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kjm
07-22-2001, 07:46 AM
anyone ever built one of buehler's powerboats? if so i'd like to hear particularly about the mechanicals- car engines etc any info appreciated

PugetSound
07-23-2001, 12:34 AM
Woodenboat did an article on installing a Mazda engine in a boat. This was a couple of years ago but you should be able to find it using the search feature on this site.

Briefly, the following are the basics of what you'll have to consider (note that some are Mandatory and some aren't):
1. Fuel delivery system has to be completely gone over because car engines generally have fuel vents near or on the fuel pump. That fuel pump must go. This is the big Mandatory requirement.
2. Depending on how your engine will be sitting when installed, you will probably have to get an adaptor for the carborator. This is a metal wedge which goes between the carb body and the intake manifold so that the carb will be more or less level in operation.
3. Backfire spark arrestor (in place of the air cleaner). This is also Mandatory.
4. Exaust manifolds will probably have to be replaced with ones that have cooling jackets. Depending on your engine, this will run you the better part of a grand. An alternative (for some designs) is to use a dry-stack arrangement (i.e. you keep the automotive exaust manifolds and pipe it to an old fashioned smoke stack). Disadvantage of the dry-stack arrangement is that it is Noisy and hot (and would look funny on some designs).
5. Electrical components such as the alternator might have to be replaced with non-sparking marine versions.
6. you will need to afix a bracket similar to the alternator bracket for the installation of the sea water pump. Also, you will need to purchase a heat exchanger (another big ticket item) as well as decide whether or not you want a partial fresh water cooling system or a 100% fresh water cooling system (difference is in whether you pump fresh water into the exaust manifold cooling jackets - need a bigger heat exchanger).
7. You'll need to alter the oil pan (or replace it) so that you can drain the oil without removing the engine. Marine oil pans route a hose from the drain plug so that all you do is remove the cap to the hose.
8. You will need to have some kind of idea as to which marine transmissions will work with your chosen engine (and what adaptors are required).
9. You need to consider the issue of engine mounts. If you opt for resilient mounts (much much quiter -but not cheap) then you'll have to provide for a thrust block.
10. A proper marine fuel filter -one designed for inboard use - is a must. You can get away with not having one on your car, but do without on a boat and you are going to wind up getting towed home alot.
11. You may have noticed that wooden boats generally are not painted on the inside of the hull. This is to allow the wood to breath. The big exception to this is in the engine compartment where you must seal the wood with a good coat of fuel resistant paint. In the event of a fuel spill inside your boat, you do NOT want gasoline soaking into the wood!!!! Let gasoline soak into the wood of the hull and you may as well open the seacock and sink her right there because the only way that fuel will come out of the wood is with heat (as in engine heat ....). I have seen the results of this and it isn't pretty.

I am probably missing some points but these should get you started. Good Luck.

[This message has been edited by PugetSound (edited 07-23-2001).]

Dave Carnell
07-23-2001, 06:26 AM
Search "Subaru" in the index and you will find it.

kjm
07-23-2001, 04:06 PM
You seem knowledgeable and I thank you for your reply.What I forgot to include was that I plan to use a Diesel engine out of aMercedes any input on this would be appreciated.
Originally posted by PugetSound:
Woodenboat did an article on installing a Mazda engine in a boat. This was a couple of years ago but you should be able to find it using the search feature on this site.

Briefly, the following are the basics of what you'll have to consider (note that some are Mandatory and some aren't):
1. Fuel delivery system has to be completely gone over because car engines generally have fuel vents near or on the fuel pump. That fuel pump must go. This is the big Mandatory requirement.
2. Depending on how your engine will be sitting when installed, you will probably have to get an adaptor for the carborator. This is a metal wedge which goes between the carb body and the intake manifold so that the carb will be more or less level in operation.
3. Backfire spark arrestor (in place of the air cleaner). This is also Mandatory.
4. Exaust manifolds will probably have to be replaced with ones that have cooling jackets. Depending on your engine, this will run you the better part of a grand. An alternative (for some designs) is to use a dry-stack arrangement (i.e. you keep the automotive exaust manifolds and pipe it to an old fashioned smoke stack). Disadvantage of the dry-stack arrangement is that it is Noisy and hot (and would look funny on some designs).
5. Electrical components such as the alternator might have to be replaced with non-sparking marine versions.
6. you will need to afix a bracket similar to the alternator bracket for the installation of the sea water pump. Also, you will need to purchase a heat exchanger (another big ticket item) as well as decide whether or not you want a partial fresh water cooling system or a 100% fresh water cooling system (difference is in whether you pump fresh water into the exaust manifold cooling jackets - need a bigger heat exchanger).
7. You'll need to alter the oil pan (or replace it) so that you can drain the oil without removing the engine. Marine oil pans route a hose from the drain plug so that all you do is remove the cap to the hose.
8. You will need to have some kind of idea as to which marine transmissions will work with your chosen engine (and what adaptors are required).
9. You need to consider the issue of engine mounts. If you opt for resilient mounts (much much quiter -but not cheap) then you'll have to provide for a thrust block.
10. A proper marine fuel filter -one designed for inboard use - is a must. You can get away with not having one on your car, but do without on a boat and you are going to wind up getting towed home alot.
11. You may have noticed that wooden boats generally are not painted on the inside of the hull. This is to allow the wood to breath. The big exception to this is in the engine compartment where you must seal the wood with a good coat of fuel resistant paint. In the event of a fuel spill inside your boat, you do NOT want gasoline soaking into the wood!!!! Let gasoline soak into the wood of the hull and you may as well open the seacock and sink her right there because the only way that fuel will come out of the wood is with heat (as in engine heat ....). I have seen the results of this and it isn't pretty.

I am probably missing some points but these should get you started. Good Luck.

[This message has been edited by PugetSound (edited 07-23-2001).]

Dale Harvey
07-23-2001, 07:35 PM
I belive that the OLD four cyl was used as a marine engine base, as was a Japanese copy. Unfortunately the only marine parts will probly have to come from England or Germany. For current engines, forget about the car and get one from a truck. You can probly buy a used Detriot 53 or 71 series in running order cheaper than you can properly convert the Mercedes.

Steve Souther
07-23-2001, 10:27 PM
Dodge uses a Cummins diesel that is pretty nice, too.

Zumsel
05-11-2002, 05:12 PM
If you are looking for a very good resource for marinizing parts for car and truck engines, look at www.lancingmarine.com (http://www.lancingmarine.com) They are also building their own range of marine diesel engines based on ford engines.

Jochen