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Jim Bow
11-10-2018, 07:07 PM
Was chatting with a woman who's the daughter of a DDay vet. He was a Lt in the Big Red One at Omaha Beach.
He was awarded the French Legion of Honor. It was presented to him by, of all people, George Patton.
Like a lot of vets, he never talked about anything till he was in his 80s. He didn't recall why it was given to him. He only recalled that it was in November. He was ordered to a spot near Paris where about 50 other guys lined up and Patton and some French guys came down the line and hung ribbons round their necks. A French guy kissed him on both cheeks. Patton shook his hand. His distinct memory was that Patton smelled like cigars.
He also had 3 purple hearts and a Bronze Star.

S.V. Airlie
11-10-2018, 07:11 PM
I wonder why Patton? It was awarded by the French? Interesting!

Bobby of Tulsa
11-10-2018, 07:11 PM
Lots of stuff your mind seems to shut out for years.

S.V. Airlie
11-10-2018, 07:16 PM
Lots of stuff your mind seems to shut out for years.Bobby, I wasn't in the military, you were, you'd know!

Bobby of Tulsa
11-10-2018, 07:35 PM
I am glad you were not. You did not miss one thing.

Paul Pless
11-10-2018, 07:40 PM
My dad spoke about the navy and his fellow sailors and the places he saw very very fondly. No one that I know in my entire life was more knowledgeable about the politics, economics, and history of WWII. He never once during my life spoke to me about what he did or saw in the war. He was on destroyer in Pacific.

S.V. Airlie
11-10-2018, 07:41 PM
I am glad you were not. You did not miss one thing.It was close bobby, one number! Cut off, at least from the chosen. I think mine was something like 185. Can't recall, the draft board chose 185 and lower for the draft. Was sure I was going to be drafted anyway.

Bobby of Tulsa
11-10-2018, 07:47 PM
There was no numbers when I was called just drafted. I feel for those in that great war, they went through living hell. I can't even imagine that trench warfare. mud and blood and poison gas. No thank you.

Bobby of Tulsa
11-10-2018, 07:51 PM
I never have talked to my wife or girls much about my time in the army, for the most part they will probably tell you I just goofed off and that is fine with me. They or any one else really has no need to know about that crap.

S.V. Airlie
11-10-2018, 07:53 PM
I never have talked to my wife or girls much about my time in the army, for the most part they will probably tell you I just goofed off and that is fine with me. They or any one else really has no need to know about that crap.Neither did my father. I think that's a pretty common practice.

S.V. Airlie
11-10-2018, 07:54 PM
There was no numbers when I was called just drafted. I feel for those in that great war, they went through living hell. I can't even imagine that trench warfare. mud and blood and poison gas. No thank you.I do as well, just the pictures are bad enough!

hawkeye54
11-10-2018, 08:06 PM
Back then, 1968 -1969, mail took 3 weeks to go from the South China Sea to the US and 3 weeks back - so, to avoid stressing-out the lovely wife, I did not write anything about what we did / saw. All that careful planning unraveled when I invited one of the junior guys over for dinner, and he just HAD to boast to her about all the stuff he / we experienced !!! |:(

Bobby of Tulsa
11-10-2018, 08:12 PM
I have had pretty good luck as that goes, I had one fellow at an ebs ask me about my army time while my daughter was sitting next to me. I just said I was in to long.

BrianY
11-10-2018, 10:36 PM
My father-in-law was a Army doctor in the Philippines in WWII. He never said anything to his kids about his experience other than that it was horrible and the Japanese were cruel and vicious. We found out after he died that he was awarded the Bronze Star and Oak Leaf Cluster for heroism attending to wounded soldiers under direct enemy fire.

My own father spent his 18 months in the army driving trucks in the Adirondacks, operating a communications station in NY City, guarding German POW's and going to jazz clubs in Harlem. We heard lots of stories about those times. He was in Ranger training for the invasion of Japan when the war ended.

BlueTattoo
11-10-2018, 11:44 PM
My dad beat the draft in WWII by joining the National Guard before the war. That worked out great. It let him see North Africa, Sicily, Italy, and France with the 36th Infantry Division. I don’t know if he ever made it into Germany. He rarely talked about the war and then, usually just funny stories or maybe about meeting a celebrity. Years after he died, I found the citation awarding his Bronze Star with V for valor. I understand why they often don’t talk about the war to people who really can’t understand what they went through. Come to think of it, I don’t think we ever talked about my time in Viet Nam. What I know about WWII is from books. Andy Rooney’s “My War” is a favorite. Also a couple by Stephen Ambrose.

skuthorp
11-11-2018, 05:15 AM
As a child mine was violent, argumentative, undergoing psychological therapy, had been a long term pre-war reservist, left us when I was 11. But he did not go far, I would see him about the area and at the fishing club next to the Life Saving club I belonged to. Mum divorced him, found a marvellous step dad with a collection of brothers and sisters for us. He resurfaced when I was 21, came to the celebration. Mum and Vic. also a returned man, adopted him really, and in turn so did I but he was always difficult if very capable with it. At 94 the navy found him again, I don't think he'd actually ever left it. Then he told them the stories, produced the photographs, identified the men and places, and the navy adopted him again. He was highly decorated by the Dutch, the Phillipines, the US and Australia….I never knew as a young man. The navy gave him a cracking funeral at 97.