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PeterSibley
10-10-2017, 05:08 PM
Plastic ! Bloody plastic ! I think the world is going to drown in the stuff..... or at least choke the oceans with it. I stopped on the highway yesterday in 2 places and over 100 meters in each place picked up a fertiliser bag of plastic sheet, plastic cups, bottles, styro foam, unidentifiable crap, McDonald's straws and packaging.
200 m of roadside = 2 fertilizer bags full of plastic and it will all end up in the river if someone doesn't collect it !

skuthorp
10-10-2017, 05:16 PM
Humans, as a species, are not planet friendly. And certainly no friend to most other species. But rats and cockroaches seem to do OK, funny that eh?

The Bigfella
10-10-2017, 05:18 PM
Plastic ! Bloody plastic ! I think the world is going to drown in the stuff..... or at least choke the oceans with it. I stopped on the highway yesterday in 2 places and over 100 meters in each place picked up a fertiliser bag of plastic sheet, plastic cups, bottles, styro foam, unidentifiable crap, McDonald's straws and packaging.
200 m of roadside = 2 fertilizer bags full of plastic and it will all end up in the river !

Don't do that. Why would you put it in the river? Take it to the landfill.

Phil Y
10-10-2017, 05:20 PM
And then there's the fertiliser too. No wonder the reef is shot.

mmd
10-10-2017, 05:22 PM
In our area there is an "Adopt A Highway" program wherein various charitable groups and/or boys/girls groups such as Boy Scouts walk a stretch of road (usually about 5 kms) and pick up all the accreted trash. They turn in the recyclable stuff for the refund value as a fund-raiser for their organization. I have helped the 4-H crowd at this, driving the kids around and picking up the garbage in my pickup truck. We have had a pretty vigorous governmental "Don't Litter" program complete with $200 fines for littering for over twenty years or more, but still the kids pick up six or eight truckloads of litter in 10 kms per year. At least, back in the Dark Ages when fast food outlets used paper cups and trays, the stuff was biodegradable. What pisses me off are plastic water bottles - no refund value, so highly discard-able.

PeterSibley
10-10-2017, 05:29 PM
I bring the stuff home and sort it, recyclables into that bin but the mass of it goes into a council skip..... there's too much for my domestic bin.

lupussonic
10-10-2017, 06:19 PM
Good on ya Peter.

Years ago ago I was in Brasil on a snorkel boat with a dozen white collar NGO Eco types, we came into a bay where the sea was choked full of plastic crap, for about 30 meters from the shore, 200 meters long. Several cruise liners were anchored off it. As we came in I suggested that if we all spent half an hour each picking it all out of the water we'd have it clean in no time. They all agreed enthusiastically, then when we landed they ALL scarpered. Couldn't believe it. I spent 6 hours doing it in my own, then loaded it all onto the boat; took it back and disposed of it properly. Twats.

paulf
10-10-2017, 07:19 PM
In our area there is an "Adopt A Highway" program wherein various charitable groups and/or boys/girls groups such as Boy Scouts walk a stretch of road (usually about 5 kms) and pick up all the accreted trash. They turn in the recyclable stuff for the refund value as a fund-raiser for their organization. I have helped the 4-H crowd at this, driving the kids around and picking up the garbage in my pickup truck. We have had a pretty vigorous governmental "Don't Litter" program complete with $200 fines for littering for over twenty years or more, but still the kids pick up six or eight truckloads of litter in 10 kms per year. At least, back in the Dark Ages when fast food outlets used paper cups and trays, the stuff was biodegradable. What pisses me off are plastic water bottles - no refund value, so highly discard-able.

We have a lot of volunteers, and the Clallam County Sheriffs dept CHAIN GANG. They collect TONS literally, of crap off the highways and forests and beaches here.

http://videos.usatoday.net/Brightcove2/29906170001/2013/05/29906170001_2346693131001_video-still-for-video-2345544867001.jpghttps://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5041/5309842649_00da096030_b.jpg

carioca1232001
10-10-2017, 08:17 PM
With Richard Thaler winning the Nobel Prize in Economics for his work in Behavioural Economics, I extricated the following from a newspaper blog:

"If the Swachh Bharat campaign wants people to stop littering it should provide plenty of handy waste bins. To encourage people to stop open defecation make sure clean toilets with adequate water supply are thick on the ground. In general banning and strong-arm strategies are not the smartest solutions. The nudge may go much further than the bulldozer."

So with people in developed nations who carelessly toss plastic and bio-degradable waste wherever they please; educating them to do otherwise will go a long way to ensure that this nasty practice ceases.

https://blogs.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/toi-editorials/nudge-for-good-nobel-for-richard-thaler-reminds-economics-that-people-are-human/

Phil Y
10-10-2017, 10:24 PM
South Australia has for many years had a deposit scheme on drink bottles, even includes flavoured milk cartons. Seems to work well, and hasnt destroyed the industry either. 10Cent refund.

PeterSibley
10-10-2017, 11:21 PM
It's a great thing and used to fund my boyhood jaunts in SA but the packaging lobby has proven too generous for other state's pollies to resist.

carioca1232001
10-11-2017, 12:05 PM
South Australia has for many years had a deposit scheme on drink bottles, even includes flavoured milk cartons. Seems to work well, and hasnt destroyed the industry either. 10Cent refund.

The deposit and subsequent refund are symbolic in monetary terms.

There could be more to it than just this, which is the central argument in Richard Thalerīs behavioural economics.

varadero
10-11-2017, 11:06 PM
Just in the news today that 88-95% of the plastic in the oceans comes from just 10 rivers. Yangtze, Indus, Yellow, Hai He, Nile, Amur, Niger, and Mekong. Half the plastic in the oceans come from 5 countries, China, Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam, and Sri Lanka. The only industrialised Western country in the top 20 is the USA, at number 20.

PeterSibley
10-11-2017, 11:26 PM
https://cosmos-images2.imgix.net/file/spina/photo/12254/171012-Yangtze-full.jpg?ixlib=rails-2.1.4&auto=format&ch=Width%2CDPR&fit=max&w=835

The heavily polluted Yangtze river pumps massive amounts of plastic into the ocean every year.
https://cosmosmagazine.com/biology/just-10-rivers-to-blame-for-millions-of-tonnes-of-ocean-plastic

varadero
10-12-2017, 12:04 AM
Hi Peter, I am in Brisbane at the moment, where are you, close?

PeterSibley
10-12-2017, 12:08 AM
About 120 km South of Brisbane, just across the NSW border.

varadero
10-12-2017, 12:11 AM
May pop down for a wee dram, will pm.

skuthorp
10-12-2017, 12:18 AM
Hey, a dram indeed! Wish I was closer.
I'll have one tonight in solidarity!

PeterSibley
10-12-2017, 12:19 AM
I'll be thinking of you Jeff ! :D

john welsford
10-12-2017, 01:54 AM
I've "adopted" the estuary that I live on, row about a 5 km stretch two or three times a week picking up any trash that I come across. The local city fathers provide me with a bundle of pre paid rubbish collection bags every six months or so so I can get rid of it. Its interesting, there has been a lot of pressure here to get supermarkets to stop bagging at the checkout with single use plastic bags, and two major chains have just announced that they'll stop using them within the next few months.
Interestingly I've never, in three years doing this, picked one of those bags out of the water, the major source of the trash is drinks bottles. Soft drinks, Coke etc and water bottles would be around half of what I collect by weight, the rest being packaging, polystyrene and other foams, and oddly enough disposable diapers which have to have been tossed off a bridge which would require a very deliberate action.

I found a body once, but he would have decomposed without causing any real harm to the environment.

John Welsford

PeterSibley
10-12-2017, 01:57 AM
Good show John.

john welsford
10-12-2017, 01:58 AM
About 120 km South of Brisbane, just across the NSW border.

I've rellys in Cawongla, anywhere near you?

John Welsford

lupussonic
10-12-2017, 02:22 AM
Heard about plastic cleaning contraptions called Seabins last night on the radio. Can't post link, but could be very good at cleaning up our seas...

PeterSibley
10-12-2017, 02:26 AM
http://seabinproject.com/

varadero
10-12-2017, 02:37 AM
I have recently visited some of the remotest locations on the planet, never yet been to a beach, except a manicured resort, where there has not been the ubiquitous plastic water bottle. Never.

PeterSibley
10-12-2017, 02:41 AM
Kuta Beach in Bali.

http://indosurflife.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/ST_20160217_BIGPIC17_2070758.jpg

doorstop
10-12-2017, 02:49 AM
My mate's son has invented this and is taking it to the world. Might help a little.

http://seabinproject.com/

PeterSibley
10-12-2017, 03:36 AM
See 24 above mate .

PeterSibley
10-12-2017, 03:41 AM
Something I'd like to see on a lot of rivers !
https://www.voanews.com/a/water-wheel-picks-up-trash-in-baltimores-waterways/1957539.html

m2c1Iw
10-12-2017, 04:42 AM
Something I'd like to see on a lot of rivers !
https://www.voanews.com/a/water-wheel-picks-up-trash-in-baltimores-waterways/1957539.html

What a great thing we could use one on the Torrens

PeterSibley
10-12-2017, 04:47 AM
Send the link to the mayor !

carioca1232001
10-12-2017, 01:52 PM
Seabin seems to have considerable potential, although powering it up with 110/220 V AC is scary (they claim they have tried 12 V DC but it hasnīt performed well)

The water wheel is pretty brilliant too for cleanup on a larger scale; but as they themselves admit, society has to come to terms with not littering the city.

PeterSibley
10-17-2017, 08:36 PM
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jun/27/plastic-debris-inundates-remote-uk-coasts-endangering-wildlife

Plastic debris inundates remote UK coasts endangering wildlife




A Greenpeace research expedition into plastic waste finds devastating pollution on Scottish beaches and seabird colonies


https://www.greenpeace.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Mull-beach.jpg



Kilninian beach, Isle of Mull, Scotland. Marine scientists are analysing the plastic found on the Greenpeace expedition to assess the impact of the waste. Photograph: Will Rose/Greenpeace
Matthew Taylor (https://www.theguardian.com/profile/matthewtaylor)
Tuesday 27 June 2017 19.28 AESTFirst published on Tuesday 27 June 201715.55 AEST

Plastic bottles and packaging are overrunning some of the UK’s most beautiful beaches and remote coastline, endangering wildlife from basking sharks to puffins.
A Greenpeace (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/greenpeace) research ship has spent the past two months touring the Scottish coast and islands assessing the impact of plastic waste.
Marine scientists on the Greenpeace ship Beluga II will undertake a detailed analysis of the results over the next two months. But the initial findings from the voyage paint a bleak picture:
cean plastic pollution in Scotland – in pictur

View gallery



Plastic waste, from bottles to bags and packaging, was found on every beach surveyed.



Microplastic and other plastic fragments were found in the feeding grounds of basking sharks, seals and whales.



Plastic bottles, bags and packaging were found in birds’ nests at internationally significant seabird colonies, in areas such as the Bass Rock, Isle of May and the Shiant Isles.

The findings follow a series of recent reports that highlight the growing problem of plastics pollution in oceans around the world.

Last month scientists found nearly 18 tonnes of plastic on one of the world’s most remote islands, an uninhabited coral atoll in the South Pacific (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/may/15/38-million-pieces-of-plastic-waste-found-on-uninhabited-south-pacific-island).

The tiny landmass in the eastern South Pacific, was found to have the highest density of anthropogenic debris recorded anywhere in the world, with 99.8% of the pollution plastic.
Another study of remote Arctic beaches found they were also heavily polluted with plastic, despite small local populations (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jun/16/plastic-polluted-arctic-islands-are-dumping-ground-for-gulf-stream).


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On Tuesday the Beluga II is due to arrive in Edinburgh. Tisha Brown, oceans campaigner at Greenpeace, described the initial findings as shocking.
“It cannot be right that our beaches, seas and the stunning wildlife they are home to should become the final dumping ground for throwaway plastic bottles and other plastic trash.”
She said “a truckload” of plastic was entering the world’s oceans every minute.
“We need urgent action from governments and from major soft drinks companies which produce billions of single-use plastic bottles every year, like Coca-Cola (https://www.theguardian.com/business/cocacola), to stop the flow of plastic into the sea.”
Campaigners in Scotland will deliver a petition to Scotland’s environment secretary Roseanna Cunningham on Tuesday calling for the introduction of a deposit return scheme for drinks containers in Scotland (https://www.theguardian.com/uk/scotland). Similar schemes have been shown to increase collection rates of plastic bottles to as much as 95% in other countries, drastically reducing the number ending up in the environment.

https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/d51185f462fb5f2d43496b9aa1382f63c26ad70c/0_98_2954_1773/master/2954.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&
38 million pieces of plastic waste found on uninhabited South Pacific island

The Greenpeace expedition assessed plastic pollution in sites of scientific importance and biodiversity, including Bass Rock, Gunna Sound, Mull, Rųm, Eigg, Skye, and the Shiant Isles in the Outer Hebrides.
The charity said the extent of the plastic pollution they found was “a shocking testament to our throwaway culture”.

Brown added: “We ... witnessed plastic pollution in the beaks of puffins, in the waters where basking sharks feed, and even wrapped around the beak of an emaciated gannet. We found plastic bottle tops, bags, packaging, bits of old fishing gear and even crisp packets strewn across the island and surrounding eggs in nests. It’s no wonder that studies have shown that 90% of seabirds have eaten plastic.”
But she said it was not too late to “preserve these remote shores and the wildlife they are home to”.
“We need urgent action from governments and from major soft drinks companies which produce billions of single-use plastic bottles every year.”

Ralphie Boy
10-18-2017, 12:21 AM
Plastic is one of my pet peeves. Sure, it's incredibly useful, but the pollution is getting out of hand. That picture of Kura Beach, above, is so sad.

I'm an engineer, and when I was in design I used to read a lot of Industry publications. Every month they would feature new plastics and coatings that had been created to solve some industry niche, but how about developing some good biodegradable materials that we could phase in to replace all the PE, Nylon, etc. ? This is where government needs to step in and provide laws to eventually stop using these materials.

My city does not allow single use grocery bags to be provided by the store, if you want a bag you have to purchase it. I'm not sure how much it helps with pollution, but Inlike the law, and don't think it's a hassle to bring reusable bags.

I have a theory on the litter along the highways here. You hardly ever see anyone actually litter, especially since there's a ($500 IIRC) fine, but still see trash along the freeways, mostly junk food wrappers. I think it is all due to pickup trucks. You've got someone who goes to lunch every day, eats his burger, and then throws the trash in the truck bed. Somehow by the end of the week most of the trash is mysteriously gone...

PeterSibley
10-18-2017, 03:59 AM
A lot of what I collect is packaging, polystyrene foam, plastic sheet and strapping but the majority remains the ubicquitous drink and pop bottles.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-18-2017, 04:40 AM
A lot of what I collect is packaging, polystyrene foam, plastic sheet and strapping but the majority remains the ubicquitous drink and pop bottles.

PET pop bottles go Ģ350 per ton.

PeterSibley
10-18-2017, 05:44 AM
10p each ? Do you have deposits on containers ?

PeterSibley
10-28-2017, 02:29 AM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/10/26/shocking-photo-shows-caribbean-sea-choked-death-human-waste/?WT.mc_id=tmgoff_fetch_&utm_source=social&utm_medium=fetch&utm_campaign=qne

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/content/dam/news/2017/10/26/22499028_10155101847253861_6973542954797692233_o_t rans_NvBQzQNjv4BqqVzuuqpFlyLIwiB6NTmJwfSVWeZ_vEN7c 6bHu2jJnT8.jpg?imwidth=450

PeterSibley
11-16-2017, 04:26 PM
Whale found dying off coast of Norway with 30 plastic bags in its stomach


Helena Horton (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/helena-horton/)


3 FEBRUARY 2017 • 10:17AM
Scientists in Norway found more than 30 plastic bags and other plastic waste inside the stomach of a whale stranded off the coast.
Wardens had put the whale down after realising it wasn't going to live, and had clearly consumed a large amount of non-biodegradable waste.
Despite the huge volume of plastic clogging up the whale's stomach, the fact it died from ingesting the waste was "not surprising", said researchers, as the volume of plastic in our seas continues to grow.












(http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/02/03/whale-found-dying-coast-norway-30-plastic-bags-stomach/#)


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/content/dam/video_previews/5/t/5tbgflote6e979ebdba4iqkmw1kymslh.jpg?imwidth=450Wh ale dies with over 30 plastic bags in its stomach
[CENTER]01:03

The Cuvier's beaked whale was found stranded in shallow waters off the island of Sotra, and was in such poor condition the wardens decided to put it down.
The creature had very little blubber and was emaciated, suggesting the plastic had lead it to become malnourished.
Dr Terje Lislevand, a zoologist who studied the whale, said: "The whale's stomach was full of plastic bags and packaging with labels in Danish and English."
He also said the intestines were probably blocked up with plastic, causing severe pain.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/02/03/whale-found-dying-coast-norway-30-plastic-bags-stomach/

PeterSibley
11-16-2017, 04:29 PM
At a glance | Plastic in our seas


Every year, millions of tonnes of plastic debris such as bags, bottles and food packaging seeps into our oceans
As plastic degrades slowly, it pollutes the oceans for a long time
It breaks down into fragments called micro-plastics, which are ingested by sea life
It can badly affect living organisms as they become entangled in or injest it, and they can become choked or poisoned
Researchers estimate the amount of plastic in the ocean is set to increase ten-fold by 2020
And there could be more plastic than life in our seas by 2050

Peerie Maa
11-16-2017, 04:49 PM
Even at 36,000 Feet Deep, Ocean Creatures Have Plastic in Their Guts https://www.livescience.com/60954-plastic-found-in-deepest-living-creatures.html


A new study finds that crustaceans dwelling at the bottom of the 36,000-foot-deep (10,970 meters) trench have microplastics in their guts. In fact, across six deep-ocean trenches in the Pacific, not one was free of plastic contamination (https://www.livescience.com/37250-trash-found-deep-ocean.html), the researchers reported today (Nov. 15).
"Litter discarded into the oceans will ultimately end up washed back ashore or sinking to the deep-sea," study leader Alan Jamieson, a marine ecologist at Newcastle University in the United Kingdom, said in a statement (http://www.ncl.ac.uk/press/news/2017/11/plasticocean/). "There are no other options."

robm
11-16-2017, 05:26 PM
I've never, in three years doing this, picked one of those bags out of the water, the major source of the trash is drinks bottles.

You probably don't see the bags, as they tend to float just under the surface, where they are ideally placed to wrap themselves around an outboard leg and cover the cooling water inlet. Everything else you mentioned picking up floats high in the water.

Vince Brennan
11-16-2017, 06:36 PM
Gaia is only gonna take so much from the parasites.

PeterSibley
11-16-2017, 07:42 PM
You probably don't see the bags, as they tend to float just under the surface, where they are ideally placed to wrap themselves around an outboard leg and cover the cooling water inlet. Everything else you mentioned picking up floats high in the water.

The main reason fishing boats here mainly have keel cooling .

Plastic bags also look like jelly fish and animals that eat jelly fish are in serious trouble.