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Sky Blue
07-31-2018, 01:58 PM
The DoJ is instituting a religious liberty task force charged with protecting citizens' religious liberty interest under the 1st Amendment. This is great news for those Americans that believe in civil liberties and religious freedom.

Thank you Jeff Sessions!

http://thehill.com/regulation/administration/399482-sessions-announces-religious-liberty-task-force

ron ll
07-31-2018, 02:22 PM
Excellent. Now I will be protected when I shout from the rooftops what I think of all religions.

Ian McColgin
07-31-2018, 02:22 PM
I find it anti-religious freedom at the deepest levels. Sessions' opening crack - "We’ve seen nuns ordered to buy contraceptives." - is a flat lie. He's referring to the Little Sisters of Poor are an order of nuns, celebates all, who minister to the elderly in Little Sisters run nursing homes. No one involved has anything to do with contraceptives. The problem arose because the nuns were directed by radical anti-contraception/anti-ACA men to refuse to even apply for a waiver, for which they were totally eligible. This task force is nothing more than the Sessions/Pence bit of Christian Dominionism.

And I really don't buy his boasting that prosecuting people who attacked a mosque is a courageous support of religious liberty. It was nothing more or less than his department's basic law enforcement job.

mmd
07-31-2018, 02:45 PM
When I first went to college I was required to take an "arts and humanities" course, even though I did not see how it was related to commercial photography. So I opted for a course titled "Great World Religions - Origins, History, and Modern Relevance". I figured that I could use a bit of expansion of my knowledge, even though I am not an adherent of any world (or local) religion. It turned out that the instructor's view of great world religions is that there is only one - Protestant christianity. I guess that the religious liberty being contemplated in Mr. Sessions' bill is like that, too.

Paul Pless
07-31-2018, 03:01 PM
Thank you Jeff Sessions!somedays i wish that a vengeful old school old testament god really existed :D

Norman Bernstein
07-31-2018, 03:18 PM
The DoJ is instituting a religious liberty task force charged with protecting citizens' religious liberty interest under the 1st Amendment. This is great news for those Americans that believe in civil liberties and religious freedom.

Thank you Jeff Sessions!

http://thehill.com/regulation/administration/399482-sessions-announces-religious-liberty-task-force

I'm sure he'll be protecting the religious freedom of Muslims and Sikhs, with the same enthusiasm and fervor, right?

Sky Blue
07-31-2018, 04:00 PM
I'm sure he'll be protecting the religious freedom of Muslims and Sikhs, with the same enthusiasm and fervor, right?

That would be required by law, so yes, I would expect him to.

Art Haberland
07-31-2018, 05:10 PM
That would be required by law, so yes, I would expect him to.

I will not hold my breath...

Norman Bernstein
07-31-2018, 05:11 PM
It all depends on what one thinks 'religious liberty' really means. To Sessions, and especially Pence, it means the freedom to shape public policy in the direction of their own religious beliefs.

skuthorp
07-31-2018, 05:15 PM
When I first went to college I was required to take an "arts and humanities" course, even though I did not see how it was related to commercial photography. So I opted for a course titled "Great World Religions - Origins, History, and Modern Relevance". I figured that I could use a bit of expansion of my knowledge, even though I am not an adherent of any world (or local) religion. It turned out that the instructor's view of great world religions is that there is only one - Protestant christianity. I guess that the religious liberty being contemplated in Mr. Sessions' bill is like that, too.
I did a similar subject, religious arguments (in the abstract, you took a position and argued for it) being standard fare around our family. Same applied, I argued, did my research, got thrown off the course with a fellow conspirator. The lecturer was one of the most ignorant men I have ever come across.

paulf
07-31-2018, 05:20 PM
It all depends on what one thinks 'religious liberty' really means. To Sessions, and especially Pence, it means the freedom to shape public policy in the direction of their own religious beliefs.

Scathing article in the paper this morning on Pence, But here is a quote from Sessions:

He Allegedly "Used To Think That [The KKK] Were OK" Until He Learned That Some Of The Members Were "Pot Smokers"
https://www.bustle.com/articles/195887-9-terrible-jeff-sessions-quotes-about-everything-from-donald-trump-to-the-kkk

Norman Bernstein
07-31-2018, 05:24 PM
I saw a recent article about Pence which makes me wonder if dumping Trump might be like jumping from the frying pan, into the fire.... he's an extreme religious zealot.

Art Haberland
07-31-2018, 05:27 PM
I saw a recent article about Pence which makes me wonder if dumping Trump might be like jumping from the frying pan, into the fire.... he's an extreme religious zealot.

He is, but as proven, he does not have an original thought in his head. I am not sure what he would do, but I am certain it would not be as embarrassing on the world stage as The Donald is.

James McMullen
07-31-2018, 05:55 PM
That would be required by law, so yes, I would expect him to.

Ha ha ha! It’s been obvious for a while you’re both disagreeable and hyper-partisan, but it’s hilarious to see how little attention you’ve been paying to what’s actually been going on. Expect the Trump administration to follow the law just because it’s the right thing to do? Are the walls of your bubble really that thick? Unreal!

Canoez
07-31-2018, 06:03 PM
Just looks like a yuuuuuge violation of the separation of Church and State to me.

skuthorp
07-31-2018, 06:06 PM
The RW are attempting a similar process here. A report was commissioned about 'protecting religious (read christian) freedom but the Gov't obviously did not like the result as it has not been released.

Ian McColgin
07-31-2018, 07:55 PM
Despite Sessions' disingenuous boasting about prosecuting vandals of mosques, a simple read of Sessions' charge to the 'task force' shows that it's not even a little about law enforcement, which is already clearly mandated. It's about deference to the peccadilloes of right wing fundies like himself and Pence. Especially on matters where older white guys get to control women's private and personal choices.

adampet
07-31-2018, 08:07 PM
https://scontent.fbos1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/38122622_10216551822498601_8983396524511723520_n.j pg?_nc_cat=0&oh=3ddfd7969c933c275cd056102fc9e803&oe=5BD552D2

BrianY
07-31-2018, 08:40 PM
That's terrific. Finally my Satanic coven can hold services in public and the cops and the legal system will protect us. I can't wait until the first goat sacrifice!

Chip-skiff
07-31-2018, 08:52 PM
That's terrific. Finally my Satanic coven can hold services in public and the cops and the legal system will protect us. I can't wait until the first goat sacrifice!

Start with a black chicken and work your way up.

I just thought of what to call “conservative” thinking in the age of Trump: Selective Idiocy.

They can keep track of their money, but when it comes to politics, no hope.

Osborne Russell
07-31-2018, 09:01 PM
Git 'em, Beauregard. And know that the state-n-locals are doing their bit to protect the chicken-killing:


In 1993, the issue of animal sacrifice in Santería was taken to the Supreme Court of the United States in the case of Church of the Lukumi Babalu Aye v. City of Hialeah. The court ruled that animal cruelty laws targeted specifically at Santería were unconstitutional.

In 2009, legal and religious issues that related to animal sacrifice, animal rights, and freedom of religion were taken to the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in the case of Jose Merced, President Templo Yoruba Omo Orisha Texas, Inc., v. City of Euless. The court ruled that the Merced case of the freedom of exercise of religion was meritorious and prevailing and that Merced was entitled under the Texas Religious Freedom and Restoration Act (TRFRA) to an injunction preventing the city of Euless, Texas, from enforcing its ordinances restricting his religious practices relating to the use of animals, (see Tex. Civ. Prac. & Rem. Code § 110.005(a)(2)) without the court having to reach his claims under the First and Fourteenth Amendments. After the court case was settled, a news article was published in the Dallas Observer documenting the volume and brutality of the animal sacrifices

-- wikipedia, Santeria

And let us NOT forget polygamy. "Not mere freedom to believe, but freedom to act on belief."

Ian McColgin
07-31-2018, 09:12 PM
I favor relaxing laws against eschatological snake handling. At least with those rituals, if God does not intervene, the right guy dies.

BrianY
07-31-2018, 09:44 PM
Will Rastafarians be able to legally smoke pot? It is a religious sacrament...

L.A Marche
07-31-2018, 10:23 PM
Will there be church police, an inquisition, the rack?

Jim Bow
07-31-2018, 10:52 PM
Will they have uniforms?

Black windbreaker with RLTF on the back.

Art Haberland
07-31-2018, 11:22 PM
Will there be church police, an inquisition, the rack?

NOBODY expects the inquisition!

skuthorp
08-01-2018, 01:54 AM
Hmmmmmm

"In 1993, the issue of animal sacrifice in Santería was taken to the Supreme Court of the United States in the case of Church of the Lukumi Babalu Aye v. City of Hialeah. The court ruled that animal cruelty laws targeted specifically at Santería were unconstitutional.

In 2009, legal and religious issues that related to animal sacrifice, animal rights, and freedom of religion were taken to the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in the case of Jose Merced, President Templo Yoruba Omo Orisha Texas, Inc., v. City of Euless. The court ruled that the Merced case of the freedom of exercise of religion was meritorious and prevailing and that Merced was entitled under the Texas Religious Freedom and Restoration Act (TRFRA) to an injunction preventing the city of Euless, Texas, from enforcing its ordinances restricting his religious practices relating to the use of animals, (see Tex. Civ. Prac. & Rem. Code § 110.005(a)(2)) without the court having to reach his claims under the First and Fourteenth Amendments. After the court case was settled, a news article was published in the Dallas Observer documenting the volume and brutality of the animal sacrifices"

Would the same dispensation apply to human sacrifice?:rolleyes: