www.yelp.com/biz/jons-fish-market-dana-point-4

The fresh fish is great, eating there no so great. They can't cook, which is a total shame :(

Garret
04-11-2019, 06:00 PM
If the fish has green stuff around it, or carpet on the floor it ain't a fish market, it's a fish boutique.

Katherine
04-11-2019, 07:26 PM
We have pretty good eats here



Albacore.
Bigeye Tuna.
Blue Shark.
Bluefin Tuna.
Bonito Shark.
Chinook Salmon.
Coho Salmon.



A great local fishmonger with local caught is Jon's Fish Market in Dana Point Wharf.

35358

https://www.yelp.com/biz/jons-fish-market-dana-point-4

The fresh fish is great, eating there no so great. They can't cook, which is a total shame :(
They screw up tuna steaks? Bastards!

L.W. Baxter
04-11-2019, 07:46 PM
October 2nd, 2018, solo trip out of Garibaldi, 14 albacore tuna (200lbs gross approx), legal limits of rockfish and dungeness crab.

35370

35371

35372

timfish
04-13-2019, 07:57 AM
35430
A sample of what we have. Cod, haddock, and flounders.

CK 17
04-13-2019, 08:06 AM
Inspired by the Maine versus Canadian lobster thread

What are the common varieties of local seafood, both recreationally and commercially available to you? What do you tend to purchase at the fishmonger or order at restaurants and what do you prefer to fish for yourself?

carp

Reynard38
04-13-2019, 08:14 AM
Shrimp, crab (soft shells now), oysters, flounder, redfish, cobia. I believe wahoo as well at times.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
04-13-2019, 11:31 AM
We catch ling in the Irish Sea.
https://www.fishisthedish.co.uk/assets/images/_headerImages/ling.jpg
Usually a grey colour though, not russet like that one

British rod caught record is over 60 pounds...
Ling Molva molva 67-5-0 2013 J. Isbister Muckle Flugga, Shetland Isles

StevenBauer
04-13-2019, 01:53 PM
Shrimp, crab (soft shells now), oysters, flounder, redfish, cobia. I believe wahoo as well at times.

Oh, man, my dad used to make me soft shell crab sandwiches. So good. I haven’t had one in years.