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isla
03-09-2019, 01:50 PM
Members of the public have been able to wander along the bottom of a drained section of the UK's biggest canal.

A stretch at Fort Augustus has been emptied of water so that lock gates can be replaced, and this section was opened to the public on Friday.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-47496621

Replacing a lock gate at Kytra..

https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/6C73/production/_105636772_locklast.jpg

https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/398E/production/_105943741_canalthree.jpg.jpg

Breakaway
03-09-2019, 01:51 PM
Any good, " finds?"

Kevin

Art Haberland
03-09-2019, 02:03 PM
nicer than I anticipated

isla
03-09-2019, 02:06 PM
Any good, " finds?"

Kevin

Don't know yet |;)

Back in 2017 there was a good TV detective drama called 'The Loch', set on Loch Ness and around Fort Augustus, where a body was found in the loch with feet encased in concrete. So you never know |:)

Magnet fishing in canals has become a popular hobby here in the UK. These guys found a load of old guns in a canal down in the south of England. Police are concerned that somebody might haul up an old grenade or unexploded bomb.

https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2017/09/05/17/43EE80DC00000578-0-image-a-1_1504627686997.jpg

And elsewhere

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSLv0J0XBNP9mX2c2LXZPoCYNvF7c_jD JpEL3DdWdgF5wBgcw1lcA

Peerie Maa
03-09-2019, 02:10 PM
^ They all look as though they were rendered useless before being dumped.

isla
03-09-2019, 02:16 PM
^ I think this find is a bit more serious..
https://www.unilad.co.uk/crime/guy-reels-in-massive-bag-of-guns-while-magnet-fishing/

Jim Bow
03-09-2019, 02:21 PM
I enjoyed this guys enthusiasm

https://youtu.be/OZeXcH4hmtY

isla
03-09-2019, 02:29 PM
^ Fascinating, thanks Jim.

Breakaway
03-09-2019, 02:42 PM
^ They all look as though they were rendered useless before being dumped.

Disassembly might be thought to weapons used in crimes harder to find, though disposal of different pieces in different places probably makes more sense for thwarting efforts to recover evidence ( as these photos show).

Kevin

Ian McColgin
03-09-2019, 02:45 PM
Reading the Frieda Klein series by "Nicci French" has introduced me to London's hidden rivers. Fascinating.

Art Haberland
03-09-2019, 03:09 PM
sounds an interesting job

Peerie Maa
03-09-2019, 06:05 PM
I enjoyed this guys enthusiasm


Reminded me of this :D

Memories of pulling the 'plug' on canal

Published: 13:24 Updated: 20:27 Wednesday 02 May 2007
Share this article


WHEN Worksop British Water Board worker Bill Thorpe dredged the Chesterfield Canal back in 1978, he thought it was like any other day.

But when he returned the next day, he discovered that he had accidentally pulled out the canal’s ‘plug’ and that part of the canal had drained away.

That was the memory of Bill’s aunt, Pat Ward, 70, of St John’s Court, Worksop, this week – who said that Bill could not believe his eyes when he saw what had happened.

“He was getting rubbish out of the canal and his machine must have caught the chain of the plug. No one even knew the plug was there and everyone got a big surprise the next day,” said Pat.

Bill, formerly of Chesterton Drive, and his team pulled the plug that sat between Worksop Town Lock and Whit Sunday Pie Lock in Retford, and overnight, the area had completely drained.
“He was so surprised about what had happened because they did not even know the plug was there,” said Pat.
Bill, a father of two, who sadly died from a heart attack at 42, 12 years ago, was in his early 20s when he pulled the plug.
The black and white photograph had been forgotten for some time – until Pat read a letter in the Guardian last week referring to the incident.


“It brought it all back to me and I realised that there was still interest in it and thought there may be others who would like to look at the picture,” said Pat.
Chesterfield Canal Trust said that the plug would have been included in the designs for the canal when the plans were drawn up in the 1770s.
“Every canal has some sort of drainage system and that is how they are maintained,” said Peter Piper from the Trust.

isla
03-09-2019, 06:56 PM
^ Or this..

Boater accidentally drains Kennet and Avon Canal
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-44869566

isla
03-09-2019, 07:04 PM
For those of you who were expecting a story about actually walking under water along the Caledonian canal, I can go one better. Here's a guy who walked the 26 mile length of Loch Ness, along the bottom, in an air-diving suit..

The ways of getting from one end of Loch Ness to the other are many and varied. A leisurely sail, perhaps. Or, for the more intrepid among us, a long-distance swim.
Then there is the hard way. Yesterday 41-year-old Lloyd Scott emerged from the cold, murky waters at Lochend, near Inverness, having completed the world's first underwater marathon.
Clad in a 180lb antique diving suit and impressive brass helmet and lead boots, the former firefighter from Rainham, in Essex, took 12 days to make his gruelling 26-mile trek.

https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/12530303.diver-completes-monster-walk-under-loch-ness/

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/3176730.stm

isla
03-10-2019, 08:59 AM
^ Just realized that Lloyd Scott is the same guy who 'ran' the London marathon in his diving suit in 2002. It took him six days to finish the course..

https://media.gettyimages.com/photos/lloyd-scott-dressed-in-deepsea-diving-gear-crosses-the-finish-line-to-picture-id2516434

Jim Bow
03-10-2019, 10:08 AM
Reading the Frieda Klein series by "Nicci French" has introduced me to London's hidden rivers. Fascinating.
You'd enjoy the Bryant and May series by Christopher Fowler. Crimes laced with London history and myth. Two young policemen assigned to a special police unit in 1940 with no mandatory retirement are still at work at age 90.
Give 'em a try.

Paul Pless
03-10-2019, 10:47 AM
i thought carrying big fixed blade knives in england was verboten. . .
^ Just realized that Lloyd Scott is the same guy who 'ran' the London marathon in his diving suit in 2002. It took him six days to finish the course..

https://media.gettyimages.com/photos/lloyd-scott-dressed-in-deepsea-diving-gear-crosses-the-finish-line-to-picture-id2516434

isla
03-10-2019, 01:44 PM
i thought carrying big fixed blade knives in england was verboten. . .

There are exceptions, although I'm not sure that taking part in a charity run is one of them.

Examples of good reasons to carry a knife or weapon in public can include:



taking knives you use at work to and from work
taking it to a gallery or museum to be exhibited
if it’ll be used for theatre, film, television, historical reenactment or religious purposes, for example the kirpan some Sikhs carry
if it’ll be used in a demonstration or to teach someone how to use it

A court will decide if you’ve got a good reason to carry a knife or a weapon if you’re charged with carrying it illegally.

AnalogKid
03-10-2019, 03:19 PM
I enjoyed this guys enthusiasm

https://youtu.be/OZeXcH4hmtY

I'm constantly amazed that the weird and obscure videos that are part of my YouTube feed turn up so regularly here.

AndyG
03-10-2019, 04:01 PM
My workmate, Igor, is on holiday this month in Poland, magnet-fishing in various swamps, lakes and rivers. "Anything you want, Andy?" "Yeah," I said, "Bring me back a T34, bardzo dziękuję."

isla
03-27-2019, 11:33 AM
Bump..

Looks like the canal repairs are not going quite as planned. Good job we're not planning a trip through this year.

A stretch of the Caledonian Canal is to remain closed to traffic for longer than expected due to a delay completing a major refurbishment.
Scottish Canals said it had encountered "unexpected issues" with the "the historic fabric" of the lock chambers at Fort Augustus and nearby Kytra.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-47719527

C. Ross
03-27-2019, 12:46 PM
In the OP, I'm surprised to see that the bottom of the canal is paved.

Fun stuff. A canal trip through some part of England is on my bucket list.

Figment
03-27-2019, 12:52 PM
ah, "historic fabric". I spent some time working with English Heritage about 20 yrs ago. How they loved that phrase!

isla
03-27-2019, 03:20 PM
Fun stuff. A canal trip through some part of England is on my bucket list.

The Caledonian canal has been an integral part of our lives in recent years. So much so that I yearn for something different. The Llangollen Canal is definitely on my bucket list because it's over forty years since we lived in Wales and I'm very keen to get down there again.

Apart from the Welsh countryside there is a steam railway, horse-drawn narrowboats, and Telford’s famous aqueduct. Known as 'the stream in the sky' Pontcysyllte is 126ft above the River Dee as it crosses the valley. The canal runs in a steel trough across the aqueduct, and there are no barriers on one side. There is just a short steel lip between the boat and a sheer drop to the valley floor. Scary stuff.

Nick would probably try to persuade you to visit the Lancaster canal, much of which runs alongside Morecambe Bay. There are so many to choose from.

Here's a guide..
https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/enjoy-the-waterways/canal-and-river-network

skuthorp
03-27-2019, 03:22 PM
I've seen a video of a trip across that aqueduct, even that was scary and I'm not bad at heights!

isla
03-27-2019, 03:27 PM
I've seen a video of a trip across that aqueduct, even that was scary and I'm not bad at heights!

This one is good - maybe the same one?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OFsbeX1ZRG8

C. Ross
03-27-2019, 06:16 PM
The Caledonian canal has been an integral part of our lives in recent years. So much so that I yearn for something different. The Llangollen Canal is definitely on my bucket list because it's over forty years since we lived in Wales and I'm very keen to get down there again.

Apart from the Welsh countryside there is a steam railway, horse-drawn narrowboats, and Telford’s famous aqueduct. Known as 'the stream in the sky' Pontcysyllte is 126ft above the River Dee as it crosses the valley. The canal runs in a steel trough across the aqueduct, and there are no barriers on one side. There is just a short steel lip between the boat and a sheer drop to the valley floor. Scary stuff.

Nick would probably try to persuade you to visit the Lancaster canal, much of which runs alongside Morecambe Bay. There are so many to choose from.

Here's a guide..
https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/enjoy-the-waterways/canal-and-river-network

OK, THAT was one hell of a rabbit hole to descend into. Great, great stuff. Thanks.