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sleek
10-04-2018, 10:43 AM
After hurricane Florence there are a few boats stricken in marsh that I wouldnt mind owning out here in North Carolina. I reckon if they have been there that long, maybe they are open for whoever has means to get them? How do salvage rigjts work?

Ian McColgin
10-04-2018, 03:03 PM
You're not finding it on the high seas so there really are no "salvage rights".

If it's an unregistered boat that's been out there a while with no hope of finding the owner, probably no harm in taking her.

If registered, or documented, track down the owner. If the owner won't give her away, volunteer to call whatever harbormaster or river police has jurisdiction to facilitate their getting hold of the owner to determine cost of abandoning a vessel.

You need to go through the steps to register or document the boat for yourself.

bluedog225
10-04-2018, 03:06 PM
Getting it out sounds like fun. Good winter project.

Ted Hoppe
10-04-2018, 03:25 PM
Now if you go "rescue" them if they are off the moorage or dock and drifted into the marsh... you can still claim recovery and holding fees. Boats that are illegally beached in the marsh and suffer tidal action do not fare well. Most people do not have the resources or insurance for their own boat recovery. Those fees could encourage the boat owner to sign the boat over to you.

I suspect if you told boat owners you could recover their boat for a nominal fee, they would rather pay or tell you to keep the boat than deal with the fines the state mostly likely will levy against them for polluting the shoreline.

sleek
10-04-2018, 06:21 PM
I contacted the wildlife commision. They said to get the vessels hull numbers, give it to them, and they would track down the registered owner, and give me the address. I then mail off a certified letter to let the owner know they have 30 days or its mine. Pretty simple.

I dont know about fines etc, and how that works from boats wrecked from natural disasters.

Im also not certain how to get it. Its about 100 yards into a marsh layin on its side with no land access and out of tides reach. Im guessing digging a trench at low tides by hand to flood around it when high tide hits. Then maybe a bow wench and anchor to drag it forward if possible? Its a large glass boat with fly bridge, looks to be a nice offshore fishing boat. I need to kayak to get to it and check out the hull. I can deal with damage, to it, but hopefully its not a total loss. I also need to wory about regulations on destroying marsh lands and such.

What would a rough estimate on a nominal fee be for a task like this?

Ted Hoppe
10-04-2018, 06:36 PM
I contacted the wildlife commision. They said to get the vessels hull numbers, give it to them, and they would track down the registered owner, and give me the address. I then mail off a certified letter to let the owner know they have 30 days or its mine. Pretty simple.

I dont know about fines etc, and how that works from boats wrecked from natural disasters.

Im also not certain how to get it. Its about 100 yards into a marsh layin on its side with no land access and out of tides reach. Im guessing digging a trench at low tides by hand to flood around it when high tide hits. Then maybe a bow wench and anchor to drag it forward if possible? Its a large glass boat with fly bridge, looks to be a nice offshore fishing boat. I need to kayak to get to it and check out the hull. I can deal with damage, to it, but hopefully its not a total loss. I also need to wory about regulations on destroying marsh lands and such.

What would a rough estimate on a nominal fee be for a task like this?

the fee is quite subjective. That sounds like a pretty big job. You will need to do it soon. Looters are well aware of the boat. They will strip it as soon as they can. Every day it sits there, more things will happen to the boat. There will be a short time that the boat will not have any value and likely some thugs will hole it permanently and it will desolve into the marsh over next decade.

A dug channel, a jack, laid out cardboard and a powerful towing boat with a very long line could very well do it. As reference Pulling a 25’ boat off a mud flats runs about 1800 dollars for the hour here. Even in NC - 10,000 plus for a boat recover would not be an unreasonable fee - insurance companies might even cover that - individuals most likely not. Any way anybody looks at it, the boat like that needs to moved to be saved and most who don’t have the means will lose it.

Jim Bow
10-04-2018, 06:43 PM
Up here in the PNW, I believe that a suspected abandoned boat can be taken, then reported to licensing. You request title. Licensing will attempt to contact the last registered owner for several months. If there's no response, it can be registered to you.
The "take it home" part can be iffy, but if it's on private property, the land owner can grant permission.

sleek
10-04-2018, 06:48 PM
Sounds like i need to hurry up then. 10k for a fee? Id dig a trench for that much no question! And I know some guys who have a few boats that may help... time to get busy. Seems this is the best route.

Ted Hoppe
10-04-2018, 06:54 PM
Up here in the PNW, I believe that a suspected abandoned boat can be taken, then reported to licensing. You request title. Licensing will attempt to contact the last registered owner for several months. If there's no response, it can be registered to you.
The "take it home" part can be iffy, but if it's on private property, the land owner can grant permission.

that sounds right. Also the shoreline on any navagatble water where the highwater mark hits is free public access. You don’t need permission to be there although it is good to have witnesses and to be willling be socially responsible and be willing to call law enforcement if conflict arises.

plan to pull the boat out on a rising tide. It will give your tow boat more access.

Ian McColgin
10-04-2018, 08:05 PM
After Hurricane Bob, I helped organize a group who hired a Skycrane but you'll not want to do that for just one boat. I also had a friend who could not afford to go in on the Skycrane. His 2 ton sloop was about 100 yards up the march. We planted three massive anchors in series well out in good water and, using a combination of planks, plywood, and cardboard to keep her from digging into the mud or damaging the march too harshly, we skidded her out over about three hard days.

It's hard to find usefully large inflatable rollers for a one-off job on a boat this size, if I'm guessing right as to what you're looking at. It's possible that log rollers on a bunch of planks might help.

There can be very serious environmental issues if you start digging your own canal.

Fun project for "Egyptian technology".

leikec
10-04-2018, 08:55 PM
It's always lovely to profit off of other people's misery...

Not.

Jeff C

Breakaway
10-04-2018, 10:43 PM
In big storms with a lot of surge boats end up in strange places. Even if inured for full value, the cost of retrieving a boat that might need a crane for extraction can cost more than the boat is worth ( or a big percentage of its value).


Kevin

skuthorp
10-04-2018, 11:03 PM
The Vikings used log rollers a lot to move their boats over small isthmus and save a long sea voyage. And supposedly did the same to bring a boat overland to the headwaters of the Danube.

Breakaway
10-04-2018, 11:24 PM
The Vikings used log rollers a lot to move their boats over small isthmus and save a long sea voyage. And supposedly did the same to bring a boat overland to the headwaters of the Danube.





The Vikings didnt have to worry about crossing private property, environmental regs or anything else.

Kevin

sleek
10-05-2018, 06:43 AM
It's always lovely to profit off of other people's misery...

Not.

Jeff C

How is this proffiting off others misery? He doesnt get his boat, its free to whoever, not to mention environmental impact that encourages boat removal. Aside from that, he either has insurance or doesnt. Not my responsibility. I really just want the boat, and will follow the law to get it.

sleek
10-05-2018, 06:44 AM
The Vikings didnt have to worry about crossing private property, environmental regs or anything else.

Kevin

Yeah, as an outdoorsman, i really dont want to damage ecosystems. I want to leave as small an impact as possible.

sleek
10-05-2018, 06:45 AM
The Vikings used log rollers a lot to move their boats over small isthmus and save a long sea voyage. And supposedly did the same to bring a boat overland to the headwaters of the Danube.

Im not certain logs would work in this case. Im probably gonna get ply and 2x4 to slide across

sleek
10-05-2018, 06:47 AM
After Hurricane Bob, I helped organize a group who hired a Skycrane but you'll not want to do that for just one boat. I also had a friend who could not afford to go in on the Skycrane. His 2 ton sloop was about 100 yards up the march. We planted three massive anchors in series well out in good water and, using a combination of planks, plywood, and cardboard to keep her from digging into the mud or damaging the march too harshly, we skidded her out over about three hard days.

It's hard to find usefully large inflatable rollers for a one-off job on a boat this size, if I'm guessing right as to what you're looking at. It's possible that log rollers on a bunch of planks might help.

There can be very serious environmental issues if you start digging your own canal.

Fun project for "Egyptian technology".

I was wondering about an inflatable jack type thing to lift and slide it forward. Being in marsh sure complicates things.