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Reynard38
10-30-2017, 09:23 AM
Thinking next daily driver. The new CX-5 will supposedly be available with a 2.2 liter diesel here in the states. 310ft/lb of torque and @ 40mpg. They've been selling the engine to the rest of the world for some time now.
Anybody here have any experience with Mazda? There reliability looks good. At @ $37k loaded it'd be a relatively inexpensive, efficient and not bad looking ride.

Norman Bernstein
10-30-2017, 09:25 AM
I never owned one... but I leased a couple of them, back when Mazda had incredibly cheap leasing deals, in the late 90's... they were good cars. My daughter owned a Mazda 3 for a bunch of years, and it was reliable and dependable... until a huge tree fell squarely on it, and squashed it flat. She replaced it with an identical model :)

SKIP KILPATRICK
10-30-2017, 09:26 AM
Love them! Myself and my extended family have owned many since the mid 70's.

IMHO, Very reliable and inexpensive to maintain.

John Smith
10-30-2017, 09:38 AM
Daughter owns one and seems to like it fine.

Figment
10-30-2017, 09:48 AM
I've been eyeing a Volvo V90 as my next DD lately, but for $10k less I'm probably going to talk myself into the Mazda CX-9 instead.

For me, the mazdas have two drawbacks. The first is that they seem to have one steering wheel for the entire product line, with the miata as the design basis... it's friggin TINY, feels somewhat ridiculous.
The second is that I have a strong dislike of black interiors, and while you can get non-black seats in the mazda everything else remains black.

But they do drive nicely and the reliability should be a non-issue for the 50k mile term of my lease.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
10-30-2017, 09:54 AM
I have just completed 145,515 miles in a Ford Mondeo which has the same engine (2.2 litre Duratorq diesel, 200 hp, 429 N-m torque, Euro 5 emissions) It has been quiet, smooth and faultless.

Dan McCosh
10-30-2017, 10:29 AM
Have a Mazda in the family at the moment--an old Mazda 6 sedan. The marque tends towards the lower-middle in reliability studies. This was a used car, which took some substantial work to make it useable. One problem is the dealer network, parts, etc. Their small volume tends to create service problems, including parts availability. The newer models are excellent designs, and rank with the best for handling and driving. Their newer gas engines are the most efficient on the market. Dunno about the U.S. version of the diesel, but it should be quite good. Might anticipate the usual Mazda service problems, however.

carioca1232001
10-30-2017, 10:52 AM
I have just completed 145,515 miles in a Ford Mondeo which has the same engine (2.2 litre Duratorq diesel, 200 hp, 429 N-m torque, Euro 5 emissions) It has been quiet, smooth and faultless.

200 hp out of a 2.2 litre diesel engine is rather impressive, as 150 hp is the normal (peak) power rating of diesel engines with similar displacement.

Curious as to where the red-line sits on the tachometer.

ron ll
10-30-2017, 10:58 AM
Had a '93 MX6 for several years, really enjoyed it, very comfortable car. A couple of downs, the Mazda paint in those years was terrible and faded to and thru the primer in no time. And the door closing sound always sounded really tinny, not that that is a measure of anything, but it sure gives a bad impression. BTW, this was a model that was final assembled in Flint MI. But I might consider buying another Mazda.

Rum_Pirate
10-30-2017, 11:01 AM
Doesn't FORD own, of part of, Mazda?

I have owned a number of Mazdas (right hand drive Japanese spec) and had few issues with them.

pkrone
10-30-2017, 11:11 AM
I've had 3 mazdas: a 1995 626, a 2008 Mazdaspeed 3, and a 1992 Miata. Still got the Miata. They've all been great cars.

Todd Bradshaw
10-30-2017, 11:12 AM
We still have a 2005 Tribute, currently with 101,000 miles on it that is our daily driver. It has been excellent, with a minimum of problems over the years and nothing that wouldn't be considered normal wear and tear or maintenance. When it goes, we'll probably replace it with a Mazda 3.

JimD
10-30-2017, 11:34 AM
Mrs JimD had a Protege for many years. Great trouble free car. Finally scrapped it for a Toyota Prius this year. I had a couple of the old B2200s which were equally good vehicles, until Ford took them over and then they were just Ford Rangers with a Mazda logo.

David G
10-30-2017, 11:55 AM
I've owned two Mazdas, and lived with (girlfriend) another. As a result of my experience, I'm partial to the marque. The most recent was a MPV, which doubled as a work vehicle. I liked it because it was uneventfully carefree. For regular maintenance, my mechanics like it because it was nicely set up for working on. Which translated into 'cheaper' for me. In preparation for becoming parents, one of the boys & his sweetie were shopping for a cute-ute a while back, and I suggested they look at the CX-5. Very good reviews. Too new, though to have used ones in their price range, so they ended up with a Subaru Forester. Also a nice rig.

Bobcat
10-30-2017, 12:08 PM
We bought a Mazda 3 hatchback in August with a 2.5 liter engine. Took a 10 day road trip with it. I love it so far

Reynard38
10-30-2017, 12:19 PM
Wow, that's quite a few! Mostly very positive responses. Thanks!
I've thought about some other more expensive marques, but I'm keeping my 2001 M Roadster so the fun car box is checked and I've gotten used to NOT having a car payment. Also I just can't justify spending $60k plus on a car that I'll be putting a lot of miles on.
I've looked at a few CX-5's with good looking aftermarket wheels and a few bobs and bits. They look really good.
As to the black interiors my last 2 cars have been tan. I am really over tan so black would be great.
Great to hear about the engine. For the US market it's supposedly 173hp and 310 ft/lb. Most likely for US emmisions which punish NOx more than CO2.

David G
10-30-2017, 12:20 PM
Oh... and I forgot the 'Mercury Tracer' wagon my wife owned for years. The badge said Mercury, but the collaboration between Ford & Mazda meant our wagon was mostly Mazda. A great rig.

john welsford
10-30-2017, 01:02 PM
Thinking next daily driver. The new CX-5 will supposedly be available with a 2.2 liter diesel here in the states. 310ft/lb of torque and @ 40mpg. They've been selling the engine to the rest of the world for some time now.
Anybody here have any experience with Mazda? There reliability looks good. At @ $37k loaded it'd be a relatively inexpensive, efficient and not bad looking ride.

I've had several over the years, exceptional reliability, good performance, fair comfort.
Many of the "Ford" branded cars and pickups here are actually rebadged Mazdas, and the pickup in particular is a great vehicle, makes an F150 look pretty bad.

John Welsford

skuthorp
10-30-2017, 03:16 PM
We and other family members had a series of them, various versions from a sports model to a 4WD. Found them reliable, comfortable, economical. Only reason I didn't buy one this time round was the difficulty of loading boats on top owing to the rear slope and the subsequent short distance between the bars.
Bought a Kia SUV. Very satisfactory.

Dan McCosh
10-30-2017, 04:21 PM
Doesn't FORD own, of part of, Mazda?

I have owned a number of Mazdas (right hand drive Japanese spec) and had few issues with them. Ford used to have a financial interest in Mazda. Mazda did considerable engineering work for Ford, and built some of Ford's cars. I'm surprised you haven't joined in, giving your relentless unhappiness with the Ford-badged Mazda you have owned. I think if you were unhappy with Mazda, you would be unhappy with Ford.

peb
10-30-2017, 04:31 PM
I have a 2014 CX-5, almost 100,000 miles n it. Bought it in October,2013.
So far it has been a great car. Gas milage in the city is a little lower than I had hoped. But no complaints at all. Very smooth ride in the highway for a small car.

Oh, the cup holders suck.

Sent from my BLN-L24 using Tapatalk

peb
10-30-2017, 04:33 PM
At the state fair car show, I was really impressed with the Subaru small SUV, forget the name.

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David G
10-30-2017, 04:39 PM
At the state fair car show, I was really impressed with the Subaru small SUV, forget the name.

Sent from my BLN-L24 using Tapatalk

See #14

Stiletto
10-30-2017, 04:41 PM
I have a Ford badged Mazda ute, 2.5 turbodiesel which although being a 2004 model,I have had no problems with.
Mazdas sell well here. There has been some criticism of the CX-5 having a bit much road noise and somewhat limited rear legroom. Several different models of Mazdas have been criticized for the road noise, but it may be a NZ problem because of the coarse-chip seal that many of our roads have.

leikec
10-30-2017, 04:48 PM
I think the Honda Pilot would be a better vehicle in real world conditions.

I currently own a 2016 Mazda Cx3, and I consider it to be over-engineered and under built for a car that has to survive in Northern Michigan. The same could be said for the Mazda tthe Cx3 replaced, a 2011 Mazda CX-7.

Sky Activ technology is Mazda's term for designing and building their cars as light and lean as possible, and it shows up in rural driving up here in a way that it wouldn't have during my previous life in Missouri.

This is area up here is tough on cars...in winter most of all, but even during the other three seasons.

Jeff C

David G
10-30-2017, 05:04 PM
I think the Honda Pilot would be a better vehicle in real world conditions.

I currently own a 2016 Mazda Cx3, and I consider it to be over-engineered and under built for a car that has to survive in Northern Michigan. The same could be said for the Mazda tthe Cx3 replaced, a 2011 Mazda CX-7.

Sky Activ technology is Mazda's term for designing and building their cars as light and lean as possible, and it shows up in rural driving up here in a way that it wouldn't have during my previous life in Missouri.

This is area up here is tough on cars...in winter most of all, but even during the other three seasons.

Jeff CYou do know that Honda Pilot to Mazda CX-3 is not a direct comparison... right?

The CX-9 would be a more direct comparison to the Pilot. Also the Highlander, Sorrento, Explorer, Pathfinder, etc. The category is called 'Midsized SUV'.

But I've read some good reviews of the Pilot... if the OP wanted to step up to a bigger vehicle. The older version seems a bit stodgy.

Cross-shopping the CX-5 will lead you to: Honda CR-V, Subaru Forester, Kia Sportage, Rav4, and Jeep Cherokee.

leikec
10-30-2017, 05:28 PM
You do know that Honda Pilot to Mazda CX-3 is not a direct comparison... right?

The CX-9 would be a more direct comparison to the Pilot. Also the Highlander, Sorrento, Explorer, Pathfinder, etc. The category is called 'Midsized SUV'.

But I've read some good reviews of the Pilot... if the OP wanted to step up to a bigger vehicle. The older version seems a bit stodgy.

Cross-shopping the CX-5 will lead you to: Honda CR-V, Subaru Forester, Kia Sportage, Rav4, and Jeep Cherokee.

I like the Pilot, and it's well regarded, reliable and built to last--areas where I think the Mazda lineup is lacking. It is also priced in such a manner as to be attainable in the price range Reynaud mentioned. I'll leave the direct comparisons between manufacturers to you and others.

Jeff C

Reynard38
10-30-2017, 06:12 PM
Won't be doing any off roading, plus the roads down here are pretty good compared to what I've driven on up north. Mazda has always erred toward performance. I like that especially considering what I've been driving.
The main selling point will be the availability of the diesel power plant. Lots of torque for pulling a boat with great mileage when unencumbered is a great combination. If they do as they say and bring the diesel here I'll go have a drive and maybe pull the trigger. My 2001 330i has been a great car, but at 170k is starting to show its age.

Reynard38
10-30-2017, 06:13 PM
5210

20" wheels and a bit of lowering and it doesn't look like a "mom car" anymore. More hot hatch than SUV.

David G
10-30-2017, 11:29 PM
I'm not sure I'm in love with the styling of the CX-5... but among all the other 'video game' influenced looks out there, it's not terrible. I like smoother, less busy lines. But one can't recommend aesthetics.

Figment
10-31-2017, 08:47 AM
[design nitpick]

Tragic.
The driver's door handle on that one is just tragic. Located precisely at the conflux of every curvature on the car.

A number of cars now have the door handles on the B-pillar and C-pillar. Much cleaner, even if it does mean that the kids can't open the doors on their own until age 8.

[/design nitpick]

Dan McCosh
10-31-2017, 08:51 AM
I think the Honda Pilot would be a better vehicle in real world conditions.

I currently own a 2016 Mazda Cx3, and I consider it to be over-engineered and under built for a car that has to survive in Northern Michigan. The same could be said for the Mazda tthe Cx3 replaced, a 2011 Mazda CX-7.

Sky Activ technology is Mazda's term for designing and building their cars as light and lean as possible, and it shows up in rural driving up here in a way that it wouldn't have during my previous life in Missouri.

This is area up here is tough on cars...in winter most of all, but even during the other three seasons.

Jeff C FWIW, Sky Activ is Mazda's name for its latest-generation gas engines, which have been drastically re-engineered to maximize fuel efficiency.

Reynard38
10-31-2017, 08:53 AM
The Tesla and the new Range Rover Velar (also under consideration) have a very elegant solution to the door handles, but it does come at a price.

Dan McCosh
10-31-2017, 09:04 AM
Won't be doing any off roading, plus the roads down here are pretty good compared to what I've driven on up north. Mazda has always erred toward performance. I like that especially considering what I've been driving.
The main selling point will be the availability of the diesel power plant. Lots of torque for pulling a boat with great mileage when unencumbered is a great combination. If they do as they say and bring the diesel here I'll go have a drive and maybe pull the trigger. My 2001 330i has been a great car, but at 170k is starting to show its age. Might note that the gas CX5 has a fairly low towing rating at 2,000 lbs. The diesel may or may not improve this. The gas Equinox tows 3,500 lbs, but the diesel is worse.

Dan McCosh
10-31-2017, 09:06 AM
The Tesla and the new Range Rover Velar (also under consideration) have a very elegant solution to the door handles, but it does come at a price. You learn to limbo when gull-wing doors fail.

Figment
10-31-2017, 09:32 AM
I suspect that the tow rating has very little to do with the powertrain, more to do with chassis/suspension.

Borrowing from Monty Python.... it's a simple question of weight ratios!

David G
10-31-2017, 09:38 AM
The Tesla and the new Range Rover Velar (also under consideration) have a very elegant solution to the door handles, but it does come at a price.

Range Rover consistently falls into the lower ranges of reliability... Tesla Model X doesn't do that great, either. Though the one friend that ones one is quite happy with it. Overall... autos are much more reliable and long-lived than when we were growing up.

Dan McCosh
10-31-2017, 09:39 AM
I suspect that the tow rating has very little to do with the powertrain, more to do with chassis/suspension.

Borrowing from Monty Python.... it's a simple question of weight ratios! The tow rating is affected by several things, but the powertrain is the main element. Available torque from the engine, the torque rating of the transmission, and cooling at higher power outputs are the main elements.

Reynard38
10-31-2017, 03:43 PM
The tow rating is affected by several things, but the powertrain is the main element. Available torque from the engine, the torque rating of the transmission, and cooling at higher power outputs are the main elements.

Intersting how the towing capacities vary by national market. The US is always much lower, often by 50%.
Our BMW wagon doesn't even list a low rating here, but in Germany it's rated at 1800KG. Same engine, same transmission.
Of course the BMW SUV's are built in SC. You got a trailer, get the SUV is what the dealer will tell you.
I've also been told that most euro trailers come equipped with surge brakes, but typically only large trailers here have brakes and then they are usually electric. In Europe they usually have 2 tow ratings. One for a braked trailer, one unbraked. Makes sense.
I thinks it's probably down to marketing and lawyers.
I also always get a kick when Bubba at the boat ramp tells me I need a pickup truck. I always respond why? I rarely get an answer.

WX
10-31-2017, 03:54 PM
We have a 323 Astina and we really like it.

Nicholas Carey
10-31-2017, 07:03 PM
2011 Mazda 5. Mostly because it's the only minivan out there that's still actually anything resembling "mini". Also half the price of a Honda Odyessy.

It's been great. Handles remarkably well on the twisties (it's built on the same platform as a Mazda 3).

AnalogKid
10-31-2017, 07:14 PM
FWIW, Sky Activ is Mazda's name for its latest-generation gas engines, which have been drastically re-engineered to maximize fuel efficiency.

Nope, SkyActiv is the overall paradigm of building light, strong and efficient. it includes the engine technologies SkyActiv-G, SkyActiv-D and the new, not yet in production SkyActiv-X which are all engine-specific technological applications of the philosophy.


SKYACTIV TECHNOLOGY has kick-started a revolution, taking cars to the next level by redefining everything, from the engine and transmission to the platform. But the story behind this revolution is not just about cutting-edge technology and sophisticated engineering. History and heritage also played an important role. (http://www.mazda.com/en/innovation/technology/skyactiv/)

Nicholas Carey
10-31-2017, 07:35 PM
Intersting how the towing capacities vary by national market. The US is always much lower, often by 50%.
Our BMW wagon doesn't even list a low rating here, but in Germany it's rated at 1800KG. Same engine, same transmission.
Of course the BMW SUV's are built in SC. You got a trailer, get the SUV is what the dealer will tell you.
I've also been told that most euro trailers come equipped with surge brakes, but typically only large trailers here have brakes and then they are usually electric. In Europe they usually have 2 tow ratings. One for a braked trailer, one unbraked. Makes sense.
I thinks it's probably down to marketing and lawyers.

I has me a 2004 Honda CR-V. Fine little beast it is, too. Made both in Japan and in the UK.

The US manual for my CR-V lists a 1,200 pound tow limit. The UK manual for the exact same vehicle lists a 1,200 kilogram tow limit. Depending on which way you want to look at things, the US tow limit is some 45 percent lower than the UK tow limit...or you might say, the UK tow limit is some 220 percent higher than the US two limit.

As near as anybody in the Honda CR-V groups from either side of the pond can figure out, there doesn't look to be a thing different between the vehicles intended for the US market or the UK market that would affect towing, like the relevant part numbers all look to be the same.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kXnQ7PZ_8Po

epoxyboy
11-01-2017, 04:00 AM
^ In NZ, most vehicles around that size will be 1200kg with a braked trailer, and about 800kg unbraked.
We tow a 1200 kg caravan with a 2.0l turbo diesel Hyundai IX35. Does a much better job than tbe V6 petrol Camry than it replaced - miles more stable handling, about half the fuel cost with the way gas vs diesel is priced here, and far fewer gearshifts, even over the alps.
But, we have 90kph speed limit for towing vehicles (If you've been on our roads, you'd understand), but not sure I'd want to try towing the van at 80mph with that rig, even on a good day.

Pete

Dan McCosh
11-01-2017, 09:59 AM
Intersting how the towing capacities vary by national market. The US is always much lower, often by 50%.
Our BMW wagon doesn't even list a low rating here, but in Germany it's rated at 1800KG. Same engine, same transmission.
Of course the BMW SUV's are built in SC. You got a trailer, get the SUV is what the dealer will tell you.
I've also been told that most euro trailers come equipped with surge brakes, but typically only large trailers here have brakes and then they are usually electric. In Europe they usually have 2 tow ratings. One for a braked trailer, one unbraked. Makes sense.
I thinks it's probably down to marketing and lawyers.
I also always get a kick when Bubba at the boat ramp tells me I need a pickup truck. I always respond why? I rarely get an answer. Towing ratings in the US are mainly set by the SAE standard J2807, which is a standard that sets minimum performance, mainly for acceleration, braking and hill climbing, at the rated gross weight--the combination of tow vehicle and trailer. Most manufacturers use this standard to get their advertised tow ratings, although it isn't mandatory. US pickups, which are the primary tow vehicles, are generally rated conservatively for both cargo weight capability and towing. Might be the result of US customers tending to overload and carry what fits, ignoring what it weighs. Same issue tends carry over into SUVs, at least the full-size, truck-based SUVs. The compact SUVs today are actually tall station wagons, and have similar limitations for towing. Realistically, towing can mean hauling a load up a mountain grade, or moving a trailer around a parking lot. The towing rating is supposed to reflect use including reasonable performance and safety on the highway.

Dan McCosh
11-01-2017, 10:08 AM
Nope, SkyActiv is the overall paradigm of building light, strong and efficient. it includes the engine technologies SkyActiv-G, SkyActiv-D and the new, not yet in production SkyActiv-X which are all engine-specific technological applications of the philosophy.

You're right, the new engines did require some structural changes, and Mazda revamped their manufacturing processes at the same time. It was a comeback from making some of the least-fuel efficient engines to some of the most efficient in real-world use.

Bobcat
11-01-2017, 10:34 AM
You're right, the new engines did require some structural changes, and Mazda revamped their manufacturing processes at the same time. It was a comeback from making some of the least-fuel efficient engines to some of the most efficient in real-world use.

I have to say I am impressed with the fuel economy with our Mazda 3. Even with the bigger engine, we got almost 34 mpg for 2500 mile trip. The second half of the trip involved 80 mph speed limit freeways and a number of mountain passes. The mileage on the first half of the trip was even better.

Reynard38
11-01-2017, 11:19 AM
Overall Mazda is sounding pretty good. My Uber ride yesterday was in a Mazda. 87,000 miles and no issues. Driver said he kept his last one to almost 200k and it was still going strong.
Depending on how expensive the house we ar building gets (tile, light fixtures and plumbing get pricey) I might get one in February when the yearly profit sharing check shows up. My wife has decreed, rightly so, that I won't spend any more $$ on my 2001 330i. She's right, it's gotten to that point. My mechanic wants to buy it for his loaner fleet.

Lew Barrett
11-01-2017, 02:00 PM
All three of my daughters own or have owned Mazda 3s. They're good value and reliable. Just like our Miata. We're thinking about buying another one (Miata) for Lindy.