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View Full Version : Ten Life Truths as Taught by the 8n Ford Tracotr



cs
10-02-2018, 06:43 AM
I had posted this on FB a few months back and not sure if I shared it here. So here it goes. These are the truths of life as taught to me by the 8N Ford. These truths are based on my personal experiences.




If you like your thumbs as they are, donít wrap them around the steering wheel
Everything has the proper gear
Sometimes you have to feather the clutch to keep your nose on the ground
Hot seats can burn your ass
Not flipping the seat up can cause a wet ass in the morning
At times you have to use the steering brakes to help turn
Cold mornings may require something extra to get you started
Sometimes briar bushes are best attacked at the edges rather than head on
At times you will want to remove the bush hog drive shaft to engage your PTO
Last but not least, slow and steady may win the race but if you got a long way to go trailer the tractor



And there you go.

Chad

Ian McColgin
10-02-2018, 06:56 AM
Dad enthusiastically maintained bridal paths all over the hunt country and had many misadventures with his tractor and bush hog. And he had an amazing way to laugh his way through pain.

Like the time we were out back of beyond and Dad decided that a limb above a jump we had just rebuilt was too low for safety. So I backed the tractor under where Dad could stand on the rear wheel fender to get a bow saw on the limb. I was snickering a bit because he was supporting himself with his left hand and sawing away on the limb. The tree was further to the right.

Dad saw my look and, continuing to saw, told me how he was aware and that as the limb began to go he'd shift just fine and . . . the branch suddenly gave way and Dad fell on the bush hog cracking a rib. The ride home was horrible for him partly from the bumpy ride but more because of the sharp pain every time he began to laugh at himself.

bluedog225
10-02-2018, 07:12 AM
I spent countless hours riding around on the 8n with dad. One foot on the axle, leaning against the fender. I also learned to drive a stranded on the 8n. I was tempted to buy one but have to admit, they are surprisingly dangerous. Esp when used as an ATV back in the day.

Garret
10-02-2018, 09:08 AM
An adventure I had with the 2N I learned to drive on was great "fun". As many know, the 2N, 9N & 8N are much the same, but none have live PTO. I mounted a bush hog onto it as I had some jobs mowing fields & some were too rough/brushy for the sickle bar mower.

I fired up the tractor, engaged the PTO & happily started mowing. Got close to a fence & depressed the clutch pedal & brakes to stop. Well - doing that does not disengage the PTO on these tractors & does anyone have any idea just how good a flywheel a 4' brush hog is? The tractor kept right on going through the fence & for another 20'.

After fixing the fence, I went down to the farm supply & bought an overrunning clutch for it. Much safer...

I have a modern 4WD diesel tractor now & love how much work it'll do, but I miss the nimbleness of the 2N - it was like a sports car compared to this one. :)

Oh - one other thing. The wiring harness was old & tired. I went to Tractor supply (this is about 15-20 years ago) & bought a complete harness: all the right lengths, wire sizes & nicely covered in woven cloth. $8.95 + a new ignition switch for $4.95. I had to replace the ignition switch on my modern tractor last year & it was $65...

amish rob
10-02-2018, 09:11 AM
Man, Iíd love a small tractor. I could get a lot of use from one. Especially with a wee bucket.

One day.

One day. :)

Peace,
Robert

Tom Montgomery
10-02-2018, 09:42 AM
Ah memories...

My grandfather's tractor:

https://antiquetractorblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/ferguson-to-20.jpg

One of my cousins now owns and operates the tractor.

LeeG
10-02-2018, 09:48 AM
I tried cutting down too much tall broom sedge with an 8n that was full of whispy white flowers, had to stop every 100yds to unpack the radiator. It now sits alone.

George Jung
10-02-2018, 10:25 AM
Never had a Ford - but we did have an IH Super M that was a workhorse. I did a lot of field work with that, plus loading/unloading silage for the cattle. I miss that tractor - but hard to 'store' living in town!

CWSmith
10-02-2018, 10:29 AM
I learned one valuable lesson on the old Gravely mower with the sulky pulled behind: Never turn while starting up a hill. Either you know what I'm talking about or you don't...

cs
10-02-2018, 10:35 AM
Reason: btw... those 'truths' apply to the M, as well!

George I think those are universal life truths. In my case they were just taught to me by the 8N. I imagine other tractors inducing IH or Massey Ferguson could teach the same thing. Same truths, different teachers I guess. LOL

Chad

Garret
10-02-2018, 10:39 AM
I learned one valuable lesson on the old Gravely mower with the sulky pulled behind: Never turn while starting up a hill. Either you know what I'm talking about or you don't...

Oh boy do I know that one.

Katherine
10-02-2018, 10:41 AM
I'm not allowed to use the brush hog anymore, had a few to many "incidents."

Garret
10-02-2018, 10:41 AM
At times you will want to remove the bush hog drive shaft to engage your PTO


Chad

So - how do you reattach the driveshaft when the PTO is turning? Enquiring minds...

George Jung
10-02-2018, 10:43 AM
Quickly. Very, very.

bluedog225
10-02-2018, 10:46 AM
I'd forgotten the uncovered drive shaft for the mower. The safety training was-don't touch that.

George Jung
10-02-2018, 10:48 AM
PTOs/shafts are one of the nastier, fairly frequent causes of mortality/morbidity for farmers. Kinda like getting 'too comfortable' around shop tools; they tend to bite.

amish rob
10-02-2018, 11:00 AM
Never had a Ford - but we did have an IH Super M that was a workhorse. I did a lot of field work with that, plus loading/unloading silage for the cattle. I miss that tractor - but hard to 'store' living in town!

Always worked IH tractors, too.

Peace,
Robert

CWSmith
10-02-2018, 11:20 AM
Oh boy do I know that one.

What bothers me most is that I had to learn it several times. :)

paulf
10-02-2018, 11:35 AM
I rebuilt a Ford 8N.
Liquid filled tires, Sherman trans, Wagner front end loader and steering clutch to protect my fingers.

50 psi oil pressure at start and smokes just a little as I didn't do the rings.

I don't know how I could have 10 acres without it! $3,000, with another $1,000 in repairs. It was born 2 months after me, according to the casting dates August 1950 8 N.

Ron Williamson
10-02-2018, 11:37 AM
So - how do you reattach the driveshaft when the PTO is turning? Enquiring minds...
Sooooo, if you stall the tractor by driving the bush hog over a dirt pile,that is only way to lift the 3 point hitch without the blades turning.
BTW, the dirt pile driving is also a consequence of not having an over running clutch.

Adding misery to mayhem,
R

Dumah
10-02-2018, 02:20 PM
Learned all those lessons on first a '56 MH Pacer, then graduated to a '68 David Brown 770A. Just loved that old Brown.

Dumah

Nicholas Scheuer
10-02-2018, 02:29 PM
Dad never liked them. Said the low-hanging exhaust might light a grain field afire. He much prefered Farmal or Case, or any tractor with a vertical exhaust. He lost the log cabin he was born in due to a field fire started by a passing Grand Trunk RR locomotive.

cs
10-02-2018, 03:23 PM
So - how do you reattach the driveshaft when the PTO is turning? Enquiring minds...

This was one of those I learned while driving the tractor and bush hog from Dad's place to my Uncle's place, kinda goes in hand with my last point (Last but not least, slow and steady may win the race but if you got a long way to go trailer the tractor). In order to keep the bush hog in the air without the blades spinning you had to take off the drive shaft.

The first time I did this I would engage the PTO lift the hog and then turn the PTO off. After a bit the hydraulics leaked down enough to where I would have to re-engage and lift back up. After that I learned to leave the driveshaft off for longer runs like that, which leads into the trailer thing.

Chad

oznabrag
10-02-2018, 03:35 PM
About half of these rules can be summed up by Oznabrag's First Dictum:
Don't tempt Fate. She's already pissed.

:D

Chad, I want you to know that you are among the top tier of reasons why I come here.

Salute!

cs
10-02-2018, 03:41 PM
Careful you might make my head swell and I can't afford more hats, and besides the wife said I can't buy anymore hats. :)

Chad

oznabrag
10-02-2018, 03:51 PM
Ha! :d

Garret
10-02-2018, 04:01 PM
What bothers me most is that I had to learn it several times. :)

The same way I learn every few months that it's easier to get out of the car after you undo the seatbelt?

Garret
10-02-2018, 04:02 PM
Sooooo, if you stall the tractor by driving the bush hog over a dirt pile,that is only way to lift the 3 point hitch without the blades turning.
BTW, the dirt pile driving is also a consequence of not having an over running clutch.

Adding misery to mayhem,
R

That I get as I do driving down the road with leaky hydraulics. And here I thought that's what the comealong was for... The sicklebar mower is nice 'cause that can be held up with an old piece of rope.

Ted Hoppe
10-02-2018, 04:09 PM
Hayseeds. :)

Rich Jones
10-02-2018, 04:13 PM
Ah memories...

My grandfather's tractor:

https://antiquetractorblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/ferguson-to-20.jpg

One of my cousins now owns and operates the tractor. I found one of these just down the road in a half collapsed shed. My BIL ( a farmer who collects old tractors) bought it for a few hundred and fixed it up to look just like the one you posted.
Tractors can be deadly, though. 60 years ago, one of his brothers somehow flipped a tractor and was crushed to death underneath it.

Vince Brennan
10-02-2018, 04:36 PM
Dunno what sort of tractor did in Eddy Watson but I think it might'a been a Ford.

Garret
10-02-2018, 05:08 PM
Any tractor (but particularly rowcrop) can roll easily on a hill. Situational awareness is crucial.

Tom from Rubicon
10-02-2018, 07:15 PM
Suspect the same holds true for my 1953 Jubilee. More horsepower and live PTO too.