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isla
10-27-2017, 05:44 PM
Sorry about the naff 50s sci-fi title, but it seems we have an interesting visitor from outside our solar system..

A visitor from interstellar space has likely been spotted in our solar system for the first time ever.
The object, known as A/2017 U1, was detected last week by researchers using the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawaii.

https://www.space.com/38580-interstellar-object-spotted-comet-asteroid-mystery.html

A small asteroid or comet that has been spotted racing through our solar system may have come from elsewhere in the galaxy, U.S. space scientists say, possibly marking the first such interstellar visitor observed from Earth.

The mystery object, so far known only as A/2017 U1, was discovered earlier this month by a researcher using a sophisticated telescope system at the University of Hawaii that continually scans the universe for such phenomenon.
"We have been waiting for this day for decades," said Paul Chodas, manager of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Center for Near Earth Object Studies at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.
"It's long been theorized that such objects exist -- asteroids or comets moving around between the stars and occasionally passing through our solar system -- but this is the first such detection," Chodas said.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/10/27/mystery-space-object-may-first-confirmed-interstellar-visitor/

SKIP KILPATRICK
10-27-2017, 06:13 PM
Not an asteroid not a comet!!

Finally, what has taken them so long? I've been phoning home since the early 80s.

Well as we use to say in Old Mexico City. AMF! ( Adios Mother F'ers or Adios My Friend...you can pick the definition that is most appropriate for yourself. )

Chris Smith porter maine
10-27-2017, 06:37 PM
Oh no, we elected Trump and now the rest of the universe is shooting at us. :)

CWSmith
10-27-2017, 06:50 PM
Very cool! I assume the trajectory and speed indicate it's not gravitationally bound to the Sun? I didn't have time to read the article, sorry.

Not to detract from this, and it is very cool, but we have atoms from interstellar space crossing the heliosphere all the time. They are just Hydrogen or Helium atoms, some Oxygen and such. They travel the same distances, but they are just much smaller and can't be seen with telescopes. They are measured, however.

sharpiefan
10-27-2017, 08:46 PM
Very cool! I assume the trajectory and speed indicate it's not gravitationally bound to the Sun? I didn't have time to read the article, sorry.

Not to detract from this, and it is very cool, but we have atoms from interstellar space crossing the heliosphere all the time. They are just Hydrogen or Helium atoms, some Oxygen and such. They travel the same distances, but they are just much smaller and can't be seen with telescopes. They are measured, however.

Hyperbolic trajectory, highly inclined to the ecliptic, 44 km/s

https://regmedia.co.uk/2017/10/26/asteroid.jpg




The 400-metre-wide object – dubbed A/2017 U1 – was first spotted on October 19 after it slingshotted around the Sun. Analysis of itstrajectory suggests it passed beneath Earth's orbit by about 24 million kilometers on October 14. Whatever it is, it's moving: boffins have clocked it at 44 kilometers per second.

Dr Karen Meech, an astronomer with the University of Hawaii, told The Register the object's orbit suggests it is not of this star system. Astro-boffins assign a perfectly circular orbit around the Sun an eccentricity of zero, while an extreme parabolic orbit has a value of one.

This object has been given an eccentricity score of 1.2 – by far the largest ever seen – suggesting it isn't in heliocentric orbit at all but is instead just passing through.

A/2017 U1 also came in on a very unusual path, arriving from well above the plane of the ecliptic and making a very sharp turn as it passed under the Sun.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/10/27/solar_system_gets_first_identified_interstellar_vi sitor_from_another_galaxy/


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CWSmith
10-27-2017, 09:12 PM
Hyperbolic trajectory, highly inclined to the ecliptic, 44 km/s

That's so cool! I'm fairly sure that hyperbolic means it can't be gravitationally bound. I don't do astronomy, but I'm amazed they can determine hyperbolic from elliptical without a lot of data, but I trust they can. 44 km/s is just less than twice the speed of the solar system through the local interstellar medium (about 24 km/s if I remember correctly), although the orbit appears tilted. So that object wasn't moving very fast through the interstellar gas.

That is very cool! The universe just got a lot more interesting. Thanks for posting that.

skuthorp
10-27-2017, 09:16 PM
It's them pesky Vogons again surveying a path for their Hyper-Space Freeway…………….:ycool:

Jim Bow
10-27-2017, 10:05 PM
https://youtu.be/VuPtOtGF4TY

isla
10-28-2017, 03:35 AM
Here's a cool animation of what Sharpiefan posted. The object appears to touch the ecliptic just between Earth and Mars orbits before heading out again.

https://img.purch.com/h/1400/aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zcGFjZS5jb20vaW1hZ2VzL2kvMDAwLzA3MS 8yNjEvb3JpZ2luYWwvaW50ZXJzdGVsbGFyLWNvbWV0LWFzdGVy b2lkLWEyMDE3LXUxLmdpZj8xNTA5MTE2MzAy

isla
10-28-2017, 05:09 AM
So, drifting away from science and back into the realms of SF. Should we now be looking for a smaller object in Earth orbit?

LeeG
10-28-2017, 05:17 AM
Space.com article says it came in at 97km/s leaving at 146km/s

Peerie Maa
10-28-2017, 05:24 AM
Space.com article says it came in at 97km/s leaving at 146km/s

Sling shot effect.
Does that mean that the solar system is now moving in the opposite direction to its exit trajectory?

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-28-2017, 08:24 AM
It's not coming back anytime soon.

sharpiefan
10-28-2017, 09:59 AM
Space.com article says it came in at 97km/s leaving at 146km/s


Space.com Article (LINK) (https://www.space.com/38580-interstellar-object-spotted-comet-asteroid-mystery.html)




Astronomers have reconstructed A/2017 U1's path through our solar system, using their knowledge of the object's orbit. Thought to be less than 1,300 feet (400 meters) wide, A/2017 approached from the direction of the constellation Lyra, screaming through space at nearly 57,000 mph (92,000 km/h).

A/2017 U1 came in nearly perpendicular to the ecliptic, the plane in which the eight major planets orbit. The object crossed that plane on Sept. 2 inside the orbit of Mercury, then made its closest pass by the sun a week later.

A/2017 U1 made its closest approach to Earth on Oct. 14, coming within 15 million miles (24 million kilometers) of us -- about 60 times the Earth-moon distance. The object is now above the ecliptic and rocketing toward the outer solar system at about 97,200 mph (156,400 km/h) relative to the sun, in the direction of the constellation Pegasus, researchers said




velocity (km/h) divided by 3600 (number of seconds/hr) = velocity (km/s)

92 000 km/hr = 25.555 km/s
157 400 km/hr = 43.444 km/s

Solar System escape velocity at 1 AU (Earth/Moon distance from The Sun) = 42.1 km/s
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escape_velocity

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JimD
10-28-2017, 10:58 AM
Maybe it's the cosmic beaver

https://scontent-sea1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/22814342_1492034794206595_7465869788529069929_n.jp g?oh=2a5f6d1480f16104cadbdbe1083cde72&oe=5A79EF21

isla
11-21-2017, 05:05 AM
An asteroid that visited us from interstellar space is one of the most elongated cosmic objects known to science, a study has shown.
Discovered on 19 October, the object's speed and trajectory strongly suggested it originated in a planetary system around another star.
Astronomers have been scrambling to observe the unique space rock, known as 'Oumuamua, before it fades from view.

Their results so far suggest it is at least 10 times longer than it is wide.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-42053634

skuthorp
11-21-2017, 05:17 AM
Damn tourists…………...

WX
11-21-2017, 05:29 AM
It's not coming back anytime soon.

It's not going anywhere soon either.

Paul Pless
11-21-2017, 07:09 AM
Maybe it's the cosmic beaver

now there's an interesting concept. . .

oh, wait!

Dave Hadfield
11-21-2017, 07:41 AM
Rendezvous With Rama?

sharpiefan
11-21-2017, 08:16 AM
Rendezvous With Rama?

/* Could be. :) */

https://cdn.arstechnica.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/1I_eso_artistimpression-800x500.jpg

Image:An artist’s impression of the oddly shaped interstellar asteroid `Oumuamua.
ESO/M. Kornmesser


First-known interstellar visitor is a bizarre, cigar-shaped asteroid (ARTICLE LINK) (https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/11/first-known-interstellar-visitor-is-a-bizarre-cigar-shaped-asteroid/)




Excerpt

Since mid-October, the astronomy community has been buzzing about what might be our Solar System’s first confirmed interstellar visitor. An automated telescope spotted an object that appeared as if it had been dropped on the Solar System from above, an angle that suggests it arrived from elsewhere. Now, a team of astronomers has rushed out a paper that describes the object's odd properties and gives it the name “1I/2017 U1 ‘Oumuamua.” In Hawaiian, ‘Oumuamua roughly means “first messenger,” and the 1I indicates that it’s the first interstellar object.


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SKIP KILPATRICK
11-21-2017, 08:56 AM
Does Bill Clinton know w about the bizzare cigar shaped object?

And when did Hillary know.

Gerarddm
11-21-2017, 09:16 AM
Looks like biggest doobie ever.

RHAKCT
11-21-2017, 09:23 AM
​it's here looking for the whales...

skuthorp
11-21-2017, 02:35 PM
It'a a camouflaged Vogon spaceship……….

Ralphie Boy
11-21-2017, 03:39 PM
Come on you guys, stop messing around!

Is is obviously the planet Niburu!

Ralphie

WX
11-21-2017, 04:00 PM
Come on you guys, stop messing around!

Is is obviously the planet Niburu!

Ralphie
Isn’t it a bit small?:)