PDA

View Full Version : Violent Crime - perception vs. reality



David G
09-29-2017, 09:10 PM
Behind the ‘paradox of fear’: Crime is down, but many Americans don’t feel safe

https://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Justice/2017/0929/Behind-the-paradox-of-fear-Crime-is-down-but-many-Americans-don-t-feel-safe?cmpid=FB

CWSmith
09-29-2017, 10:01 PM
many Americans don’t feel safe

I'd feel safer with fewer guns in public. Only that and being stopped by a cop really makes me feel unsafe.

ishmael
09-30-2017, 05:45 AM
"Dog bites man, no headline. Man bites dog, headline."

I've always attributed that the H.L. Mencken, but a closer looks shows the attribution is uncertain. Nevertheless, it does seem a good aphorism to describe much of journalistic emphasis.

Good on the Monitor for taking a closer look.

Whether or not one feels safer or less so these days undoubtedly depends on where you live. One never knows for sure when the vagaries of life might bring violence into your life, but if you live in a neighborhood with drugs gang violence as opposed to a quiet suburb or a rural area...well, there is a constant threat of violence.

Guns...nah, I'm not going there again.;)

I also think people's fear of violence is a part of the temper of the time. Perceived political instability - a general feeling of things coming apart - isn't contributing to a sense of safety in the country! Add in a human tendency, amplified by the web, of constructing an echo chamber around oneself, of only paying attention to what reinforces your prejudices, and it doesn't surprise me that people are uneasy.

David G
09-30-2017, 09:54 AM
"Dog bites man, no headline. Man bites dog, headline."

I've always attributed that the H.L. Mencken, but a closer looks shows the attribution is uncertain. Nevertheless, it does seem a good aphorism to describe much of journalistic emphasis.

Good on the Monitor for taking a closer look.

Whether or not one feels safer or less so these days undoubtedly depends on where you live. One never knows for sure when the vagaries of life might bring violence into your life, but if you live in a neighborhood with drugs gang violence as opposed to a quiet suburb or a rural area...well, there is a constant threat of violence.

Guns...nah, I'm not going there again.;)

I also think people's fear of violence is a part of the temper of the time. Perceived political instability - a general feeling of things coming apart - isn't contributing to a sense of safety in the country! Add in a human tendency, amplified by the web, of constructing an echo chamber around oneself, of only paying attention to what reinforces your prejudices, and it doesn't surprise me that people are uneasy.

It also takes a while for changes - even improvements - to be noted and incorporated. Once a narrative takes hold... particularly if its continually refueled by 'if it bleeds, it leads' media, and ideologically-driven scaremongering propaganda.

skuthorp
09-30-2017, 03:56 PM
Commercial TV in particular has an interest in playing up violent crime, bad news sells even if the balance is not there.
And a diet of crime fiction and murder doesn't help either. How many TV murders a week are there? It just increases the perception.

mdh
09-30-2017, 11:14 PM
Commercial TV in particular has an interest in playing up violent crime, bad news sells even if the balance is not there.
And a diet of crime fiction and murder doesn't help either. How many TV murders a week are there? It just increases the perception.

Unless you live in St. Louis or Chicago: then the daily news may be exasperating.

Stiletto
10-01-2017, 02:23 AM
I have always been a bit surprised by Americans citing home protection as a reason for gun ownership. None of the Americans I've met have ever actually needed to use any home protection of that type whatsoever. I have no figures, but get a gut feeling that the actual need is probably not much different from here in NZ.
Having said that, since having my shed burgled last year, I think I should have the right to shoot the waste of space a__holes without any legal recourse against me. We have had a spate of convenience store owners being held up by machete weilding youths, and the police discourage the proprieters from even having a baseball bat under the counter! My feeling now is that a few robber's corpses might reduce the rate of attacks somewhat.

skuthorp
10-01-2017, 02:30 AM
Back in the late 1950's my grandfather was losing stock to thieves and one night disabled their vehicle with a double barrelled express rifle designed to shoot elephants. After a complicated wash up it turned out the thieves were local police.

Peerie Maa
10-01-2017, 06:20 AM
I have always been a bit surprised by Americans citing home protection as a reason for gun ownership. None of the Americans I've met have ever actually needed to use any home protection of that type whatsoever. I have no figures, but get a gut feeling that the actual need is probably not much different from here in NZ.
Having said that, since having my shed burgled last year, I think I should have the right to shoot the waste of space a__holes without any legal recourse against me. We have had a spate of convenience store owners being held up by machete weilding youths, and the police discourage the proprieters from even having a baseball bat under the counter! My feeling now is that a few robber's corpses might reduce the rate of attacks somewhat.

There is the principle of reasonable force. Defending your self against a blade by using a club would be OK, but chasing a fleeing thief and blattering the back of their head would not be.


A comparison of recent cases in which burglars were shot demonstrates that each case must be judged on its own facts.
As was reported yesterday, Kenneth Faulkner, 73, a retired quantity surveyor from Derbyshire, was not prosecuted for firing a shotgun at John Rae, 22, a burglar who had previously stolen shotguns from his gun cabinet. Mr Faulkner wrongly, though understandably, believed that Rae was armed and fired, leaving Rae with shotgun wounds to his leg.
The CPS decision not to prosecute, approved by the judge who sentenced Rae to prison on Monday, appears to have been based on the assessment that the degree of force used by Mr Faulkner was reasonable in the circumstances, and could therefore be regarded as self-defence.

from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1475141/Definition-of-reasonable-force-is-calculated-in-each-individual-case.html

Paul Pless
10-01-2017, 08:22 AM
I have always been a bit surprised by Americans citing home protection as a reason for gun ownership.

its a lie, 'needing a gun for home protection'

you never see these people going to home security alarm conventions

you never see these people posting selfies on face book standing behind a security door

https://www.thenation.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/gun_show_2015_ap_img.jpg

Too Little Time
10-01-2017, 10:08 AM
As https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/national/crime-rates-by-county/ shows many people have valid fears.

ron ll
10-01-2017, 10:09 AM
A bundle of firecrackers dropped in one of those conventions might thin the ranks a bit. Just make sure there is a long enough fuse to get some distance.

SKIP KILPATRICK
10-01-2017, 01:56 PM
Unless you live in St. Louis or Chicago: then the daily news may be exasperating.


Ive started a go-fund-me page to by you a clue!

mdh
10-01-2017, 02:13 PM
Ive started a go-fund-me page to by you a clue!

Send it to Gonzo

David G
10-01-2017, 03:04 PM
Ive started a go-fund-me page to by you a clue!

I've looked into this. There are currently no clues available that are of sufficient intensity and gravity to penetrate such a barrier. Scientists are not hopeful...