PDA

View Full Version : Wood stove deck iron question



jkelety
10-20-2000, 09:25 PM
Hi Folks -

Anyone have an opinion on the best type of deck iron for a wood stove application? I have procured a Washington Stoveworks Skippy for my Folkboat and need to come to a decision on the through-cabin top fitting. I have seen the simple, aluminium deck irons without any "bowl" and the more traditional bronze bowl shaped deck iorn that is supposed to catch water to help dissipate the heat. Anyone thinks it matters which way to go?

Appreciate the input.

Jeff

ACB
10-21-2000, 01:41 AM
Well, here's two pennyworth.

I have a Shipmate Skippy (is that the same stove? - I know that Shipmate have given up, alas).

I think the best system is to use the bowl shaped deck iron, but NOT to rely on it. I recommend fitting the flue straight through the deck fitting, caulking the space with insulation (I would once have written "asbestos string" but you know the stuff I mean!) and stopping the pipe about a foot off the deck so you can remove the head, which should be a loose sliding fit on it.

If at anchor, put water in the ring (nb - use fresh, it does not take much, and the rate of corrosion is reduced!) but if under way the water cannot stay in of course. The water in the ring is a useful extra safety measure if you want to leave the stove in over night or leave the boat for a bit without worrying. I was taught this by someone else, during my liveaboard period, and I have been happy with the results.

Ian McColgin
10-21-2000, 07:08 AM
The waterholding type is best but Grana has a simple air space arrangement with out flange to keep it from leaking. Air space is about an inch all around and that seems adequate.

jkelety
10-21-2000, 10:30 AM
Thanks all. I had already been advised about the 1" space in the cabin top exit. But Ian, I'm afraid I don't understand the following reference:

<but Grana has a simple air space arrangement with out flange to keep it from leaking>

Is Grana a company that supplies bronze deck irons? Do you have their contact information?

Thanks.

jkelety
10-21-2000, 10:34 AM
Oh, and the Washington Stoveworks "Skippy" is an old two burner cast iron piece. Sort of oval, pot bellied shape. Washington Stoveworks has been out of business for some time. I was grateful to pick this one up recently at our local marine exchange in Port Townsend. Does that match your "Shipmate Skippy"?

Jeff

Ian McColgin
10-21-2000, 11:28 AM
Grana is the affectionate diminuative of my schooner's name, Granuaile - spelled and misspelled many ways by the Irish themselves.

I was going to put her name in the english "Grace O'Malley" but that was too long for the trailboards I'd already made - always do the layout before you cut the wood they say, but I cut it and I cut it and it's still too short. Anyway, when I told Mother that she'd be called Granuaile rather than Grace O'Malley, Mother gave her best Wellsley Hills snif and said, "Good. I always thought Grace O'Malley was the name of someone's cook.

To the deck iron, or more like deck ss sheat metal - It's about a 3" high thing - 3" diameter hole to recieve chimney pipe and it's cone shape such that the base of the cone is about 5" diameter and has another inch or so of flat flange to cover some more deck. From the inside, there should be a trim flange of ss and I lined the hole in the deck (5"d) with ss but I doubt that's needed. So, lots of air space and the above deck cone gives a place for cooler air to form and descend past the hole in the deck.

jkelety
10-21-2000, 11:56 AM
<Grana is the affectionate diminuative of my schooner's name, Granuaile - spelled and misspelled many ways by the Irish themselves. >

I see.

<Mother gave her best Wellsley Hills snif...>

Well, you can't say she doesn't have an opinion <g>.

Jeff

Bob Cleek
10-21-2000, 03:34 PM
ABI Industries, Petaluma, CA (Advertisers in WB) have a nice stainless steel one. Probably reasonably priced. Most of their stuff is. Hard to come by these days, durnit!

Jon Agne
10-22-2000, 08:02 AM
Port Townsend Foundry 360-385-6425

I believe Pete makes these along with a ton of other bronze hardware items. If you are ever in Port Townsend, this is a MUST SEE.

New Found Metals 360-385-3315

This is the other place in the US that might be able to help you.

Also try Lunenburg Foundry in Nova Scotia. Very helpful. 902-634-8827

Jon

jkelety
10-22-2000, 10:44 AM
Thanks, Jon and Bob.

Actually, Jon, I am from Port Townsend and had considered calling Pete, though I hadn't rushed into it because I thought all his stuff was custom made (i.e. pricey and takes a long time). But I'll give a call and see what's available.

Jon Agne
10-22-2000, 08:29 PM
I'm from Maine, and I would love to have someone "just down the road" with the abilities of Pete Langley. Drop by and look at his patterns, he may have exactly what you want. No, he's not cheap, but you probably get your money's worth!

Best,

Jon

ACB
10-22-2000, 10:09 PM
If my "Skippy" is not the same stove it's a close relative! Alas, close to rusting out, after 15 years, so it does not owe me anything, and the search for a replacement is now starting. The ability to cook on the top is surprisingly useful.

One more suggestion - put some sheet stainless, with a cut out for the flue in it, backed by some "not asbestos but you know what I mean board" under the deck, above the stove. Otherwise the deckhead discolors and any seams in it open and leak because they are getting dried out from below by heat from the stove. This is another very good trick that I was taught.

noquiklos
10-23-2000, 12:09 AM
No, Pete's not cheap, but he's competitive, and a lot faster than you'd think. He's also accumulated an awful lot of patterns over the years, so he may have what you need. Can't hurt to give him a call, as he's always been extremely helpful to me, even if I wasn't buying anything.
Peace,
Roy

jkelety
10-23-2000, 10:32 AM
<Otherwise the deckhead discolors and any seams in it open and leak because they are getting dried out from below by heat from the stove. This is another very good trick that I was taught.>

Well, that seems reasonable, though one fellow who has a single burner woodstove felt that the heat was not so great from these stoves and overhead shielding was not necessary. But I'd hate to see the cabin deck go to heck cause of the heat, particularly since it's canvas covered. From an asthetic point of view, I am reluctant to cover up more wood than I have to.

Art Read
10-23-2000, 10:49 AM
Ian... (off topic) I KNOW that "sniff..." Spent four years @ Babson... Went to Boston to have "fun"... ;-}