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View Full Version : Well let's get the jibes overwith.



Chippie
12-19-2017, 03:24 AM
https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/uknews/hms-queen-elizabeth-britains-new-%c2%a331bn-aircraft-carrier-has-a-leak/ar-BBH0sek?ocid=spartandhp

Off you go.

birlinn
12-19-2017, 03:58 AM
Plenty of time to sort it- another 4 years before the F35s arrive. A carrier with no planes until then!
If we can still afford them.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
12-19-2017, 04:17 AM
The reporter on radio four said that the prop shaft was seven metres n diameter, this seems improbable.

epoxyboy
12-19-2017, 04:25 AM
https://youtu.be/wswFjuJPbxg

skuthorp
12-19-2017, 04:41 AM
They just need an Elizabethan Bilge pump…….
https://qph.ec.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-46fd6c9f01c1d661a8e5b388055c1f99-c

Chippie
12-19-2017, 06:39 AM
The reporter on radio four said that the prop shaft was seven metres n diameter, this seems improbable.


https://www.rolls-royce.com/~/media/Files/R/Rolls-Royce/documents/news/6-page-qe-booklet-tcm92-58802.pdf

"7m in diameter and weighs 33 tonnes"

Peerie Maa
12-19-2017, 06:49 AM
A Royal Navy spokesman said: "An issue with a shaft seal has been identified during HMS Queen Elizabeth's sea trials; this is scheduled for repair while she is alongside at Portsmouth.Which is what sea trials are for. Finding problems.

Peerie Maa
12-19-2017, 06:51 AM
https://www.rolls-royce.com/~/media/Files/R/Rolls-Royce/documents/news/6-page-qe-booklet-tcm92-58802.pdf

"7m in diameter and weighs 33 tonnes"

Those are the propellers, not the shafts.

beernd
12-19-2017, 08:16 AM
https://www.rolls-royce.com/~/media/Files/R/Rolls-Royce/documents/news/6-page-qe-booklet-tcm92-58802.pdf

"7m in diameter and weighs 33 tonnes"

According to the file the propellers are 7 m in diameter.

OOPS Peerie Maa beat me to it.:o

Puttputt
12-19-2017, 11:21 AM
Maybe they can fix it during spring haul out when they paint the bottom and replace the zincs.

amish rob
12-19-2017, 11:22 AM
https://youtu.be/jbNvPoumEVU

Peace,
Robert

Jim Bow
12-19-2017, 11:36 AM
Plenty of time to sort it- another 4 years before the F35s arrive. A carrier with no planes until then!
If we can still afford them.
You really believe F35s will be available in 4 years? How cute.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
12-19-2017, 01:04 PM
That newspaper report contains at least one lie:

"...ten thousand people worked on the ship..."

It should have read "...ten thousand people pretended to work on the ship..."

If what I hear is true, the leak has been there since the wretched thing was floated out, as one of the shafts is 15mm out of true, which is a bit of a disaster, and leads one to start wondering about other traditional practices of British shipbuilders such as bunging in welding rods and epoxing in just the top 18" of a main engine holding down bolt, with the rest of the thing entirely missing.

You may think that the welding rod "thing" is a myth that dates back to the Liberty Ships; I am here to tell you that on a bulk carrier built in Sunderland in 1984 the diesel oil daily service and settling tanks shared a bulkhead and when the C/E asked the 2/E to purify the lot... and came back to find equal amounts in both tanks... we found welding rods stuffed into the weld....

Oh and the business of short ends pretending to be bolts. Same ship, also true.

Peerie Maa
12-19-2017, 01:13 PM
That newspaper report contains at least one lie:

"...ten thousand people worked on the ship..."

It should have read "...ten thousand people pretended to work on the ship..."

If what I hear is true, the leak has been there since the wretched thing was floated out, as one of the shafts is 15mm out of true, which is a bit of a disaster, and leads one to start wondering about other traditional practices of British shipbuilders such as bunging in welding rods and epoxing in just the top 18" of a main engine holding down bolt, with the rest of the thing entirely missing.

You may think that the welding rod "thing" is a myth that dates back to the Liberty Ships; I am here to tell you that on a bulk carrier built in Sunderland in 1984 the diesel oil daily service and settling tanks shared a bulkhead and when the C/E asked the 2/E to purify the lot... and came back to find equal amounts in both tanks... we found welding rods stuffed into the weld....

Oh and the business of short ends pretending to be bolts. Same ship, also true.

Have you heard the urban myth about a steam line bolted together with candles?

Andrew Craig-Bennett
12-19-2017, 01:32 PM
Have you heard the urban myth about a steam line bolted together with candles?

Yes, and the one about four Allen generators being supplied in crates to Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, in 1967 for a Blue Funnel "Super P" cargo liner, one of the crates going missing, and being eventually discovered, with every component being copied, at dead of night, elsewhere in the yard, is also true. The ship was being supervised by CNCo - and for many years after that a very fine copy of an Allen could be had in Japan, courtesy of Daihatsu - we had a pair on the Coral Princess...

Andrew Craig-Bennett
12-19-2017, 01:38 PM
I have built two ships in Britain and wild horses would not make try it again.

Exhibit A - Sunderland Shipbuilders, 1984: The one with the welding rods and the fake bolt.
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/data/510/002177.jpg

Exhibit B Belfast, ten years later:

http://i43.tinypic.com/21xuf6.jpg

birlinn
12-19-2017, 01:45 PM
Have you heard the urban myth about a steam line bolted together with candles?

Four candles?

Andrew Craig-Bennett
12-19-2017, 01:49 PM
Four candles?

Bet it wasn't Schedule 80.

mmd
12-19-2017, 01:54 PM
I worked for a short while for a manufacturer of high-precision plastic thermoforming machines. A small company in Japanese conglomerate purchased one of our larger models and were more than a bit perturbed to find out that we did not train their people in the maintenance & overhaul procedures, but provided a factory technician for initial set-up and to be available at their beckoning for later needs. After the initial set-up at their facility, they never called for our technician, which normally occurs two or three times a year. About a year later, our tech got a call because they couldn't adjust the platen-to-cutter clearances properly. The tech visited the small company, where the original machine was nowhere in sight (they told him that they merely repainted the original machine in their company colours), and reported that the machine on-site wasn't our machine, but a copy of it. A pretty good copy, too, but subtle differences in the platen carriage mechanisms made it impossible to adjust to cut 0.010" plastic to within 0.0003" of the platen surface across the whole 40" x 30" platen. That must have been a costly attempt at copying, as the machine cost well over $300k plus shipping, and then the time & effort to disassemble, measure (apparently badly), and machine new pieces would be three or four times the original purchase price. What a wicked web we weave...

Rum_Pirate
12-19-2017, 01:58 PM
Four candles?



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OCbvCRkl_4U

Rich Jones
12-19-2017, 02:21 PM
Sounds like it's time to send a Midshipman out with the press gang for a crew to man the pumps.

skuthorp
12-19-2017, 02:49 PM
Sabotage of a military vessel, what does that carry these days?

Sailor
12-20-2017, 11:02 AM
Stuffing welds full of welding rod isn't reserved for British shipbuilders. Nor is stuffing bundles of them into the black water lines before welding them up again. The individual who told me the story brought them bundle of rods to the project manager and told him they had figured out why the black water system wasn't working. The PM's reply was something to the effect of "how did your guys flush a bundle of welding rods down the toilet?"