PDA

View Full Version : A question for our professional pilots



Rich Jones
03-13-2019, 03:51 PM
While skiing today, I was on the lower summit of Okemo Mountian at 3300' elevation. The upper summit is at 3600'.
Just as I get off the chairlift, a Cape Air regional plane flys over at barely 500' of altitude. Cape Air flies Cessna 402 twin engine, eight passenger planes.
It seemed to me that skimming a mountaintop by a commercial flight would be a no-no. What would you guys say?
This flight is one of three daily between Boston, Ma. and Rutland, Vermont. Okemo would be the highest terrain that it would have to clear.
Weather at the time was clear sky and excellent visibility.
These flight also pass right over my house. High enough not to be a bother. But I have noticed that they often fly at different altitudes and slightly different flight paths. Wouldn't a regular flight like this follow the same path and height constantly?

David W Pratt
03-13-2019, 05:47 PM
No idea, but my wife was also at Okemo today

Rich Jones
03-13-2019, 07:31 PM
No idea, but my wife was also at Okemo todayThe skiing conditions were stellar!

Rich Jones
03-14-2019, 07:43 AM
Crickets. No interest from the aviation crowd?

Paul Girouard
03-14-2019, 09:55 PM
While skiing today, I was on the lower summit of Okemo Mountian at 3300' elevation. The upper summit is at 3600'.
Just as I get off the chairlift, a Cape Air regional plane flys over at barely 500' of altitude. Cape Air flies Cessna 402 twin engine, eight passenger planes.
It seemed to me that skimming a mountaintop by a commercial flight would be a no-no. What would you guys say?
This flight is one of three daily between Boston, Ma. and Rutland, Vermont. Okemo would be the highest terrain that it would have to clear.
Weather at the time was clear sky and excellent visibility.
These flight also pass right over my house. High enough not to be a bother. But I have noticed that they often fly at different altitudes and slightly different flight paths. Wouldn't a regular flight like this follow the same path and height constantly?


A commercial flight would be on a designed flight path , one would think. BUT like Washington State ferries have been known to run aground when the Capt. Took a girl friend for a “Joy ride” by deviating from the normal course , It is possible a pilot of a 8 passenger aircraft could have taken some liberties with the flight plan.

Regular flights: Are still subject to change due to wind direction at the departing air field , or the end destination, as well as weather / wind aloft / weather fronts they’d avoid , etc.

So the short answer to both is yes and no , it depends.

BrianW
03-15-2019, 12:06 AM
An outfit running airplanes that small probably doesn't fly published routes between airports. Not until required when arriving or departing a controlled airport or airspace.

I'm not a pilot.

skuthorp
03-15-2019, 04:02 AM
I recall skiing down a ridge here, probably below 5000 feet when an F111 flew past my nose leaving a rooster tail of snow. I was well into the back country, not near a resort or run.

Rich Jones
03-15-2019, 05:20 AM
I've read one regulation that states an aircraft must be at least 500' off the ground in uncongested areas and 1000' above the highest point in mountainous terrain. By that standard, the plane was certainly too low. Pilot probably did it to impress passengers.