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sharpiefan
08-28-2017, 04:42 PM
A New Vaccine Could Make The Brain Immune to Heroin And Opioids (LINK) (http://www.sciencealert.com/a-vaccine-could-make-the-brain-immune-to-heroin-and-opioids-scientists-say )

skuthorp
08-28-2017, 04:50 PM
It will never be legal to use, follow the money, and the jobs, and the prison profits.

Yeah yeah, call me a cynic.:)

Dan McCosh
08-28-2017, 04:54 PM
Heroin was developed to counter the effects of morphine. A vaccine would assume that addiction is the result of a virus or microbe. There seems to be something going on here, but the story is pretty much incomprehensible.

sharpiefan
08-28-2017, 04:54 PM
It will never be legal to use, follow the money, and the jobs, and the prison profits.

Yeah yeah, call me a cynic.:)

I hear you. I was wondering who's going to throw up the biggest roadblocks.

ThomRose
08-28-2017, 06:09 PM
The one problem I can see is people who have had the vaccine, and then have pain for which the opioids are the best treatment will be unable to ameliorate their pain. I have never experienced serious pain, at least not on a chronic basis, but I feel for the people who have had that experience. I worry that in an effort to fight the opioid epidemic, we may sentence a lot of people to a life of pain. Perhaps this vaccine has some good uses, but it does not sound like the answer to the current problem.

PeterSibley
08-28-2017, 06:09 PM
My only use for opiods has been in the ER and for a week there after, I'd prefer them to remain effective for that. Pethidine was a life saver for me once.

outofthenorm
08-28-2017, 08:53 PM
Perfect. The cure for the overuse, mis-use and abuse of these drugs is - wait for it - a new drug!

sharpiefan
08-28-2017, 09:03 PM
It's not a lifetime cure, but it may help someone trying to get clean avoid slipping back into the habit on a bad day.



To encourage that defensive reaction, Janda's team designed small molecules called haptens that resemble the opioid molecules, but with proteins attached called epitopes that act as a binding site for antibodies produced by the immune system.

Once an immune system is trained up with a series of vaccination shots, it will learn to recognise molecular structures that look like opioids thanks to exposure to these beckoning proxies and will send out antibodies that cling to the drugs, preventing them from crossing the blood-brain barrier for up to eight months.