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Glen Longino
10-27-2017, 09:43 AM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gault_(archaeological_site)

Interesting and close to my home...

amish rob
10-27-2017, 09:50 AM
Awesome.

Peace,
Robert

Peerie Maa
10-27-2017, 09:59 AM
Just watched this:

he Incredible Human Journey (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00klf6j)

For Stone Age people, reaching North and South America seems impossible - on each side vast oceans, and to the north an impenetrable ice sheet that covered the whole of Canada. So how did the first Americans get there?
Dr Alice Roberts discovers evidence for an ancient corridor through the Canadian ice sheet that may have allowed those first people through. But there are problems - in particular some very ancient finds in southern Chile seem to suggest a very different way in to the Americas. Amazingly, an ancient human skull discovered in Brazil even points to an Australasian origin of the Americans. Could a route from Australia across the Pacific have been possible? A surprising answer to the problem eventually comes from a Canadian forensic scientist more used to solving murder cases.

There is genetic evidence that the first "first people" came down the coast wayy before the Clovis people, supported by cave art as well as other archaeological finds.

David W Pratt
10-27-2017, 11:45 AM
I thought this was going to be about Ayn Rand

Keith Wilson
10-27-2017, 11:52 AM
Glen, if you like this kind of thing, you might be interested in the Monte Verde site, near Puerto Montt in southern Chile (http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2015/11/oldest-stone-tools-americas-claimed-chile). It's a LONG way from the Bering Strait, and it's been reliably dated at around 18,500 years old. There's still a lot we don't know about early human settlement in the Americans.

Peerie Maa
10-27-2017, 12:00 PM
Glen, if you like this kind of thing, you might be interested in the Monte Verde site, near Puerto Montt in southern Chile. It's a LONG way from the Bering Straits, and it's been reliably dated at 18,500 years old. There's still a lot we don't know about early human settlement in the Americans.

The hardest question is how they made the journey from Asia to America when the land was locked in ice. It is proposed that the second wave of "first people" came through an ice free corridor that opened up and then closed again behind them, but the first "first people" must have been coastal seafarers like today's Inuit races, relying on hunting sea life as they migrated around the ice margins.

Glen Longino
10-27-2017, 12:41 PM
Glen, if you like this kind of thing, you might be interested in the Monte Verde site, near Puerto Montt in southern Chile (http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2015/11/oldest-stone-tools-americas-claimed-chile). It's a LONG way from the Bering Strait, and it's been reliably dated at around 18,500 years old. There's still a lot we don't know about early human settlement in the Americans.

Thanks, Keith...I am familiar with that site. It's notable how recently some of these sites have been found, such as Clovis in New Mexico, I think, the 1930s.
I wish I could hang around this world another hundred years to see what turns up. In another way, I'd leave today if I had a free ticket!:)

Glen Longino
10-27-2017, 01:01 PM
I thought this was going to be about Ayn Rand

Galt is more archaic than Gault, David!:)