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skuthorp
03-08-2018, 04:38 PM
Duterte and the Chief Justice at odds. He wants her impeached and out.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/top-judge-faces-impeachment-after-criticising-duterte-3fpg33thl


"The Philippines’ most senior judge has become the latest woman to face ruin after defying President Duterte.Maria Lourdes Sereno, chief justice of the Philippines Supreme Court, faces impeachment for alleged corruption and violations of trust after a vote today in the House of Representatives. She insists that she is innocent of the charges against her and has denounced the growing atmosphere of “authoritarianism” in the Philippines.
“The current state of the nation is one where perceived enemies of the dominant order are considered fair game for harassment, intimidation and persecution, where shortcuts are preferred over adherence to constitutional guarantees of human rights,” Sereno said in a speech in Manila.

Wet Feet
03-08-2018, 09:22 PM
The place was already in trouble ...now its imploding. Bad dark times for the people.

PeterSibley
03-08-2018, 09:35 PM
The thread title is in line for understatement of the decade !

Flying Orca
03-08-2018, 09:50 PM
Interesting times, indeed.

Art Haberland
03-08-2018, 10:50 PM
I wonder how much longer Duterte can keep his iron grip on the Philippines? People like that do not go quietly into the night

Rum_Pirate
03-09-2018, 09:47 AM
I wonder how much longer Duterte can keep his iron grip on the Philippines? People like that do not go quietly into the night


You mean like Papa Doc?



François Duvalier (French pronunciation: ​[fʁɑ̃swa dyvalje] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA/French); 14 April 1907 – 21 April 1971), also known as Papa Doc, was the President of Haiti (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Presidents_of_Haiti) from 1957 to 1971.
He was elected president in 1957 on a populist (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Populism) and black nationalist (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_nationalism) platform, after thwarting a military coup d'état in 1958 his regime rapidly became totalitarian (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Totalitarian).

An undercover death squad, the Tonton Macoute (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonton_Macoute) killed indiscriminately and was thought to be so pervasive that Haitians became fearful of expressing dissent even in private.

Duvalier further solidified his rule by incorporating elements of Haitian mythology (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haitian_mythology) into a personality cult (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personality_cult).

Osborne Russell
03-09-2018, 10:01 AM
The rule of law is under threat everywhere, from the same cause -- citizens shirking their duty, expecting self-government to maintain itself.

Culture of civic virtue or slavery. Pick one.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
03-09-2018, 10:13 AM
I have been going easy on this subject, here, as I can bore for Britain about it.

The 1987 Constitution was settled after the overthrow of Ferdinand Marcos, who was elected under the 1935 Constitution. We will pass over the 1943 Japanese occupation Constitution and the 1973 Marcos Constitution.

The 1987 Constitution contains a serious flaw - one which is also present in the US Constitution, on which both the 1935 and the 1987 Philippines Constitutions are modelled. Both assume that there will be a two party system. Where the two party system has broken down, as happened in the Philippines under the Marcos dictatorship, there may be more than two candidates, in which case, in a first past the post system without a run off election, the winner may be elected by a minority.

De Gaulle very wisely took steps to prevent this in the French Fifth Republic by requiring a run off election between the first and second placed candidates.

Duterte benefitted from a five way election, and gained power on seventeen million votes. He has been active in strengthening his control over the country since then.

Osborne Russell
03-09-2018, 10:25 AM
The 1987 Constitution contains a serious flaw - one which is also present in the US Constitution, on which both the 1935 and the 1987 Philippines Constitutions are modelled. Both assume that there will be a two party system.

You mean like, the majority and the minority parties? Nothing in the US Constitution prevents the minority parties from forming coalitions . . . except for the fact that minority parties don't exist! :arg Why not is a good question.


Where the two party system has broken down, as happened in the Philippines under the Marcos dictatorship, there may be more than two candidates, in which case, in a first past the post system without a run off election, the winner may be elected by a minority.

De Gaulle very wisely took steps to prevent this in the French Fifth Republic by requiring a run off election between the first and second placed candidates.

Duterte benefitted from a five way election, and gained power on seventeen million votes. He has been active in strengthening his control over the country since then.

Sounds to me like the failure of the minority parties to prioritize and cooperate. What's problem one? Duterte? OK then. If they can't get that together, how is it a breakdown of the two party system as opposed to a failure of the parties themselves?

As for the run-off, if there are only two parties, wouldn't it just be a re-run?

p.s. what does "bore for Britain" mean?

Andrew Craig-Bennett
03-09-2018, 10:28 AM
Duterte is the son of a Marcos crony who had been Governor of the former Davao province. He was appointed Mayor of Davao City by Corazon Aquino and conducted himself in the manner commonly found amongst Filipino regional bosses - a little murder, a little smuggling, a rake off the top from all businesses established in "his" city. His elevation to the Big Time was backed by the Marcos family and by the disgraced former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, using some Chinese funding. The role of Facebook in all this is steadily becoming clearer, and it does not reflect well on Mr Zuckerberg.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
03-09-2018, 10:33 AM
You mean like, the majority and the minority parties? Nothing in the US Constitution prevents the minority parties from forming coalitions . . . except for the fact that minority parties don't exist! :arg Why not is a good question.

In the Philippines, the party system itself is weak. Local bosses fund their own election campaigns.




Sounds to me like the failure of the minority parties to prioritize and cooperate. What's problem one? Duterte? OK then. If they can't get that together, how is it a breakdown of the two party system as opposed to a failure of the parties themselves?

See above. "what parties?"


As for the run-off, if there are only two parties, wouldn't it just be a re-run?

Yes, it would be.


p.s. what does "bore for Britain" mean?

Just a joke.

Edited to add "See - I've done it again!"

Osborne Russell
03-09-2018, 09:33 PM
Edited to add "See - I've done it again!"

Done what?