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View Full Version : 25 Astounding Moon Landing Facts From 'First Man' That Are Actually True



sharpiefan
10-14-2018, 08:55 AM
An estimated 530 million people around the world had their eyes on NASA astronaut Neil Armstrong as he took one "giant leap for mankind" on July 20, 1969.
Armstrong cemented his role in history that day, becoming the first person to step foot on the Moon. Today, walking on the lunar surface is an honour only 11 other men share.
But the backstory of how Armstrong was selected for that job and his tumultuous path to the Moon are less well known.
In the movie First Man, actor Ryan Gosling plays a young Armstrong in the ambitious and sometimes tragic lead-up to his unlikely journey to the Moon.
The film is based on the non-fiction book First Man, which was published by Armstrong's official biographer James Hansen 13 years ago.
Nearly everything chronicled in the film is true (aside from the Hollywood makeup, perhaps), including Armstrong's near-death experience training to fly the Moon lander and the death of a good friend who was chosen for the first Apollo mission.

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25 Astounding Moon Landing Facts From 'First Man' That Are Actually True (LINK) (https://www.sciencealert.com/22-astounding-moon-landing-facts-from-first-man-that-are-actually-true)


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ron ll
10-14-2018, 10:07 AM
I’m currently reading “Rocketmen” by Robert Kurson. It’s about Apollo 8, which was a very rushed mission in December 1968 to beat the Russians to be first to orbit the moon. It was the first time there were humans on top of a Saturn V but carried no lunar landing module because it wasn’t ready yet. Really amazing the balls those people, and this country, had at that time. The things they did to rush that mission to win the race should have scared the crap out of them.

earling2
10-14-2018, 01:45 PM
I don't know if astronauts are engineers now, but they were then. My favorite thing in these movies is how they extricate themselves from life-or-death situations with notebook, pencil and slide rules. Astronauts were adrenaline junkies, extreme athletes, and scientists all rolled into one. Rare people. I wonder if the real Neil Armstrong was as tightly wound and grief-stricken as Ryan Gosling was--this flic is a far cry from Kevin Bacon, Forrest Gump, and Bill Paxton's group hug

Joe (SoCal)
10-14-2018, 02:18 PM
I don't know if astronauts are engineers now, but they were then. My favorite thing in these movies is how they extricate themselves from life-or-death situations with notebook, pencil and slide rules. Astronauts were adrenaline junkies, extreme athletes, and scientists all rolled into one. Rare people. I wonder if the real Neil Armstrong was as tightly wound and grief-stricken as Ryan Gosling was--this flic is a far cry from Kevin Bacon, Forrest Gump, and Bill Paxton's group hug

I always felt that this is why the Shackleton expedition succeeded the crew was not just rank sailors but scientists, adrenaline junkies and extreme athletes all rolled into one.

bluedog225
10-14-2018, 04:19 PM
I've read Shackleton's boom several times. I wonder if the others ever published an account?

Dannybb55
10-14-2018, 06:45 PM
Some deeds are worth the risk, like crossing oceans to settle New countries, an equal technical achievement. The shame is, we never went back. The moon base and settlement is long overdue and will probably never happen.

Garret
10-14-2018, 06:51 PM
Armstrong gave a talk at my school in 1970 or early 1971. He had us all spellbound for about an hour and a half - great stories told in a matter-of-fact manner & a dry sense of humor. He gave credit to people all over the place - from fellow astronauts to ground crew, to just about the janitors.

All of the astronauts were very special people I think. I just wish we hadn't tossed away the space program the way we did.

paulf
10-14-2018, 06:55 PM
Some deeds are worth the risk, like crossing oceans to settle New countries, an equal technical achievement. The shame is, we never went back. The moon base and settlement is long overdue and will probably never happen.

Sure it will, but it will be done by the Chinese. All reference to American exploration will be erased.

Iceboy
10-15-2018, 07:58 AM
Of the 28 men on the Endurance only 9 were not " rank sailors". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endurance_(1912_ship)


I always felt that this is why the Shackleton expedition succeeded the crew was not just rank sailors but scientists, adrenaline junkies and extreme athletes all rolled into one.

Iceboy
10-15-2018, 08:02 AM
Frank Worsley also wrote of the voyage.


I've read Shackleton's boom several times. I wonder if the others ever published an account?

Rum_Pirate
10-15-2018, 09:49 AM
“Good luck, Mr. Gorsky.”



* Alas this is an urban myth.

cs
10-15-2018, 09:55 AM
I was surprised to learn the other day that when he landed on the moon that Chuck Norris was there to show him where to park.

Chad

sharpiefan
10-15-2018, 10:05 AM
“Good luck, Mr. Gorsky.”



* Alas this is an urban myth.


:D Y>

earling2
10-17-2018, 07:51 PM
I loved Worsley's book, more graphic, a little less Victorian grandiloquence in it than Shakelton's, more specifics about gear and conditions. Shakelton's was a great read, but you don't get quite the same level of detail.
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