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Tom Wilkinson
09-28-2018, 07:30 AM
Oops.

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/sep/28/air-niugini-plane-overshoots-runway-micronesia-and-lands-in-ocean

Tom Wilkinson
09-28-2018, 07:32 AM
https://youtu.be/eswuZlA6ATo

willmarsh3
09-28-2018, 08:51 AM
Glad no one got killed.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-28-2018, 09:21 AM
Air Nuigini, so the pilot is likely to be an Aussie. If you are going to put a plane in the drink, that's a nice way to do it.

John of Phoenix
09-28-2018, 09:33 AM
"I thought, 'This is not the way itís supposed to happen.í "

Good job by the local "rescue squad".

Phil Y
09-28-2018, 04:34 PM
Air Nuigini, so the pilot is likely to be an Aussie. If you are going to put a plane in the drink, that's a nice way to do it.

Or Air Agony as we call it.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-28-2018, 05:02 PM
Or Air Agony as we call it.

Most airlines’ safety information card:

”In the unlikely event of an accident...”

Air Niugini’s safety information card:

”Supos bulwas im buggerup...”

The Bigfella
09-28-2018, 06:12 PM
That was their newest plane too, from 2005. They have one from 2001... and the rest are somewhat ancient.

Last time I flew with them, we landed somewhere on a multi-stop flight and they couldn't get the door open for about five minutes, until the pilot came back and put his shoulder into it. Didn't make me feel too good about the next few hops.

As to the nationality of the pilot - I seem to recall that the pilot who dropped that early series Airbus into the forest in France, killing IIRC 3, ended up flying for them. They aren't known for picking the cream of the crop

CK 17
09-28-2018, 06:43 PM
.
As to the nationality of the pilot - I seem to recall that the pilot who dropped that early series Airbus into the forest in France, killing IIRC 3, ended up flying for them. They aren't known for picking the cream of the crop



well to be devils advocate, the airbus was really new when that accident occurred. He probably had very little experience at the time. As I recall, the 320 was the first aircraft With that level of automation.

6013 feet seems like a short runway at the end of a very long flight. A challenging operation I would think.

The Bigfella
09-28-2018, 06:58 PM
well to be devils advocate, the airbus was really new when that accident occurred. He probably had very little experience at the time. As I recall, the 320 was the first aircraft With that level of automation.

6013 feet seems like a short runway at the end of a very long flight. A challenging operation I would think.

Hard to understand performing maneuvers like that without simulator trials. Reminds me of the RAAF 707 that the pilot dropped into the sea, whilst performing a double asymmetrical engine-out. Something that had never occurred in operations and could have been performed on a simulator. An Air Force mate was played the cockpit tape as part of his training. Co-pilot's last words.... "you've f...ing killed us".

john welsford
09-29-2018, 12:17 AM
well to be devils advocate, the airbus was really new when that accident occurred. He probably had very little experience at the time. As I recall, the 320 was the first aircraft With that level of automation.

6013 feet seems like a short runway at the end of a very long flight. A challenging operation I would think.

I was speaking this morning to someone who knows that airport very well, and had spoken to a friend of his who was aboard when that plane crashed. It seems that it was raining, poor visibility, and the passengers impression is that the plane landed too far down the runway and by the time the pilot realised that, it was too late to throttle up and go around again so, off the end of that short runway and belly flopped her into the drink.
There is a New Zealand salvage crew on their way up there as of this am, hoping to get the aircraft out onto dry land for assessment.

John Welsford

NickW
09-29-2018, 02:02 PM
I was speaking this morning to someone who knows that airport very well, and had spoken to a friend of his who was aboard when that plane crashed. It seems that it was raining, poor visibility, and the passengers impression is that the plane landed too far down the runway and by the time the pilot realised that, it was too late to throttle up and go around again so, off the end of that short runway and belly flopped her into the drink.
There is a New Zealand salvage crew on their way up there as of this am, hoping to get the aircraft out onto dry land for assessment.

John Welsford

With a few cans of WD40 to displace the water are they aiming to fly it home?

Nick

WI-Tom
09-29-2018, 03:40 PM
On my travels between the Marshall Islands and the U.S. I now land regularly (as a passenger) on some VERY small islands. A runway miss is all too easy to envision.

Tom

john welsford
09-29-2018, 06:24 PM
With a few cans of WD40 to displace the water are they aiming to fly it home?

Nick

I would imagine that they'll be, first of all, getting it back onto dry land, then assessing whether to prepare it for shipment back to Seattle for repair, or whether to break it up and send it away to a scrapyard. Whichever they do it has to come out of the water as its a hazard which will downrate the airport, and is also a pollution risk.

John Welsford

The Bigfella
09-29-2018, 11:59 PM
I would imagine that they'll be, first of all, getting it back onto dry land, then assessing whether to prepare it for shipment back to Seattle for repair, or whether to break it up and send it away to a scrapyard. Whichever they do it has to come out of the water as its a hazard which will downrate the airport, and is also a pollution risk.

John Welsford

Salt water... wiring. I'm calling it dead.

Tom Wilkinson
09-30-2018, 06:33 AM
Salt water... wiring. I'm calling it dead.

Not to mention in every nook and cranny of that fuselage. The future corrosion issues could be a nightmare. Pretty sure this one will be scrapped.