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View Full Version : Republicans Correct... there is voter fraud



David G
01-27-2018, 11:57 PM
OK... just not the sort they claim. But there IS some. By Republicans --

Former Colorado GOP chairman sentenced for voter fraud
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/steve-curtis-former-colorado-gop-chairman-sentenced-for-voter-fraud/

David G
01-28-2018, 12:25 PM
Where's the outrage from the usual suspects? <G>

stromborg
01-28-2018, 02:20 PM
Willful blindness?

Ian McColgin
01-28-2018, 03:06 PM
Diabilical diabetes.

Ian McColgin
01-28-2018, 03:08 PM
But then, what this one vote compared to the millions Hillary bussed in from Mexico to vote for her?

mdh
01-28-2018, 04:31 PM
Ex Mayor of Tulsa also had a home in Florida, was found to have voted both places. Dimocrat.

Ian McColgin
01-28-2018, 06:57 PM
A primary opponent in the 2006 mayoral race charged that Kathy Taylor had voted in Florida and Oklahoma during the 2000 presidential. She and her husband had lived a while in each state and Florida at least mailed an absentee ballot. But both Oklahoma and Florida law provide that voting records are to be destroyed after any challenge period is over, something Taylor's primary opponent (and the perfervid right wing press reporters hot on the case) ought to know. And he ought to have known that making an unsupportable and unrebuttable charge would leave the DA, on investigating the charge, with no possiblity of proof.

It appears that most Tulsa voters in the primary and the general were little impressed with serious charges made by people who knew the charges were not in any way demonstrable. Taylor denied it and went on to win the primary and then the mayoral race.

skuthorp
01-28-2018, 06:59 PM
Of course there's voter fraud, gerrymandered electorates being the most obvious and egregious example.

S.V. Airlie
01-28-2018, 07:44 PM
Ex Mayor of Tulsa also had a home in Florida, was found to have voted both places. Dimocrat.Funny, so did Bannon! Republican leader of Trump's'campaign. Even better than being just a democrat, a power in Trump' campaign. What do you think of that cookie mdh?

Ian McColgin
01-28-2018, 08:31 PM
Actually, a number of rich people with summer homes on Cape Cod have been motivated to register locally and are not going to caught if their permanent address is out of state. There are towns where there are serious frictions between year-rounders and summer people, usually around property taxes, school budgets, mooring fees, snow removal budgets, and zoning issues.

Some advocate that if you own property some place you ought to have a right to vote there, no matter where else you may also vote. With out founding, most states allowed voting by white male property owners only. It took till 1856 for all states to end the property requirement, state by state and without constitutional ammendment. Ever since then, ownership of property has had nothing to do with voting. These rich people have a legitimate point of view that as part time residents, they cost less and therefore should pay less. Why should people who live in the Virginia hunt country and send their boys to Choate pay high school taxes in Chatham?

As far as I've observed, this is more of a wealth thing than a party or ideology thing.

S.V. Airlie
01-28-2018, 08:58 PM
But, one of Bannon's addresses was an abandoned house Ian.

Art Haberland
01-28-2018, 11:26 PM
Again, if you want to know what the Republicans are up to, just look at what they are trying to convince us the Democrats are doing.

Phillip Allen
01-29-2018, 01:11 AM
fraud... yep... who said there was none and now says it don't count?

john l
01-29-2018, 06:58 AM
I wonder why the Trump administration disbanded the voter fraud committee?

mdh
01-29-2018, 09:01 AM
A primary opponent in the 2006 mayoral race charged that Kathy Taylor had voted in Florida and Oklahoma during the 2000 presidential. She and her husband had lived a while in each state and Florida at least mailed an absentee ballot. But both Oklahoma and Florida law provide that voting records are to be destroyed after any challenge period is over, something Taylor's primary opponent (and the perfervid right wing press reporters hot on the case) ought to know. And he ought to have known that making an unsupportable and unrebuttable charge would leave the DA, on investigating the charge, with no possiblity of proof.

It appears that most Tulsa voters in the primary and the general were little impressed with serious charges made by people who knew the charges were not in any way demonstrable. Taylor denied it and went on to win the primary and then the mayoral race.

I'm gonna go out on a limb and say you are much more knowledgeable of Hyannis politics than i.

Keith Wilson
01-29-2018, 09:03 AM
I'm gonna go out on a limb and say you are much more knowledgeable of Hyannis politics than i.I'm gonna go out on a limb and say it appears he's also much more knowledgeable about the case of Ms. Taylor than you are.

S.V. Airlie
01-29-2018, 09:26 AM
fraud... yep... who said there was none and now says it don't count?No one has said there is none, there are always a few but, not 3 million which is the number Trump is pontificating over and why he say he didn't win the popular vote.

AlanMc
01-29-2018, 09:52 AM
i see the children are out in force today!

voter fraud, lock him up. i don't care who they voted for. lock them up. it's quite simple.

SKIP KILPATRICK
01-29-2018, 09:53 AM
Lock her up! Lock her up!

Keith Wilson
01-29-2018, 10:00 AM
One more time:

Republicans have proposed multiple changes to the laws of supposedly reduce voter fraud (mostly ID laws, but others as well). The kind of fraud that any of these changes would correct - in-person voter impersonation - is almost nonexistent. There is no evidence whatsoever that it has happened in any recent election more than a couple of times, and certainly nowhere near enough to affect the result of any election. The effect of these laws is not to reduce fraud by any significant amount, but to disenfranchise a fair number of legitimate voters, a majority of which are likely to vote Democratic. While some folks have been deceived that this comes from a legitimate concern for election integrity, it's actually another attempt by Republicans to delay the effects of unfavorable demographic changes; to keep those likely to vote against them away from the polls by any means possible

It will only work for a while. A reckoning is coming.

A thought experiment: Should keeping legitimate voters from exercising their rights be punished the same way as voting fraudulently? Why not?

Art Haberland
01-29-2018, 10:04 AM
indeed the pendulum has been swinging one way for a while, it is slowing and about to start swinging back

AlanMc
01-29-2018, 10:05 AM
One more time:

Republicans have proposed multiple changes to the laws of supposedly reduce voter fraud (mostly ID laws, but others as well). The kind of fraud that any of these changes would correct - in-person voter impersonation - is almost nonexistent. There is no evidence whatsoever that it has happened in any recent election more than a couple of times, and certainly nowhere near enough to affect the result of any election. The effect of these laws is not to reduce fraud by any significant amount, but to disenfranchise a fair number of legitimate voters, a majority of which are likely to vote Democratic. While some folks have been deceived that this comes from a legitimate concern for election integrity, it's actually another attempt by Republicans to delay the effects of unfavorable demographic changes; to keep those likely to vote against them away from the polls by any means possible

It will only work for a while. A reckoning is coming.

A thought experiment: Should keeping legitimate voters from exercising their rights be punished the same way as voting fraudulently? Why not?


seems like the answer is no in Philly

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Black_Panther_Party_voter_intimidation_case

S.V. Airlie
01-29-2018, 10:17 AM
i see the children are out in force today!

voter fraud, lock him up. i don't care who they voted for. lock them up. it's quite simple.I see you came and joined us. What's wrong, no room at the adult table?

AlanMc
01-29-2018, 10:26 AM
I see you came and joined us. What's wrong, no room at the adult table?



bringing the 8th grade level heat this morning! i'd better stay on my toes. :rolleyes:

S.V. Airlie
01-29-2018, 10:28 AM
bringing the 8th grade level heat this morning! i'd better stay on my toes. :rolleyes: Come back and post when you get to the 8th grade then

AlanMc
01-29-2018, 10:40 AM
Come back and post when you get to the 8th grade then



ooooo, bazinga!

Ian McColgin
01-29-2018, 11:32 AM
My state senator uncle used to say about another uncle. "Ah he's so apolitical he only votes but once."

Joking aside, Phillip will recall if he were to bother, no one said there is no voter fraud. There is very very little, as documented by the scant number of investigations that actually get launched. What there is none of, so far as has been reported, is any sort of voter fraud that could be detected or prevented by the polling place ID laws being implemented around the nation. As it happens, this point is born out by the examples in this thread, none of which could be addressed by polling place ID.

Traditional voter fraud - stuffing the box - may or may not have evolved to sophisticated hacking but the more modern and cost effective approaches are pols selecting their voters AKA gerrymandering, and voter suppression via targeted polling place ID hassels.

One person voting twice as happened or was claimed without proof to have happened in examples here really cannot happen in the volumes it would take to change a national election.

David G
01-29-2018, 10:45 PM
Some folks are so dense, and so ignorant of the larger issues, that they don't recognize a lampoon when it sidles up to 'em and licks their ear. The usual suspects, of course.

Canoeyawl
01-29-2018, 11:34 PM
A lampoon you say, was it hafted and barbed?

David G
01-30-2018, 12:06 PM
A lampoon you say, was it hafted and barbed? None of that - but it had a lithium ion battery and led bulbs... <G>