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sharpiefan
06-22-2018, 10:01 PM
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1806/M16Ir_HubbleRomero_960.jpg

Image: Pillars of the Eagle Nebula in Infrared
Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, HLA;
Processing: Lluís Romero

Explanation:
Newborn stars are forming in the Eagle Nebula. Gravitationally contracting in pillars of dense gas and dust, the intense radiation of these newly-formed bright stars is causing surrounding material to boil away. This image, taken with the Hubble Space Telescope in near infrared light, allows the viewer to see through much of the thick dust that makes the pillars opaque in visible light. The giant structures are light years in length and dubbed informally the Pillars of Creation. Associated with the open star cluster M16, the Eagle Nebula lies about 6,500 light years away. The Eagle Nebula is an easy target for small telescopes in a nebula-rich part of the sky toward the split constellation Serpens Cauda (the tail of the snake).

Jimmy W
06-22-2018, 10:04 PM
Welcome back sharpiefan.

oznabrag
06-22-2018, 10:04 PM
Hey, buddy!

Good to see you!

Old Dryfoot
06-22-2018, 10:10 PM
The Pillars of Creation was simply the most amazing DSO of them all. They don't exist anymore.

Tom Lathrop
06-23-2018, 07:56 AM
Always a treat Sharpie. Just looking at images like this make me glad to have paid taxes to build and support the Hubble.

Do you have any idea of what the size of our solar system might look like in this image?

CWSmith
06-23-2018, 08:07 AM
Welcome back! And that is a great image.

sharpiefan
06-23-2018, 08:48 AM
Thanks, folks; sorry about the unplanned hiatus. The ghost in my 6-year-old phone shuffled off its mortal coil without warning. I finally found funds enough and a program that sounds pretty good.

"Do you have any idea of what the size of our solar system might look like in this image?"

Miniscule. In "Burnham's Celestial Handbook", *highly recommended*, Robert Burnham describes the scale of our 100,000-light year-across galaxy:

Take a side-view photo of the Milky Way galaxy, expand it to cover all of North America -- the pinprick-sized stars outside the core will be separated by an average of 183 metres (600 feet), our solar system about 50 mm (2 in) diameter, and the microscopic Earth separated from the Sun by about 0.85 mm (.033 in).

"The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" doesn't begin to do it justice. :)
https://img.purch.com/w/660/aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zcGFjZS5jb20vaW1hZ2VzL2kvMDAwLzAyNy 82OTQvb3JpZ2luYWwvbS03NC1zcGlyYWwtZ2FsYXh5LmpwZw==

Tom Lathrop
06-23-2018, 04:46 PM
You spiked my interest Sharpie, so I decided to work it out. The image of the serpent's head shows a bit less than 10 inches length (one light year) on my screen so the diameter of our solar system (using the average distance of pluto from the sun) comes to about 12 thousandths of a inch on the same photo. Pretty inconspicuous but not impossible to see. Obviously could not actually see any of the planets of the sun at that scale though. If we include the ort cloud or the latest estimate of extent of our solar system, the little spot gets much bigger. The size of these gas and dust formations is mind boggling and the time taken to form them is even more boggling to contemplate.

sharpiefan
06-23-2018, 09:46 PM
Nicely done. What an amazing time and place we live in!

I was catching up on the APODs I've missed the last few weeks, and serendipitously found this.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GoW8Tf7hTGA

Old Dryfoot
06-23-2018, 10:00 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JqZ2xtsJRGc

WX
06-24-2018, 12:05 AM
Welcome back I was thinking the other day that I hadn’t seem any posts from you for a while.

sharpiefan
06-24-2018, 10:05 AM
Great find, O.D., thanks!

Thanks, WX, it's good to be back. I'm still trying to reassemble my toolkit, so I'll be a bit slow for a while; the basics included on a new, bare-nekked phone are frustratingly limited.

SKIP KILPATRICK
06-24-2018, 10:13 AM
I'm so happy you've returned!

This place is always better with your posts!

Old Dryfoot
06-24-2018, 10:13 AM
Great find, O.D., thanks!

Thanks, WX, it's good to be back. I'm still trying to reassemble my toolkit, so I'll be a bit slow for a while; the basics included on a new, bare-nekked phone are frustratingly limited.

The entire "Hubble's Universe Unfiltered" series is well worth the time.

Nice to see you posting again.