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L.W. Baxter
04-10-2018, 08:43 PM
From riding a motorcycle 100 miles on easy roads.

Went for a brilliant ride yesterday into our coast range to the Upper Nestucca.

24 hours later my hands and feet are still tingly...My '72 Honda vibrates a bit, as advertised.

Could have gone for another ride today, mowed lawn instead. Hmmm.

I've been scheming a mc tour of Oregon river drainages and mountain ranges on this bike. Could take a while riding 50 miles a day. Not that there's anything wrong with that...

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Paul Pless
04-10-2018, 08:48 PM
Could have gone for another ride today, mowed lawn instead.i think i see the problem

Three Cedars
04-10-2018, 08:52 PM
Every bike and body is different , road conditions. It's best to get off the bike and walk around often . That can be every 10 mins sometimes . Looks like a beautiful road to ride on :)

Keith Wilson
04-10-2018, 08:54 PM
My '72 Honda vibrates a bit, as advertised.A bit? I had one, remember.That thing would shake the proverbial balls off a brass monkey. OTOH, I was in my early '20s, so I recovered quickly.

john welsford
04-10-2018, 09:10 PM
Thick socks, and lightly padded handgrips might be helpful. Mind you, where you are, you may only be able to get sox, and they're not nearly as effective as the real thing.

John Welsford

TomF
04-10-2018, 09:12 PM
A bit? I had one, remember.That thing would shake the proverbial balls off a brass monkey. OTOH, I was in my early '20s, so I recovered quickly.

Brass being less resilient than virile young mammals. :D.

My '79 Yamaha shook something fierce too.

Jim Bow
04-10-2018, 09:13 PM
I had aftermarket gel grips on my old Kawa. Around $20 a pair, worked wonders.

PeterSibley
04-10-2018, 09:23 PM
Foam grips help, I use them.

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcSq8wihW28IzlunwQfnHrjxKmK3pNN 1FuPVriYutCZm4eVSdj7pSy3LqpuDTAO_husLPIzF9GY&usqp=CAE

L.W. Baxter
04-10-2018, 09:32 PM
Hmm, constructive idea, I will try new grips, for sure.

Do they make foam footpegs.:d

L.W. Baxter
04-10-2018, 09:33 PM
Every bike and body is different , road conditions. It's best to get off the bike and walk around often . That can be every 10 mins sometimes . Looks like a beautiful road to ride on :)

It's a fantastic road. Oregon is silly with fantastic roads.

DMillet
04-10-2018, 09:34 PM
I rode a 1982 Honda FT500 Ascot, single cylinder, to Florida and back some 30 years ago. I still remember getting off the bike every evening and vibrating until I woke up in the morning.

PeterSibley
04-10-2018, 09:48 PM
If that doesn't work bar end balance weight can help.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eaCggwGz3ZQ

BrianW
04-10-2018, 09:53 PM
From riding a motorcycle 100 miles on easy roads.

Went for a brilliant ride yesterday into our coast range to the Upper Nestucca.

24 hours later my hands and feet are still tingly...My '72 Honda vibrates a bit, as advertised.

Could have gone for another ride today, mowed lawn instead. Hmmm.

I've been scheming a mc tour of Oregon river drainages and mountain ranges on this bike. Could take a while riding 50 miles a day. Not that there's anything wrong with that...

14011


Your’re killing me man. Can’t wait to move to the lower-48.

The Bigfella
04-10-2018, 09:55 PM
Peter beat me to it with the bar end weights. I hate added weight on a bike.... but that's a kilo that's worth it. My Funduro has them and I considered taking them off for the additional lane filtering clearance, but am glad I didn't.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Mtorbikin/i-vQPXhWt/0/5e7622a9/X3/Fundurosale3-X3.jpg

We rode 245 km on Sunday - just over 150 miles. No ill effects.

L.W. Baxter
04-10-2018, 10:07 PM
Your’re killing me man. Can’t wait to move to the lower-48.

It is nice when you get a full-on summer day in early April. Real nice. ��

L.W. Baxter
04-10-2018, 10:09 PM
Alright, grips and bar end weights, I am encouraged that this condition can be alleviated summat.

Canoeyawl
04-10-2018, 10:12 PM
I rode a lot in my youth and worked on motorcycles for a living. Mostly British stuff until I gave them up for good and went with bigger, heavier bikes.

I vaquely remember handle bars and foot pegs rammed full and tight with lead shot...

edit; Today I would melt the lead and pour them full.

L.W. Baxter
04-10-2018, 10:28 PM
I rode a lot in my youth and worked on motorcycles for a living. Mostly British stuff until I gave them up for good and went with bigger, heavier bikes.

I vaquely remember handle bars and foot pegs rammed full and tight with lead shot...

edit; Today I would melt the lead and pour them full.
Ok, I've been checking the internets. Turns out, I'm not the first person to have this problem.

All kinds of suggestions out there. Silicon and bee bees might be lighter than solid lead?

I will start with the grips and move on to the more desperate measures as necessary...

Canoeyawl
04-10-2018, 10:47 PM
I don't think it will take more than 3-4 of pounds of lead, never notice it.

LeeG
04-10-2018, 10:55 PM
It's a fantastic road. Oregon is silly with fantastic roads.

When I was in highschool in SoCal Oregon was Valhalla, eventually we would make it.

The Bigfella
04-10-2018, 11:00 PM
Ok, I've been checking the internets. Turns out, I'm not the first person to have this problem.

All kinds of suggestions out there. Silicon and bee bees might be lighter than solid lead?

I will start with the grips and move on to the more desperate measures as necessary...

The bar end weights are really easy to fit. Just one bolt each. Do them at the same time as the grips... as you need to cut the ends out of the grips

bobbys
04-10-2018, 11:23 PM
When i was 19 i used to ride my honda 450 to cape cod from NJ.

Im still shaking .

PeterSibley
04-11-2018, 12:03 AM
I don't think it will take more than 3-4 of pounds of lead, never notice it.

Strangely enough, it doesn't need much, a few Oz does it. I don't understand the physics of it.

Canoeyawl
04-11-2018, 12:27 AM
I am old enough to have long term effects from this and other vibration issues, and I'm going to say fix it (the bike) as that vibration is really not good for you, and nothing to joke about.

https://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/phys_agents/vibration/vibration_effects.html

TomF
04-11-2018, 06:10 AM
Ok, I've been checking the internets. Turns out, I'm not the first person to have this problem.

All kinds of suggestions out there. Silicon and bee bees might be lighter than solid lead?...I think if you try to jam the handlebars full of silicone coated bees, for quite some time you probably won't even notice the vibration.

Paul Pless
04-11-2018, 06:14 AM
I am old enough to have long term effects from this and other vibration issues, and I'm going to say fix it (the bike) as that vibration is really not good for you, and nothing to joke about.

https://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/phys_agents/vibration/vibration_effects.html
I'm sitting in outpatient surgery, prepping for my third hand surgery to releave a nerve issue as we speak. You know LW, Honda made some really smith fours and sixes. . .;):D

PeterSibley
04-11-2018, 06:30 AM
A K75 BMW is probably the smoothest of them all. Quick too.

Garret
04-11-2018, 06:57 AM
I remember a 350 mile ride to Moosehead Lake in Maine on a Tiger 650 in 45-50 degree rain. Coldest I think I've ever been. Additionally, it took a couple of days to get the buzzing out of my hands & feet.

While it looks funny on a bike like the Triumph (or yours) - floorboards really help. I made some that were maybe 5/8 length & pivoted on the peg. They helped a lot - especially when I added foam insoles to my boots - though today I'd try the gel ones.

Going to the Commando made an unbelievable difference in long rides - no buzzing at all with the Isolastic suspension.

Norman Bernstein
04-11-2018, 07:57 AM
I've done Boston-NY/NJ a couple of times.... but I'm definitely NOT an 'iron-butt' kinda guy. I stop every 40-50 miles for 15 minutes or so. My hands don't bother me, but my butt definitely does, even with the relatively soft seat on my Honda Stateline.

http://www.marisystems.com/images/newbike.JPG

Lew Barrett
04-11-2018, 08:31 AM
It's very difficult to truly fix a bike that has basic imbalances as vertical twins frequently do. The factory fix is through counterbalances or soft/tuned mounts of some sort or another. Norton's Isolastic and BMWs floating mounts (on their singles) were early solutions. Today counterbalancing is almost universal except in those bikes that alredy have inherently balanced configurations. Examples of designs with inherent primary balance are 90 degree V twins, boxers and certain crank configurations. Older straight fours, depending on configuration, will vibrate horribly, often a great deal, as do vertical twins and singles. You may get some relief from weighting the bars and foam grips but you'll feel the pulses through the pegs and seat. It may be enough to weight the bars and isolate them with soft grips or it may be somewhat futile depending on the bike and your sensitivity to the problem. Worth a try but don't be disappointed if it turns out to be just a minor sop.

The best solutions require engineering considerations from the start. Bar end weights and lead shot diminish the effects but nothing beats engineered solutions that are implemented in the design phase. The smoothest running motor I've owned was a BMW K1200RS, which is counterbalanced at the crank. BMW twins have their rocking couple but other than that, they're champs too. My Ducati Testastretta works great in this regard as well as apart from the crankpin offset it has perfect primary balance. In all of these designs, the considerations about balance were made at the pen and paper stage.

Ted Hoppe
04-11-2018, 09:30 AM
I remember back in the day on my honda cb450 I poured and packed fine quality sand in the bars. I also used some large cut rubber O rings on the bars. It helped too.

Consider a look at your front forks. A softer ride with an oil change and/or spring adjustment might help dampen the vibration when ridding. What tires are you running? In that vain - maybe play with the air pressure , just a few pound difference can take a little buzz out or the bike without sacrificing too much.

And the classic question - How buzzy are your mirrors?

Norman Bernstein
04-11-2018, 09:41 AM
It's very difficult to truly fix a bike that has basic imbalances as vertical twins frequently do.

It's the one thing in my new bike I haven't fully gotten used to, yet. Having rented and ridden a number of Harleys, I know that the Honda has substantially less vibration.... but I came from riding a Honda Magna, whose V-4 engine was smooth as butter. I'd judge the Stateline's vibration as 'tolerable'... although I do miss that V-4.

L.W. Baxter
04-11-2018, 01:32 PM
....How buzzy are your mirrors?

Cars without headlights: indistinguishable. Is that a car or a tree?

Cars with headlights: time lapse photo of kid with July 4th sparkler.

L.W. Baxter
04-11-2018, 01:37 PM
I am old enough to have long term effects from this and other vibration issues, and I'm going to say fix it (the bike) as that vibration is really not good for you, and nothing to joke about.

https://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/phys_agents/vibration/vibration_effects.html

And I've already got old carpenter hand pains.

If I'm honest, my hands have felt funny constantly since I got the bike. 1000 miles in 2 months, mostly rides of 50 miles or so.

48 hours after the last ride, I still sense a little numbness. Not good.

Ted Hoppe
04-11-2018, 01:47 PM
And I've already got old carpenter hand pains.

If I'm honest, my hands have felt funny constantly since I got the bike. 1000 miles in 2 months, mostly rides of 50 miles or so.

48 hours after the last ride, I still sense a little numbness. Not good.


Now that is not good. Don't do anything to the bike. Sell the bike and get something modern. Although your bike is way cool, let a young hipster have it and you move on. You should feel fresh and renewed after 50 mile ride. There are plenty of new bikes that are cool and less viby. A recent triumph bonnieville or the like with 10 years would be perfect for your demeaners and style and near dollar for dollar trade.

L.W. Baxter
04-11-2018, 01:58 PM
Now that is not good. Don't do anything to the bike. Sell the bike and get something modern. Although your bike is way cool, let a young hipster have it and you move on. You should feel fresh and renewed after 50 mile ride. There are plenty of new bikes that are cool and less viby. A recent triumph bonnieville or the like with 10 years would be perfect for your demeaners and style and near dollar for dollar trade.

I know you're right, and you're not the first to say or insinuate similar to me.

There's about a hundred reasons to have a modern bike and only one reason to try to keep riding this thing.

mmd
04-11-2018, 02:18 PM
I'll add my voice to the crowd advocating softer (foam or gel) grips, bar weights, and gel insoles in your riding boots.

I still remember the buzz from riding my '72 Honda 350 twin from Halifax to Cape Cod in one go, with a four-hour nap/pit-stop in Saint John.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
04-11-2018, 02:29 PM
If my memory serves me well...

Some Honda bars were mounted in a pair of clamps - each of which was set in a rubber bush - or a pair of rubber bushes - thses can age harden or be over torqued - they are easily changed.

http://www.common-motor.com/honda-handlebar-rubber-damper

As this is to some extent a resonance problem sometimes a simple change to the type of handlebar will make a difference - I like renthal alloys.

Nicholas Carey
04-11-2018, 05:05 PM
Gel gloves: https://olympiagloves.com/gel-motorcycle-gloves-7-tips-to-combat-vibration/

You can get gel grips, too. H/D types who might know a thing or two about vibration seem to like Kuryakn ISO grips: https://www.kuryakyn.com/products/33/iso-grips

mmd
04-11-2018, 05:26 PM
PISN. I drove a bike for a while that had bars mounted on rubber bushings - I hated the feel. Just sayin'... YMMV.

StevenBauer
04-11-2018, 05:32 PM
Your’re killing me man. Can’t wait to move to the lower-48.

This spring sure is slow coming. Even down here in the lower 48 the blue water in the jobsite portapotty was frozen solid this morning...

L.W. Baxter
04-12-2018, 07:03 PM
The good news is, a previous owner already filled the grip sections of my handlebars with molten lead.

The bad news is, bar end weights can't be fit and likely wouldn't help much, anyway.

The good news is, it only took $10 and 3 minutes to put new foam grips on.

The bad news is, I detect very nearly the same level of vibration felt with the old grips.

The good news is, everybody needs a hobby.

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