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View Full Version : All my screwups pale in comparison.



Jim Bow
10-15-2018, 10:02 AM
PHOTOS: A technician accidentally triggered an F-16's cannon and blew up another F-16 in Belgium

https://edge.alluremedia.com.au/uploads/businessinsider/2018/10/F16-b.jpg


https://www.businessinsider.com.au/belgium-f16-mechanic-blows-up-another-f16-pics-2018-10#7a4rq5WRdWlEzHVB.99

amish rob
10-15-2018, 10:02 AM
He was watching Jewel Of The Nile.

Peace,
Robert

CWSmith
10-15-2018, 10:04 AM
In all seriousness, that is the kind of mistake that made my wife and I decide we did not want a gun in the house. It just makes every mistake worse. Of course, this is a very BIG gun...

sharpiefan
10-15-2018, 10:21 AM
PHOTOS: A technician accidentally triggered an F-16's cannon and blew up another F-16 in Belgium

https://www.businessinsider.com.au/belgium-f16-mechanic-blows-up-another-f16-pics-2018-10#7a4rq5WRdWlEzHVB.99



That should not be possible without conscious intent. Every aircraft I worked on in the Navy had a 'weight-on-gear' switch, hardwired to the SAFE position. When the plane is on the ground, it disables several systems, including weapons, radar, and flight controls, any of which could be lethal if activated. You had better have a *very* good reason for disabling that switch.

Katherine
10-15-2018, 10:43 AM
Stay away from the yellow wires.

Old Dryfoot
10-15-2018, 10:59 AM
About a month back I snapped the boarding ladder off of a quarter million dollar boom lift, I thought that was a bad day. Now, not so much. . .

Canoeyawl
10-15-2018, 11:37 AM
. Of course, this is a very BIG gun...

With a very small trigger...

skuthorp
10-15-2018, 03:06 PM
Hmm……………. "I wonder what this button does?".

Phil Y
10-15-2018, 03:22 PM
Oops

John of Phoenix
10-15-2018, 04:21 PM
In a similar ground accident, one of my flight school classmates was reloading the rocket pods when one fired as he slid it into the tube. The rocket blasted right through his chest. He was dead before he hit the ground. I must have loaded a couple hundred thousand rockets in my career and never had a problem but I made sure NO ONE stood in front of the tubes when we reloaded.

On a less consequential note, see that red covered switch? It's the wings stores jettison switch that fires explosive cartridges that (duh) jettisons the wing stores. If you look closely, you'll see that the cover is held closed with a thin copper wire. The copper wire is a safety feature to keep the cover closed but is soft enough that it breaks when enough force is applied to pull up the cover. Blowing the rocket pods (or minigun pods) is a serious matter - something has gone drastically wrong and you need to get rid of the weapons and do it NOW. Electrical fire or generator failure? Doesn't matter, the jettison system is hot wired directly to the battery. Pull the cover, flip the switch, BOOM, BOOM, bye-bye wing stores - outboards then inboards.

One of the preflight checks is to make sure that the safety wire is copper (not heavy duty stainless that won't break) and that it is attached to the BASE of the switch rather than to the switch itself because if it's attached to the switch pulling open the cover actuates the switch. In my entire career, I had only one occasion where the wire was done incorrectly - attached to the switch and of course the mechanic forgot to disconnect the battery when he went to correct the wire. BOOM, BOOM! To make matters worse, one of the rear attaching lugs didn't disengage and the pod smashed the trailing edge of the wing. Four rocket pods, 76 rockets and a wing destroyed because of one little mistake.

The Aviation gods are not forgiving, even on the ground.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3a/Ah1sinst_Cockpit.jpg