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Rum_Pirate
10-17-2018, 01:57 PM
Bar discussion, your input is required:

Is it 'better' to boil water and get a lot of (or all) the dissolved air out of the water to make ice.

So that the ice will not have tiny bubbles in the middle and will last longer.

Breakaway
10-17-2018, 09:10 PM
With air in the ice, my drink is chilled and less diluted by water as the ice melts. Mo betterer, methinks!

Kevin


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Phil Y
10-18-2018, 01:14 AM
Hot water freezes quicker than cold water.


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The Bigfella
10-18-2018, 11:23 AM
Can someone please explain what "dissolved air" is?

Rum_Pirate
10-18-2018, 01:48 PM
Can someone please explain what "dissolved air" is?

Boil a kettle.

The bubbles you see are air that was 'dissolved' in the water.

Flying Orca
10-18-2018, 01:54 PM
Well, no, the bubbles you see are actually steam. But boiling water does remove dissolved gases, which makes for ice that is clearer, more dense, and more difficult to melt.

JTA
10-18-2018, 01:54 PM
you must be smoking some good dope

heimfried
10-18-2018, 02:35 PM
Well, no, the bubbles you see are actually steam. But boiling water does remove dissolved gases, which makes for ice that is clearer, more dense, and more difficult to melt.
If the water is already boiling, the bubbles are steam bubbles, right. But at the time you are starting the heating of cold water, after a while, at a water temperature of about 60 degree Celsius, a lot of small bubbles occure and adhere on the bottom and the walls of the kettle. These bubbles are not out of steam, but air. They are growing and then rising and bursting. The ability of a liquid to dissolve air (or in general gas) decreases with growing temperature.

Flying Orca
10-18-2018, 02:55 PM
If the water is already boiling, the bubbles are steam bubbles, right. But at the time you are starting the heating of cold water, after a while, at a water temperature of about 60 degree Celsius, a lot of small bubbles occure and adhere on the bottom and the walls of the kettle. These bubbles are not out of steam, but air. They are growing and then rising and bursting. The ability of a liquid to dissolve air (or in general gas) decreases with growing temperature.

Ah, yes, those bubbles are indeed air.

ThomRose
10-18-2018, 03:27 PM
Why not use frozen rocks instead of frozen water in your drink? That ensures no dilution. Y>

Rum_Pirate
10-18-2018, 03:31 PM
Why not use frozen rocks instead of frozen water in your drink? That ensures no dilution. Y>

There are steel spheres that you can buy for that as well.


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Art Haberland
10-18-2018, 04:02 PM
well, on this same vein.. how much better is distilled water for ice than say clean Tap water?

robm
10-18-2018, 05:09 PM
"Clean" tap water still has all sorts of stuff in it. Chlorine, minerals, weird compounds formed when chlorine acts on organic matter in the water, etc. Distilled water does not.

I always think it kind of strange, that the distillery tours, where they brag about their water and how important it is to the whisky, then give you a jug of tap water to add to your sample, or to wash it down. (No, I am not a philistine, some whiskies, particularly the very strong ones, taste different and often better with a drop of water. Straight up, with good, cold water to wash it down, gives both experiences. and leaves you capable at the end of the night)

Art Haberland
10-18-2018, 06:42 PM
actually, I can see that. Some places have very good tasting tap water. Where I live has very "sweet" water from the pine barrens. No taste of chemicals or minerals, just a very soft and sweet hint of something as you swallow. It has to some from New Jersey's sandy soil and the ever so slightly acidic pine needles that cover everything. Our streams and rivers are brown from all the natural iron that leached out of the needles