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sharpiefan
09-25-2018, 01:12 PM
https://www.sciencenews.org/sites/default/files/2018/09/main/articles/092418_ht_funkyfish_feat.jpg
BRIGHT SPOT Tosanoides aphrodite lives 100 to 130 meters below the ocean surface in a rocky, mid-Atlantic reef



A new species of reef fish is a real head turner.

Last year while surveying a remote coral reef about 130 meters below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean, ichthyologists Luiz Rocha and Hudson Pinheiro spotted a radiant fish hiding in a drab rock crevice.

“It was like finding a bright emerald in a coal mine,” recalls Pinheiro.

The fish, with its electric-pink-and-yellow body and bright green fins, was so mesmerizing, “it made us completely ignore a massive [shark] that was hovering over our heads,” Rocha says.


SURPRISE! Despite the exclamations of their fellow diver, Luiz Rocha and Hudson Pinheiro remained oblivious to a sixgill shark, up to 3 meters long, that snuck up on them as they observed a new species of deep-reef fish about the size of a car key (roughly 6 centimeters).

Back in the lab, Claudia Rocha analyzed the fish’s DNA. Those results combined with the observation of a few distinguishing characteristics — a longer spine here, an extra fin ray there — confirmed the fish as a new species, the trio of California Academy of Sciences researchers report September 25 in Zookeys. Due to its hypnotic beauty, they named the fish Tosanoides aphrodite, a nod to the ancient Greek goddess Aphrodite.

T. aphrodite belongs to the same fish group as similarly psychedelic reef inhabitants known as Anthiadinae, but its closest known relatives live over in the Pacific — including a Hawaiian species named in 2016 after President Barack Obama.

The new species turned up in a reef by St. Paul’s Rocks, a series of mid-Atlantic islets about 1,000 kilometers from Brazil. The area’s extreme isolation could help explain why so many of its species aren’t found elsewhere. Still, deep reefs remain understudied habitats, and T. aphrodite or its relatives could be hiding out in other deep Atlantic reefs.


New fish species displays a splash of highlighter hues (LINK) (https://www.sciencenews.org/article/new-fish-species-displays-splash-highlighter-hues)


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CWSmith
09-25-2018, 01:20 PM
The salt water hobby just sat up and took notice! Gorgeous fish!

Ian McColgin
09-25-2018, 01:41 PM
Perfect name. John Steinbeck and his philosophy and biology mentor Ed Ricketts at one point thought they had found a new species that lives in the anus of the sea cucumber and planned to name it Proctophilus winchellii. Turned out to be already known.

For history of science, ecology, and philosophy types, there is much to be gained from finding out about Ed Ricketts.

Old Dryfoot
09-25-2018, 01:50 PM
Very cool. And very familiar. There is another fish that I can't recall that looks remarkable similar. A type of Blenny perhaps?

Old Dryfoot
09-25-2018, 01:52 PM
Nope, not a Blenny. This is going to bug me.

sharpiefan
09-25-2018, 02:09 PM
Nope, not a Blenny. This is going to bug me.

Any of these?

http://wamas.org/forums/topic/28039-tosanoides-flavofasciatus/

Old Dryfoot
09-25-2018, 02:52 PM
I've been out of the hobby for a while now, but I think the fish I'm recalling is a type of Wrasse. I'm sort of hanging off of the side of a building right now though, so I'll need to hit Google once I can use both hands.

sharpiefan
09-25-2018, 03:03 PM
Quick! Do the Tarzan Yell! :D

johnw
09-25-2018, 03:12 PM
I hate buying a used fish and finding that someone has highlighted every scale.

sharpiefan
09-25-2018, 03:21 PM
I hate buying a used fish and finding that someone has highlighted every scale.

Always use Fishfax™. :)

johnw
09-25-2018, 03:24 PM
Always use Fishfax™. :)
;).

David W Pratt
09-25-2018, 03:29 PM
Very interesting that it has such bright colors. How much light is there at 130M?

Old Dryfoot
09-25-2018, 04:11 PM
Quick! Do the Tarzan Yell! :D

Without my loincloth? I couldn't, I'd just feel silly.

Old Dryfoot
09-25-2018, 10:32 PM
I think I've found it, sort of. I was remembering one of a variety of Fairy Wrasse.

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1161/1898/products/12130122944_08cb92b23a_b.jpg?v=1517883884


https://kenyamarinecenter.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Attenuatus-3-Closeup-L.jpg

Barry
09-26-2018, 05:22 AM
Perfect name. John Steinbeck and his philosophy and biology mentor Ed Ricketts at one point thought they had found a new species that lives in the anus of the sea cucumber and planned to name it Proctophilus winchellii. Turned out to be already known.

For history of science, ecology, and philosophy types, there is much to be gained from finding out about Ed Ricketts.

This was a good read and my own introduction to Ed Ricketts (other than "The Log from the Sea of Cortez").

https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1348601998l/401670.jpg

PeterSibley
09-26-2018, 06:20 AM
It surprises me that it is so colourful at that depth, those reds wouldn't be red at that depth to a human eye..... I wonder what species can see them?