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View Full Version : A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema



J.Madison
08-21-2017, 08:40 PM
Let me introduce Julia, an Atkin designed Ingrid Ketch. She was built in 1960 somewhere up in Desolation Sound on a barge by a Norwegian fellow named Christiansen for his family. They cruised to Mexico and Hawaii on board. The boat was built very faithfully to the original design.

I am now in the final stages of building a new Dyneema rig. Information is a bit scarce online, so I will try to include some tutorials and how-to information.

This is how I found her, for sale on the Wooden Boat classifieds.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-before-launch/i-vWdps7T/0/d99158bd/X3/IMGM7572-X3.jpg

She had been out of the water for almost two decades, fully restored and in great condition.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-before-launch/i-xJ74GzC/0/70fb0b4a/X2/IMGM7527-X2.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-before-launch/i-KwXLmjF/0/29b522fc/X3/IMGM7537-X3.jpg

We set to work on the remaining jobs before launch. Painting, adding an electrical system, and the biggest job- rigging.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-before-launch/i-wZ8rkvv/0/ead73967/X2/IMGM7986-X2.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-before-launch/i-kdg3fFq/0/1a1002f7/X3/IMGM8000-X3.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-before-launch/i-K9xsNvr/0/bd7e23a1/X2/IMGM8003-X2.jpg

J.Madison
08-21-2017, 09:09 PM
Painting makes such a difference.
https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-before-launch/i-gfWPBrx/0/df31d69f/X3/IMGM8012-X3.jpg

Cabin lights made a big difference as well. We used extra warm LED uplighting for low power draw and a very cozy light.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-before-launch/i-DJKwkpr/0/3797ae6c/X3/IMGM8149-X3.jpg

The boat had gorgeous spars that were built not long before it was laid up. The Sitka Spruce masts had been scraped free of paint and given 20+ coats of varnish in a labor of love. A new bowprit was made of BC Fir by the previous owner. The masts were exactly built to Atkin's specifications, a rare and surprising thing. Most Ingrids have reverted to a masthead configuration, many with alloy masts. The standing rigging however was lousy. It was a mix of 7x7 and 1x19 ss very poorly spliced and failing.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-before-launch/i-nK6h9Wg/0/e036ab37/X3/IMGM7569-X3.jpg

Because the rig is built with spliced loops resting on bolsters at the upper ends of all the rigging, I needed something that was splice-able. Because I did not have exact lengths for each piece of rigging, I needed to be able to make the lower ends in place. I practiced splicing some 1x19 and it was fairly miserable. I priced out STA-LOC terminals for the lower end, and they are not cheap. The more I worked my spreadsheet, the more I started to see that I could rig in heat-set Dyneema for the same price as stainless steel, it would be twice as strong and last twice as long. The weight savings is just bonus.

I worked up my sizes and had them reviewed by famed PNW rigger Brion Toss. (He also sold me the rope, and the book to make sense of it.) This is all of the rigging for a complex ketch. 700 ft of various sizes. I could lift the entire pile easily in 1 arm. This stuff literally floats on water, but is much stronger than steel. You are looking at heat-set Dyneema, STS-HSR by New England Ropes. This is their standard SK-78 rope that they heat set, which nearly doubles the cost but makes it suitable for standing rigging. Creep, stretch, and strength are all improved by the process.
https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-f8XdCKf/0/3db67db3/X3/IMGM8175-X3.jpg


Because this is a traditional boat, and for added protection of the masts I decided to leather the eyes. I also parcelled and served the entire rig. Dyneema has two enemies, UV degredation and chafe. Serving protects against both. UV resistance when left bare is 8-10 years. This is nearly as good as SS, but without UV exposure the life could be nearly infinite. There is no fatigue cracking or stress corrosion or any of the other things that affect a wire rig.

I used #60 tarred nylon seine twine for the service. I liked the stuff from Seattle Marine, it is branded with their own logo, and comes in 2lb rolls. That is the kind of store that has massive steel access hatches in stock in 3 different styles for the fishing fleet. The twine shown is only a fraction of what is required for the whole rig.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-8STcdtW/0/1a550de8/X3/IMGM8185-X3.jpg

The serving mallet was made from a locust firewood log and some bent copper straps.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-HMzmdxn/0/d2d8c8d5/X3/IMGM8139-X3.jpg

PeterSibley
08-21-2017, 09:10 PM
I'll follow this with interest!

Bernadette
08-21-2017, 09:16 PM
I'll follow this with interest!
yeah me too..I've yet to rig my own yacht so maybe this is a good alternative for me also.

amish rob
08-21-2017, 09:28 PM
I'll follow this with interest!
This is EXACTLY how I'd like to rig the Blue Moon. All shippy looking and proper like.

I cannot wait to see the end results.

Thanks for the lovely thread, so far. :)

Peace,
Robert

AJZimm
08-21-2017, 09:33 PM
Following with great interest.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

J.Madison
08-21-2017, 09:37 PM
The groove in the mallet is not a perfect half circle. The groove has a bit of lip left on the leading edge. You need the mallet to be able to hang on the rope by itself even without the twine wrapped around it. You don't want the groove too deep, or the twine passing over it will not put any force on the rope to keep everything together. I recommend a different diameter groove on each face of the mallet to match the ropes you are working with.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-jxg5h6w/0/c833075b/X2/DSCN3295-X2.jpg

Determine the length of each shroud. After adding in the allowances for the loop diameters, splice bury, turnbuckle length, etc... I bought 10% extra length of each size, and then cut them off the coil at 8% extra. This was to make sure I didn't get to the last one and come up short.

The first step to making a piece of rigging is the cut out the leather. I used a hefty hide of Latigo, which can handle the outdoor environment. I found one in the stacks that was thick enough to be strong but thin enough I had a chance of working it. This half hide is far more than was needed, but the whole thing was $200 bucks and I'm sure the extra will come in handy forever.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-rSbvJ8H/0/75786cc4/X2/DSCN3265-X2.jpg

The leather was cut out with rigging shears (useful for the Dyneema) and then scribed and punched. I used a 3/8" pattern. This shorty must have been from way up high on the mast.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-z58fLxX/0/ebd7ba09/X2/DSCN3273-X2.jpg

After marking out the splice tail and eye diameter the eye is parcelled. Parcelling was done with 3Ms Temflex Friction tape. This is just cotton strip saturated with a solvent free rubber compound. The same thing is available elsewhere as well. I found a Rudder article from the 1930s advocating the use of this type of friction tape for parcelling, so its been around a while. I would not use anything with more traditional solvents as they may interact with the Dyneema. Besides, this friction tape is amazing. You'll love it.

The rope is tied between two heavy objects with icicle hitches and the leather lightly seized into place. I used the diamond stitch found in Brion Toss's The Rigger's Apprentice. I would have served under the leather, but my mast tracks were not high enough to allow clearance over that large of a diameter.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-Wjk7Pmq/0/b98a2964/X2/DSCN3206-X2.jpg.

The stitch starts in the middle of the leather and works to one end and then back from the middle to the other end. This is the hardest part of the whole thing physically. A sail makers palm would have probably prevented some of my more exotic blisters. I used thin seine twine for the thread, I probably should have gone a size or two smaller. A good tip is to bevel the underside of the leather so it can pull up to itself more easily and appear closed. Getting the width right so it will stretch tight and close but not be too loose or open is part of the process.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-jvsjLdx/0/6571f0e4/X2/DSCN3212-X2.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-Ds4939d/0/7ccfc422/X2/DSCN3196-X2.jpg

jsjpd1
08-21-2017, 09:43 PM
Beautiful boat there Mr. Madison! Congratulations and thanks for letting us follow along.

J.Madison
08-21-2017, 10:09 PM
Splicing is dead easy. Apparently so easy that I don't have any photos of it. First mark out the taper length. I used 28 diameters. The bury is 80 D, make a mark 6 inches above that on the standing part and upset the braid to this point. The heat-set process makes the rope very stiff, and once you upset it into an accordion it will stay that way. Run the tail up the accordion and out at the mark. You want a nice long smooth taper that goes right to zero. Divide the taper into 11 sections (12 strand) and cut and remove one strand at each mark. I even trim the last strand at an angle so it goes to nothing smoothly. You can then milk the whole splice back into itself and the tail will disappear inside.

This description assumes you are serving. It will hold tenaciously at high loads, and the serving keeps it from flogging apart at low loads. If you go bare rope, you need to use a brummel locking splice or stitching for low load reliability.

Because you upset the ropes lay, it needs to be pre-loaded to reset everything. Accurate measurement is impossible otherwise. I used a big come-along winch between a tree and my truck. Blocking all four wheels just got me enough friction on dry ground. 7mm needs to be pre-loaded to 2000 lb, 10mm at 3000 lb.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-SfBjvCF/0/6782e059/X2/DSCN3274-X2.jpg

The clever thing that you can barely see in the picture above is the rope between the piece of rigging and the winch. The tree end gets a large thimble to spread the load and a crane strap to the tree. Because the dyneema does not knot worth beans, it is slid up into a piece of soft amsteel just like a splice. I can go into the rope at any point, along for 3 ft and then pop it out and tension everything up. This infinitely adjustable link made it possible to do any piece without moving the truck.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-XhjBSxd/0/5e1f78d0/X2/DSCN3277-X2.jpg

Parcelling is next. We parcelled from bottom to top so it would shed water. Not that it probably matters, but tradition dictates. The parcelling and serving needs to run in opposite directions. One clockwise, the other counter clockwise.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-B9tCFFn/0/c8cf53f0/X2/DSCN3280-X2.jpg

The serving is started by hand until there is enough laid to rest the mallet on. I begin by wrapping several feet loosely around the rope. I then place a 1" tail along the run and start taking firm wraps around over that tail. Work all of the loops tight against each other and by the time you run out of loops you will be ready to start with the mallet. Thread it on as shown. Taking wraps around the handle will add friction and make the serving tighter. This is very easy to over-do. When serving by hand I used 1 wrap, when serving quickly by "flinging" the mallet around the rope I used no wraps, and it was still a bit too tight in places. The tar on the spool keeps it from feeding out too easily so there is lots of friction always.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-xqwmxsw/0/013eee73/X2/DSCN3285-X2.jpg

Give the mallet a little flip and shake the rope just right to keep it spinning around. You can go very quickly using a whole lot of muscle, or you can go almost as quickly using very little effort by hitting the frequency just right. You will have lots of time to study resonant frequencies and wave theory. It seemed to work well to have about 700 lb of tension on the shroud while serving, maybe a little less when getting to the ends. This also assures that you are locking the lay of the rope into its fully set position. This will keep it from changing length during travel.

Now you're off and running. Toss estimates 20-30 ft per hour. That may be about right. Don't let that scare you. The serving was the quickest part of the whole thing. Leathering and splicing take the majority of the time, so why not use 1-2 more hours per shroud to have excellent and attractive protection. I generally could make 1 shroud start to finish each evening after work.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-k2cCMzM/0/38011649/X2/DSCN3294-X2.jpg

Phil Y
08-21-2017, 10:38 PM
Wow! I dont understand some of that, but wow, thanks. Im storing that away for when I have to redo my rigging.

Looks like a lovely boat you found there too.

But werent you building the Maid?

J.Madison
08-21-2017, 11:13 PM
The mallet spins around with a blur, leaving a perfectly consistent, even wrap. It takes about 1 ft of twine per inch of serving. My longest shrouds at over 50 ft could not be done with a single 2lb roll. You start doing math as you go, 8 rounds to the inch, 12 inches to the foot..... nearly 5000 revolutions for the long shrouds. The mallet must have nearly 50,000 revolutions on it at this point. Its breaking in nicely.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-WGzSvPc/0/5e3de60a/X2/DSCN3250-X2.jpg

When I get to the end, I stopped and pulled out 2 fathoms of extra and cut it off. I then serve down each leg of the eye by hand.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-xrVGWpV/0/3e656491/X2/DSCN3255-X2.jpg

The main serving is then brought up over the ends of each leg. This seizes the throat and prevents any side loading on the splice.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-bCNhjQV/0/bb285dbf/X2/DSCN3259-X2.jpg

At this point the whole thing is as stiff as wire. Roll it up gently and label.

The boat was up in BC, so working on it required a 7 hr road trip each way. You can see the bolster on the mast that will support one of the rigging loops.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-kwCcbrK/0/f5da1df0/X2/IMGM8302-X2.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-7GvrzsP/0/74eb5ec1/X3/IMGM8321-X3.jpg

My parents came up to help several times. Here we are installing the mast tracks. They are bedded in goop, SB screws dipped in creosote/varnish mixture and driven in with the yankee screwdriver. The brace follows up for final setting.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-SHsMsZT/0/9ffa276c/X3/IMGM8304-X3.jpg

J.Madison
08-22-2017, 12:11 AM
The new mast step, a beautiful piece of old growth yellow cedar, is slightly different than the old step. I needed to change the angle on the bottom of the mast and clean up the tenon sides to the new angles. This was definitely a "measure 6 times then hold your breath and cut once" type of job.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-nxJt3hF/0/d6fb7af0/X3/IMGM8317-X3.jpg

The end was then treated with several coats of creosote/varnish and sealed in with pure varnish.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-d4bHJCJ/0/b82d3976/X3/IMGM8326-X3.jpg

The jumper stay had to be finalized in place, happily before the masts went up. After splicing it was served on the spot. You can also see the two grommets that are for the jumper stay and spring stay. That is the shortest loop that can be made with 7mm line and still get full non-overlapping bury of each tail. The seizings look rather shipshape I think.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-qJv7m44/0/8c0f2349/X3/IMGM8331-X3.jpg

The first stay with tension.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-LRGpSS6/0/6b23a050/X3/IMGM8337-X3.jpg

The bobstay is the highest loaded stay on the boat. Rather than getting a single piece of large diameter dyneema, I decided to take a clue from the old sailing ships and use a large grommet for the bobstay. This reduces the load on each leg by half. I also decided to take a risk and make it just the right size with no turnbuckle.

Here it is being preloaded. The sharpie marks lining up mean that I had just the right amount of extra that when I tensioned it everything pulled up exact. That is an important point I forgot earlier, when tensioning the splice, the tail grabs first and actually pulls the eye into the splice making it smaller. I assumed it would do the opposite, pulling out of the splice slightly as it was loaded. I learned to leave the eye 1/4" large so that when loaded it all pulled down exact.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Rigging/i-BDgCmRg/0/214ff849/X3/IMGM8350-X3.jpg

J.Madison
08-22-2017, 12:21 AM
https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-bbR7D64/0/9fb15473/X3/IMGM8360-X3.jpg

I made the bobstay nominally 1/16" shorter than our measured dimension, and it fit perfectly. We had to disconnect the bowsprit at the sampson posts to connect the bobstay and then push it down to put the pin in. Not having a turnbuckle saved weight, a failure point, and cost. I think it looks better too. The bowsprit side stays were tensioned with dyneema lashings instead of turnbuckles, which is a great way to do things.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-MNmMpMt/0/117f91de/X3/IMGM8395-X3.jpg

The siezings on the bobstay grommet are put on very tightly and should keep the whole thing from failing if one half cuts through for any reason.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-75DxBN9/0/b3339f64/X3/IMGM8412-X3.jpg

Chris249
08-22-2017, 12:32 AM
Wow! I dont understand some of that


You're doing better than I am..... I don't understand any of it.

Great thread, though.

gilberj
08-22-2017, 12:53 AM
Wow !!!!

Bernadette
08-22-2017, 01:16 AM
what will you be doing at deck level…deadeyes and lanyards?

gypsie
08-22-2017, 01:24 AM
What a beautiful boat!
That's fascinating rigging. What have you taped (parceled?) the rope with, under the serving?
Nice interior lighting too!

skaraborgcraft
08-22-2017, 03:12 AM
I once spent the best part of a week trying to master an Admiralty Splice, in some chunky galv wire. I ca only say its "easy", when you know how......i went back to Flemmish eyes splices. It would appear anything more than 3-strand gives me a mental block.
It will be interesting to see how this pans out, the only other cruising boat i know of with dyneema rigging, had to occassionally re-tension, and if i recall had some dead-eyes made up, which did look a bit odd on a modern boat. The weight saving and sail carry power was noticable, apparently. Nice wee ship.

mohsart
08-22-2017, 06:49 AM
I once spent the best part of a week trying to master an Admiralty Splice, in some chunky galv wire.

The same as Crane Splice? Much easier than Liverpool Splice to get to look good IMHO

/Mats

sharpiefan
08-22-2017, 07:11 AM
Beautiful boat, beautiful work. The Spirit of Hervey Garrett Smith lives!

sharpiefan
08-22-2017, 07:23 AM
You're doing better than I am..... I don't understand any of it.

Great thread, though.
Available from our host at the WoodenBoat Store -

The Marlinspike Sailor (LINK)
http://cdn.woodenboatstore.com/images/uploads/1151_4218_large.jpg (http://www.woodenboatstore.com/product/book_Marlinspike_Sailor/knots)


#include [std-disclaimer]

Garret
08-22-2017, 07:43 AM
What a fantastic thread! Beautiful boat, great pics (you need to get out of the city ;)) & good descriptions. beautiful work too.

Garret
08-22-2017, 07:46 AM
What a beautiful boat!
That's fascinating rigging. What have you taped (parceled?) the rope with, under the serving?
Nice interior lighting too!

From post #7:


After marking out the splice tail and eye diameter the eye is parcelled. Parcelling was done with 3Ms Temflex Friction tape. This is just cotton strip saturated with a solvent free rubber compound. The same thing is available elsewhere as well. I found a Rudder article from the 1930s advocating the use of this type of friction tape for parcelling, so its been around a while. I would not use anything with more traditional solvents as they may interact with the Dyneema. Besides, this friction tape is amazing. You'll love it.

Sailor
08-22-2017, 09:13 AM
I love this. I plan to do something similar with my big boat build when I get to rigging her. Keep up the good work.

J.Madison
08-22-2017, 01:26 PM
I'll pause on the rigging for just a moment and cover the launch events. We headed North in a full truck, inside and out.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-V5QhZt7/0/8f0f7b10/X2/IMGM8352-X2.jpg

The smoke from BC wildfires was thick.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-nnQsbzT/0/f2718427/X2/IMGM8355-X2.jpg

Many last minute jobs were tackled, including rigging the anchors and all other gear. This is our spare, a very hefty fisherman from a Canadian foundry that was going out of business.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-hJ7kDzZ/0/09ecc638/X2/IMGM8371-X2.jpg

We started to wet down the bilge for the first time in two decades. Here is a sign of the things to come.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-NmMrmGT/0/55ef81e0/X2/IMGM8373-X2.jpg

The job list was posted on the first morning and slowly got crossed off.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-XG6tgjj/0/259ff242/XL/IMGM8377-XL.jpg

Boat and crew, ready for launch.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-v4JKXSK/0/87e44461/X2/IMGM8429-X2.jpg

J.Madison
08-22-2017, 01:48 PM
These fancy hydraulic trailers really mean business. It was able to self rescue several times, once when it sunk to the hilt in soft gravel under the boat, and again when it was high centered on the driveway with the truck spinning out. It can lift itself and the truck off the ground, not to mention a boat.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-mhDmRL7/0/37283104/X2/IMGM8449-X2.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-wb4bdsB/0/ccb2e253/X2/IMGM8476-X2.jpg

The masts were hauled on a flatbed behind the crane truck.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-pQpCXrk/0/4738614a/X2/IMGM8521-X2.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-JnPT2Nv/0/0ca80612/X2/IMGM8531-X2.jpg

The masts were stepped with the crane. Because the rigging was not completed on the lower end, temporary rope shrouds were ran to the chainplates to keep everything vertical without having the crane on the clock during all the splicing of the lower ends.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-46cvDPZ/0/2004e776/X2/IMGM8536-X2.jpg

Oops, there was a tangle. Better climb up freehand, don't make that mistake on the main mast.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-szh7g9L/0/8fd9d6e9/XL/IMGM8541-XL.jpg

J.Madison
08-22-2017, 02:19 PM
Stepping the main mast. It was a nice snug fit in the mortise.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-x8NjPvs/0/202bbc07/XL/IMGM8559-XL.jpg

After an hour or two of quickly splicing some shrouds, it was time for launch. We wanted to be the last boat in on Friday, so we could sit all weekend with easy access to the lift in case of emergency.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-qsDPFdp/0/35a442fb/X2/IMGM8588-X2.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-GZNQpTs/0/348ef14b/XL/IMGM8594-XL.jpg

And let the flood begin. The water immediately started to rise, it inundated the first pump and kept going. It hit the second pump and slowed some. The third pump as able to keep up. We had 3 12V pumps wired to the house battery and 2 110V AC pumps running off of shore power. We didn't end up needing them all, either the 12V or 110V could keep up with it on their own.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-wQBCSpc/0/c68af495/X2/IMGM8601-X2.jpg

Rivers ran down the inside of the planking, pretty much everywhere.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-p6jsXZx/0/cc4e7669/X2/IMGM8606-X2.jpg

This is the amount of water we were making constantly through the first day. It started to taper off after that. We were down to 1 garden hose full time after 3 days. The planking is all quarter sawn old growth that is sealed inside and out, so it was fairly slow to react. After a week it was down to 1 single bad seam, which I recaulked making us a tight boat. That adventure probably deserves its own thread.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-f6TWLJc/0/70e148f6/X2/IMGM8633-X2.jpg

Everyone I worked with was very professional and fairly affordable. The Canadian dollar helps there. Newcastle Marina in Nanaimo was excellent. They let me do my thing, didn't bother me, and two yard days plus a launch cost less than $200 CDN!

Paul G.
08-22-2017, 03:00 PM
Awesome job!

J.Madison
08-22-2017, 03:14 PM
Back to the rigging. This rig has a spring stay between the masts. The lower end of this had to be spliced in place. My wife climbed up the rigging to take care of it. The process was the same as all the other lower ends.

-Install shackles and turnbuckles
-Wrap shroud around a thimble on the turnbuckle
-Mark the center point of the thimble
-Add two inches to the length to account for how much the splice shrinks the line
-Center the eye about that mark and parcell with friction tape
-Serve the eye by hand
-Cut to length and mark taper
-Upset braid and run the splice
-Taper
-Milk the tail back into the splice
-Fit around the thimble
-Tension the turnbuckle

This is all much easier on deck than hanging from the rigging.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-3TdJWD2/0/1002e41c/XL/IMGM8614-XL.jpg

Do note that when cutting the shrouds to length that a few inches must be added. This is because the braid gets a larger diameter due to the splice, effectively shortening it. You get some of this shrinkage back when tension is applied, but not all of it. The unrecoverable shortening was experimentally found to be 2" for 7mm and about 2 3/8" for 9mm.

One of the advantages of serving the rig is that you can use oversized thimbles. This larger bend radius is kind to the dyneema and very strong for the loading. I used high quality hardware from Crosby throughout. The thimbles are extra heavy duty wire rope thimbles, and the shackles and turnbuckles came from them as well. This is all American made industrial equipment with quality galvanizing and all the load ratings and spec requirements you could hope for. Because they do not come from the yachty store they are much cheaper than anything with "marine" in the name. They will also give lots and lots of warning before they fail due to corrosion, unlike most marine turnbuckles. Mostly, they fit the boat and play nice with my galvanized chainplates and fasteners.

Here are some details of the lower end of the rigging.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-MsKjWmt/0/40576800/X2/IMGM8627-X2.jpg

I made sure that the turnbuckles were all the way extended so that I have lots of room to tension the rig. The turnbuckles are of the jaw-eye variety, with a shackle to make sure there is no side loading. This particular shroud/thimble combo is a bit snug with the serving, so it will not fully seat into the thimble until the first load is applied. Of course you can see that I stopped all of the serving far enough above the deck to complete the splicing. This will be parceled and served in place after splicing is complete. The bronze (brass?) sailmakers thimbles on the jib stay are because I decided to serve that stay. The jib hanks to these grommets with soft shackles and the grommets ride up and down over the serving. This is a bit of an experiment, I will report on how it works in practice.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-sK893rC/0/58e1fc1e/X2/IMGM8660-X2.jpg

The above image shows how the splice will suck the tail of the line up into the splice when loaded. Its easy enough to take off tension and open it up a bit more. Be careful though, you can only adjust one direction. You can't push more tail up into the splice.

After two days of splicing and flood-fighting we were ready to head south.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-832g8J5/0/eac0f1b5/XL/IMGM8646-XL.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-xB6LLnW/0/91b2242e/XL/IMGM8641-XL.jpg

MAGIC's Craig
08-22-2017, 03:26 PM
Good to see the Julia G afloat. I used to wonder how the lovely girl was going to get extricated from Bryan's yard, and am delighted to note that she made the move to Nanaimo so well. I chuckled with that photo of barefoot Bryan holding the electrical cord, looking a bit perplexed.
Your rigging thread is excellent and should serve (sorry!) to inspire others to give it a try. And it is nice to learn that once that garboard was reefed out and re-caulked, she is dry again.
If you do continue with your cruising plans, please give some thought to visiting Morro Bay (California's Central Coast - half way between Monterrey and Santa Barbara.) We would be happy to host you and provide wheels should you need to get supplies before you continue south.
Cheers,
Craig and Vicky Johnsen
Sooty Tern WEE BONNIE
ex MAGIC
ex VIXEN
ex TALOFA

Garret
08-22-2017, 03:45 PM
Everyone I worked with was very professional and fairly affordable. The Canadian dollar helps there. Newcastle Marina in Nanaimo was excellent. They let me do my thing, didn't bother me, and two yard days plus a launch cost less than $200 CDN!

"fairly affordable"???? In an east coast yard you would've spent that much by the time the boat was halfway off the trailer. Lucky dog!

J.Madison
08-22-2017, 04:10 PM
Good to see the Julia G afloat. I used to wonder how the lovely girl was going to get extricated from Bryan's yard, and am delighted to note that she made the move to Nanaimo so well. I chuckled with that photo of barefoot Bryan holding the electrical cord, looking a bit perplexed.
Your rigging thread is excellent and should serve (sorry!) to inspire others to give it a try. And it is nice to learn that once that garboard was reefed out and re-caulked, she is dry again.
If you do continue with your cruising plans, please give some thought to visiting Morro Bay (California's Central Coast - half way between Monterrey and Santa Barbara.) We would be happy to host you and provide wheels should you need to get supplies before you continue south.
Cheers,
Craig and Vicky Johnsen
Sooty Tern WEE BONNIE
ex MAGIC
ex VIXEN
ex TALOFA

Thanks! I am still trying to speak softly about heading farther south, but that would be the dream.


"fairly affordable"???? In an east coast yard you would've spent that much by the time the boat was halfway off the trailer. Lucky dog!

Seattle would have been brutal as well, but some things are better up north. I did catch them as they locked up at closing time to pay, so maybe I got away better than I should have.

Phil Y
08-22-2017, 04:26 PM
I think you did well with that wife you got!

Sailor
08-22-2017, 05:00 PM
A wife who goes aloft to splice eh?

J.Madison
08-22-2017, 05:36 PM
I think you did well with that wife you got!

Yes, yes I did. She can splice and serve and helm in heavy seas. She also let me spend all of her money on an old wooden boat.

I'd say that I chose carefully, but really I just got lucky.


https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-qCd86g4/0/02b3dd3f/M/20170811_101110-M.jpg

Woxbox
08-22-2017, 06:00 PM
Superb work in every detail. I'm impressed! I am curious as to how you chose shackles over the new-fangled deadeyes done up with dyneema.

gilberj
08-22-2017, 06:14 PM
Damn, I missed you when you were in my patch... what a fine boat...

AJZimm
08-22-2017, 06:19 PM
Great boat, great story and great tutorial! Thanks for taking the time to share it with us.

Bernadette
08-22-2017, 07:32 PM
your boat and your journey reminds me so much of my own, with PEQUOT (an Atkin DRAGON design) then DECATUR (Alden MALABAR II). it is so wonderful to see a dedicated couple working together to realise the dream of a boat. your photos speak volumes! i particularly enjoy the photo of the yacht behind the blue truck just emerging from out of the forest.

all the very best to you both. I do hope either one of you has been writing, or will start writing a daily personal dairy of events of your time afloat. makes for good reading when you are older.

J.Madison
08-22-2017, 07:39 PM
I am curious as to how you chose shackles over the new-fangled deadeyes done up with dyneema.

Cost. Those fancy aluminum deadeyes cost more than a turnbuckle. I briefly entertained machining my own, but thought galv rigging screws fit the boat better. The Coligo guys also don't recommend lashings for boats over 30 ft. I'm not sure why, you can certainly make them strong enough. I'm guessing it has to do with rigging preload on modern boats.

Here is a rigging closeup with Orca whales in the background!

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-7NQw3w7/0/7712533d/X2/P1020185-X2.jpg

Coming right at us.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-2ZmSn7r/0/73af771b/X3/IMGM8676-X3.jpg

We went south through Dodd Narrows on a favorable current (wild!) just before a 3 tug log boom went through.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-JnQJL4B/0/976f7d66/X3/IMGM8664-X3.jpg

And set the sails for the first time. Mygod they are pastel blue and green. Why?!? We do have a full set of cotton sails that are crisp white and appear to have been barely used. For show I guess.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-Xh7wc3t/0/b9583e14/X2/P1020195-X2.jpg

We ambled south through the world's greatest cruising ground.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-RkJsfp6/0/a547f9f4/XL/Route-XL.jpg

The only real trouble was crossing the Straight of Juan de Fuca. We started before first light on a good forecast. Partway out into the straights a horrible, thick, dense, cold, crippling fog rolled in. We do not have radar, and the chart plotter was not hooked up yet. We navigated by chart and compass, on the radio with Seattle traffic the whole way, terrified to be in one of the busiest shipping lanes on earth. By the time we realized what was happening we were miles outside the safety of Cattle Pass, with the current now strongly against us if we turned back, and no guarantee we could find the narrow pass in the fog. So we pushed on, eventually without incident. Duly noted; that little wisp on the horizon is not just early morning mist that will burn off. That is the seed of a terrible fog. Turn around now and go buy radar!

At least the sun is showing here, it was at times completely obscured.


https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-QRQKFJW/0/0a4a4a98/X2/20170815_082214-X2.jpg

J.Madison
08-22-2017, 07:55 PM
We popped out of the wall of fog just ahead of this motor boat into a perfect beautiful day at Port Townsend. The kids were out in their prams, people were laying on the beach, and we must have looked like we'd seen ghosts.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-BPJMWCN/0/54730dcf/X2/P1020215-X2.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-PxD3rSh/0/27cae5ec/X2/P1020218-X2.jpg

We rowed into town for a much needed breakfast in the shipyard.

Now for some glamour shots of the rig. I really like how the serving stands out against the sky. It looks just like the ink on the sailplan drawing.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-MV9P4KD/0/780d0596/X3/IMGM8785-X3.jpg

If you study the forces on the rig, you will see that it is very heavily stayed against going over backwards, but very little to keep it from going over forwards. This on a downwind boat. The runners aren't even on the original plan, but I consider them critical equipment. There is no way to get any tension in the headstays otherwise, the mast just keeps bending forward. Phase II will add a bit more aft staying before going offshore. A proper masthead backstay forked around the mizzen for starters, and likely some masthead shrouds over aft swept spreaders for the mizzen. Raising the spring stay to the mizzen top will complete the arrangement and allow for a mizzen staysail to be flown.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-k2qnNfm/0/b1577eb8/X3/IMGM8797-X3.jpg

Overall I'm convinced this is a grand old ship in remarkably good condition.

That just about wraps up the standing rigging, except for finishing off the serving on the lower ends. I need to do major work on the running rigging, as the new deck deleted all of the existing features for that. Its a blank slate to start from.

J.Madison
08-22-2017, 07:57 PM
your boat and your journey reminds me so much of my own, with PEQUOT (an Atkin DRAGON design) then DECATUR (Alden MALABAR II). it is so wonderful to see a dedicated couple working together to realise the dream of a boat. your photos speak volumes! i particularly enjoy the photo of the yacht behind the blue truck just emerging from out of the forest.

all the very best to you both. I do hope either one of you has been writing, or will start writing a daily personal dairy of events of your time afloat. makes for good reading when you are older.

Thanks Bernadette, I believe it is photos of your dragon that is on the cover of Atkin's Of Yachts and Men that sits on my table right now!

Bernadette
08-22-2017, 08:31 PM
Thanks Bernadette, I believe it is photos of your dragon that is on the cover of Atkin's Of Yachts and Men that sits on my table right now!
thats correct.

i like your galvanised turnbuckles. very shippy and in keeping with the age of the boat.
i had deadeyes on DECATUR and tensioning was done every so often as needed. i had no problems with them as such. however with rigging screws the rig can be set up so much easier and with less ongoing bother!

do you know of an Atkin Ingrid named PILAR? (i met her and crew mid Queensland coast many years back. they gave me a copy of the "Arts of the Sailor" by Hervey Garret Smith).

J.Madison
08-22-2017, 08:44 PM
I know of an Ingrid in Port Townsend named Pelin, but no Pilar. Pelin has a nearly identical served rig to the one I just built.

stromborg
08-22-2017, 09:34 PM
Wow

I had been thinking you were due a bit of chastisement for lack of progress on your Maid....never mind

skaraborgcraft
08-23-2017, 02:47 AM
The same as Crane Splice? Much easier than Liverpool Splice to get to look good IMHO

/Mats

Not sure Mats, will have to look that one up. An Admiralty splice does not slip, i would hope a crane splice would not either!

skaraborgcraft
08-23-2017, 03:02 AM
Yes, yes I did. She can splice and serve and helm in heavy seas. She also let me spend all of her money on an old wooden boat.

I'd say that I chose carefully, but really I just got lucky.


https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-qCd86g4/0/02b3dd3f/M/20170811_101110-M.jpg

Dragging an old beemer out of a hedge at a young ladies request works wonders eh!

mohsart
08-23-2017, 05:21 AM
Not sure Mats, will have to look that one up. An Admiralty splice does not slip, i would hope a crane splice would not either!
Crane Splice: Each strand goes under two, over one strand, crossing it. Kind of like an eye splice on a three strand rope.
Liverpool Splice: Each strand goes around and around the same "meeting" strand. Kind of like a sailmakers splice on a three strand rope.

Liverpool Splice can slip, unless it's served, but well all wire splices should be served...

/Mats

johngsandusky
08-23-2017, 09:08 AM
A fine vessel, and fine work. Thank you for sharing.
I'm sure you'll be happy with the boat. A good friend owns Nada, Nigel Calder's glass version. I have sailed and cruised on her, she can go anywhere.
I sympathize with you fog/traffic challenge. I have passed the Chesapeake entrance and entered New York Harbor in very thick fog without radar. I do use a radar reflector, hand held gps, depthsounder, and security call if entering or crossing a channel, which I try to avoid. Wandering Star has steel rigging, bronze stanchions and much other metal in her rig. Commercial ships always see us on radar, though I am careful to stay out of channels and in shallow water when possible.
Fair winds.

AJZimm
08-23-2017, 12:25 PM
Now for some glamour shots of the rig. I really like how the serving stands out against the sky. It looks just like the ink on the sailplan drawing.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-MV9P4KD/0/780d0596/X3/IMGM8785-X3.jpg



Calendar shot

Sailor
08-23-2017, 01:05 PM
Wait until you've replaced those mint coloured sails, then re-shoot this one. I agree, it's a great shot.

Bob Cleek
08-23-2017, 02:19 PM
Great boat. Great thread!

"And set the sails for the first time. Mygod they are pastel blue and green. Why?!? We do have a full set of cotton sails that are crisp white and appear to have been barely used. For show I guess."

My guess is that the color in the sails was intended. It's far easier on the eyes in the sun. Not frequently seen these days, to be sure, but pure bright glaring white sails have only been around as long as Dacron. A bit of color tones them down. Eye strain can be more of a problem than one might imagine. It's the sailor's version of "snow blindness." L.F. Herreshoff recommended similar pastel colors (he was partial to the green) for decks and cabin tops to save the eyes. The popularity of sunglasses have provided an alternate solution to the problem, but if your sunglasses go overboard, I bet you'll appreciate the colored sails.

gilberj
08-23-2017, 02:29 PM
Getting caught in fog in a small vessel is frustrating. specially single handed. With two, one persons, can focus on steering by the compass and the other can take positions on the GPS (chart plotter??)and all the other stuff. It was worse in the not too distant past with no GPS. Loran was not as helpful. It is still nerve wracking any way you do it because it is difficult to detect the moving stuff, like other vessels.

J.Madison
08-23-2017, 03:30 PM
Let me expand a little on the recent history of the boat. It was purchased in Oregon around the turn of the millennium with some rotten planks in the bow area. Bryan, a professional boatbuilder, bought it for his own boat and brought it up to Canada. He spent 9 months full time restoring the boat. He replanked where necessary, added some frames, relaid the deck, built a galley, added the beautiful bulwarks, covering boards, and aft end of the cabin trunk. His work was top quality and definitely a labor of love.

The years slipped by, his daughter was born, and the boat never did end up being launched. The boat is named for that daughter, now an extremely talented young ballerina. Their family worked very hard to help us ready the boat and launch it, I am very thankful for that, but even more thankful that they have entrusted their beloved boat to us as the next caretakers.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-tkMRDwn/0/8d910227/XL/IMGM8561-XL.jpg

The hull is all old growth vertical grain cedar and fir on oak frames. The keel looks to be a massive fir timber, with gumwood stem. Clamp, shelf, and stringers are fir. It is fastened with square iron boat nails in remarkable condition. There are only a few that I am keeping my eye on as the head is starting to get smaller. Bryan included several large boxes of heavy galvanized screws for a refastening job he decided wasn't necessary yet. These are the proper boat screws that are nearly impossible to find these days. The massive tiller is a solid stick of yew. Square nuts are used throughout the construction.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-before-launch/i-JCk4fJf/0/282e0c90/XL/IMGM7475-XL.jpg

I did just get word that we will be showing at the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival this year (Sept 8-10) so you are all welcome to come see the boat then.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-r4nV3PM/0/b988146d/L/20170811_155638-L.jpg

AJZimm
08-23-2017, 05:43 PM
I look forward to seeing Julia at PT and meeting you. I'll be there with Fire-Drake.

Alex Low
08-23-2017, 07:55 PM
Bryan sold her!!!!

Way to go J. Madison and crew.

Looks great.

gilberj
08-23-2017, 08:49 PM
Bryan??? Do I know him.

MAGIC's Craig
08-23-2017, 09:33 PM
Bryan Gittens from Ladysmith, BC. BTW, Bryan apparently will be attending both the Victoria Classic Show and the PTWBF aboard his 30' wooden Lyle Hess Cutter, SILVANA.

If you have not made the acquaintance of this engaging character, I would heartily recommend that you look him up. Among many interesting facts, he has single-handed around Cape Horn enroute to South Africa.


Bryan??? Do I know him.

gilberj
08-23-2017, 09:49 PM
Don't know him....I'll have to look him up.....Sounds like my sort of guy....

Bernadette
08-24-2017, 12:41 AM
Calendar shot
now that you mention it…yeah! absolutely!
BTW, those coloured sails are great. keep them!

Bernadette
08-24-2017, 12:55 AM
Cost. Those fancy aluminum deadeyes cost more than a turnbuckle. I briefly entertained machining my own, but thought galv rigging screws fit the boat better. The Coligo guys also don't recommend lashings for boats over 30 ft. I'm not sure why, you can certainly make them strong enough. I'm guessing it has to do with rigging preload on modern boats.



https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-Xh7wc3t/0/b9583e14/X2/P1020195-X2.jpg



J,
I'm really taken with your use of the Dyneema and the worming and parcelling... so I'm giving some serious early thoughts to doing the same on my new yacht.
however, i may have missed an earlier explanation with regards to stretch when the rig is all set up…
i can see in your photo that the rigging screws or turnbuckles are undone to their almost fullest extent. how much do you anticipate in stretch to allow for the turnbuckles to be tightened/wound in and over what period of time?
even if i use deadeyes, i will still want to calculate the stay length at launch/set up and allow for any (?) stretch later on.

J.Madison
08-24-2017, 11:12 AM
If you have not made the acquaintance of this engaging character, I would heartily recommend that you look him up. Among many interesting facts, he has single-handed around Cape Horn enroute to South Africa.

Bryan will indeed be showing his new boat Silvanna at the Port Townsend and Victoria shows. He is a first rate boatbuilder, seaman of great experience, and an all around good guy.


J,
I'm really taken with your use of the Dyneema and the worming and parcelling... so I'm giving some serious early thoughts to doing the same on my new yacht.
however, i may have missed an earlier explanation with regards to stretch when the rig is all set upů
i can see in your photo that the rigging screws or turnbuckles are undone to their almost fullest extent. how much do you anticipate in stretch to allow for the turnbuckles to be tightened/wound in and over what period of time?
even if i use deadeyes, i will still want to calculate the stay length at launch/set up and allow for any (?) stretch later on.

Good questions. Here is what I have learned so far. Dyneema needs to be sized for stretch and creep, unlike steel which is sized for strength. A good rule of thumb is going up 1 diameter size from the SS it replaces. This usually assures that the rig preload is below the creep threshold so you do not have any problems with creep. The resulting shroud is now several times stronger than the steel but still far lighter.

I purposefully set the turnbuckles all the way open, just so I have the most ability to tighten the rig as everything settles in. There are two reasons that the length would change, besides creep which I do not anticipate having. First, splicing the top ends showed me that when the rig is loaded for the first time, I will get about an inch out of each shroud as the braid over the splice settles in. This is a 1 time event, but requires enough wind to get to about 15 degrees heel. Second, it is possible that the braid along the rope was slightly upset due to coiling/transport even with the serving. I may get another small amount out of each shroud as this slack is pulled out and the leathered eye settles into its bolster, etc..

Without serving, I wouldn't have had much chance of getting the lower ends in the right spot. The rope would have changed too much during transport so my final measuring would have been wrong. In that situation I would have had to pre-load each shroud right before I put it on the mast. If you have accurate numbers and are building both ends on the bench, it doesn't matter because you can preload and immediately measure for the bottom splice and then preload again after splicing. Everything will then be perfect when installed.

Take careful measurements when doing the first splice and you will learn how much it shrinks during the splice, and then how much it gives back when loaded. It will be very consistent.

Colligo marine is the leader in this stuff in the states. Some good info on their site. They are the sole distributor for the only other option besides the New England STS-HSR that I used. He sells Dynice Dux, which is made by Hampidjan in Iceland for the fishing industry. I believe it is available at better prices outside the US.

Sailor
08-24-2017, 11:19 AM
You'll let us know more details once things have settled in then? I love the idea of this stuff as well. Thanks for showing us what you did and how.
Cheers,
Daniel

Woxbox
08-24-2017, 12:10 PM
I did use the Colligo package on my trimaran, including the deadeye/lanyard setup rather than turnbuckles. One big advantage here is that the deadeyes can be set far apart so there's a huge amount of allowance for set and "settling in." With turnbuckles, no question the measurements are more critical. As to cost, I'm sure the galvanized turnbuckles win, but compared to stainless turnbuckles and associated fittings, the Colligo deadeyes proved cheaper for me.

mohsart
08-24-2017, 02:16 PM
What was the price for the dynema?

/Mats

jpatrick
08-24-2017, 02:59 PM
I did just get word that we will be showing at the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival this year (Sept 8-10) so you are all welcome to come see the boat then.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Launch-and-Voyage/i-r4nV3PM/0/b988146d/L/20170811_155638-L.jpg


Good news on the PT Festival. I will also be there in my much smaller, Emily Ruth. I look forward to meeting you.

My small boat also uses dyneema for the standing rigging. I did not get the heat treated material but I did pre-load prior to splicing. I also loaded the spliced shrouds and forestay in order to set the splices. The first season I used 1/8" material that is strong enough but resulted in too much stretch. Then I replaced it with the next size up and haven't had any more trouble. I use deadeyes that were shop built.

Jeff

Bernadette
08-24-2017, 04:30 PM
jeff
thank you for taking the time to answer my question. i will have a look at the Colligo internet site. and please do let us know how the rig settles in once yo get more sea time.
i had a look at the PT festival lineup: some great boats arriving there. enjoy!

bernadette

zauberberg
08-24-2017, 11:47 PM
Very nice job, thank you very much for sharing.

I am considering also a dyneema rig for my Gartside Cutter, but the lightning protection problem got me rethinking again. Could you comment a little on this topic please? What takes the role of the electricity conducting steel stays in case of lightning on your boat?

J.Madison
08-25-2017, 12:10 AM
Getting hit by lightning is bad, even with steel stays. A boat with no metal aloft is probably less likely to be hit, but it could be worse if a strike does happen. Pick your poison.

There are very few boats that are truly set up to absorb a lightning strike safely. I suppose you could still run a conductor up the mast or up one of the shrouds if you were inclined.

Sailor
08-25-2017, 08:09 AM
I can't imagine what a suitable lightning conductor would look like to take the power of a lightning strike from masthead to the water. You'd have a copper rod the size of the mast. I think these systems are like airbags in a car. The car will still be a write-off but you'll survive. Your rig will still be written off, but your boat won't explode into a ball of fire. It certainly is something that needs consideration in a cruising vessel.

Garret
08-25-2017, 08:34 AM
I can't imagine what a suitable lightning conductor would look like to take the power of a lightning strike from masthead to the water. You'd have a copper rod the size of the mast. I think these systems are like airbags in a car. The car will still be a write-off but you'll survive. Your rig will still be written off, but your boat won't explode into a ball of fire. It certainly is something that needs consideration in a cruising vessel.

It does indeed need consideration, but there certainly are a number of different opinions on how best to deal with lightning.

Mark0
10-09-2017, 10:06 AM
Hi,

I just came across this thread and would like to give a big thank you for your time outlining your rigging procedure and experiences. My wife and I are also planning on parcelled and served dyneema for our rig so this is a great guide.

I was also concerned about lightening protection without any metal overhead to offer protection on deck. In our case we built new laminated solid masts so I ran a 2/0 AWG conductor in the layup with solid copper termination points at either end. It wasn't that much of a pain and gives a bit of comfort.

Cheers,
Mark

wsgilliam
11-08-2017, 10:36 PM
Some of the most beautiful work I have ever seen pictured here....

Mark0
11-11-2017, 04:48 PM
Hi J,

Wonder what you used to measure your tension after doing the splice.

Mark

J.Madison
11-11-2017, 07:46 PM
I had a crane scale I borrowed from work. Even with the wheels blocked I couldn't get much past 2500 lb without sliding the truck across the yard, so that may be a useful data point if you don't have a scale.

Alan H
11-11-2017, 11:06 PM
Absolutely gorgeous. I am *Seriously* impressed with your splicing work on the dyneema. There's a new backstay in my boats future, maybe I ought to splice up my own!

Rich Jones
11-12-2017, 01:34 PM
I'm sitting at home recovering from surgery, catching up on threads. It was a delight to go over this one.
Well done!

Jay Greer
11-13-2017, 12:52 PM
When you put to sea, even without our acknowledgment, which is overwhelmed by the quality of your work, you have the peace of mind of knowing you have done it right, very right! Plus, those of us who still use a Yankee Scredriver Salute you as well! Bravo!
Jay

peb
11-13-2017, 01:07 PM
I read this thread and I am really impressed. I did not parcel and serve my Dux rigging, as I thought the added windage would be quite significant. But it certainly seems to make the rig bullet proof with respect to UV and chafe.
I have been an advocate of this stuff for a couple of years now, having really enjoyed working with it on my boat and the end result. The more I think about it, the more I think it should be the material of choice for standing rigging on a wide range of boat types.

babaluey
11-13-2017, 04:15 PM
I know of an Ingrid in Port Townsend named Pelin, but no Pilar. Pelin has a nearly identical served rig to the one I just built.

Hey, I just found this thread - beautiful boat and good choice on the rigging! Pelin is my boat - we did this last year, also with Brion's help, and I can vouch that compared to splicing steel, working with this stuff is a dream. Here's a brief video of me flipping the serving mallet, out behind Brion's shop. https://youtu.be/BOZD1uAhRko

J.Madison
11-13-2017, 04:43 PM
Nice video! What was the purpose of the stabilizer line to the tree?

Hope to meet on the water next summer.

Mark0
11-13-2017, 06:06 PM
Hi,

Wondering how you sized your Dyneema, did you use the colligomarine "stretch chart" (link below) or some other guidance material ?

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/556621c8e4b02628a8d3bde8/t/562688a5e4b08b7d50464bfa/1445365925954/Stretch+Equavalents.pdf

Thanks,
Mark

J.Madison
11-13-2017, 06:40 PM
I did reference that chart. For the most part, I sized things for SS 1x19 and then went up a size. This resulted in safety factors over my 60 degree heel loading (max load) of 8-10. I feel really safe about that. Its much stronger than the steel it replaced.

babaluey
11-13-2017, 07:32 PM
Nice video! What was the purpose of the stabilizer line to the tree?

Hope to meet on the water next summer.

That was how Brion and crew showed me to set it up - it just reduces the amount of play in the line so it doesn't take such wide sweeping circles to keep it going. Sometimes had two or even three of those lines on a single piece.

Where is your boat now?

auscruisertom
11-13-2017, 08:23 PM
Great thread and congratulations on relaunching Julia back into her element.
Enjoyed the cruising part of what used to be my old stomping grounds.

Mark0
01-28-2018, 07:31 PM
Hi J,

I've been reading this thread again (great reference!), thinking about getting some rigging ordered in the next month. You mentioned that "The riggers apprentice" (latest addition, mine has nothing) has a section on dyneema rigging, does he get into the creep / stretch guidance. I'm debating purchasing a copy.

Cheers,
Mark

PeterSibley
01-29-2018, 03:54 AM
A marvelous job !!!! Well done .

Rich Jones
01-29-2018, 05:18 PM
You, and your wife, are quite amazing. You build boat after boat, plus re-rig and get Julia sailing again. All the while building a new post and beam shop.
When do you find time to work for a living???

J.Madison
02-04-2018, 09:07 PM
Hi J,

I've been reading this thread again (great reference!), thinking about getting some rigging ordered in the next month. You mentioned that "The riggers apprentice" (latest addition, mine has nothing) has a section on dyneema rigging, does he get into the creep / stretch guidance. I'm debating purchasing a copy.

Cheers,
Mark

I'm not sure, sorry. I don't have the latest edition. He did tell me that the new version had more info. It might be worth emailing his shop. They are generally responsive.


You, and your wife, are quite amazing. You build boat after boat, plus re-rig and get Julia sailing again. All the while building a new post and beam shop.
When do you find time to work for a living???

Actually, I always feel like I'm not getting enough done. Especially in winter. I've taken up boat design the last couple winters, so I feel like I'm doing something productive, but I don't have to go out in the rain.

I don't have kids, or a TV. I do have a restless spirit...

Sailor
02-05-2018, 08:17 AM
I never feel like I'm productive enough either. I do have a TV though. That probably doesn't help my situation.

Mark0
02-05-2018, 07:46 PM
huh, just made me realize this spring will be my 20 year anniversary of not owning a TV.

J.Madison
03-13-2018, 08:43 PM
We've been doing lots of projects on Julia, and I think I'll keep logging them here, even if we move away from the rig for a bit.

With the onset of winter, we realized that the boat needed more ventilation. I had some jatoba offcuts that I used to make dorade box ventilators.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-LBDRKxf/0/7f1de43e/L/IMGL9752-L.jpg

Snap your fingers twice.....

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-5NzrGXn/0/2e9cc5e5/XL/IMGL0348-XL.jpg

They should dress things up a bit for as long as I can keep up the varnish. Not shown is the 4" diameter copper pipe set through the deck in the forward part of the box. It goes up within 2" of the top of the box, which should keep all but the most extreme seas out. There are screw in caps that replace the cowls if necessary. As soon as the bank account allows for new sails, the boom will be raised a bit, which will greatly increase the lifespan of the ventilators.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-9ZPQqXw/0/62f9932a/XL/IMGL0360-XL.jpg

Just visible in the background was the new bronze sheet horse. Already getting green spots from the deck-bucket ritual. Its attachment is a bit unconventional, because I wanted to load up the deck beams, not the decking itself, but I did not want to impede on the headroom 1 millimeter. So I countersunk a bronze bar and recessed it into the beams and used two flathead fasteners up into the sheet horse base from the bottom.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-H55vsrf/0/4f892a75/XL/IMGL0363-XL.jpg

That Crosby shackle will be replaced with bronze soon.

Garret
03-13-2018, 08:48 PM
Very nice!

My dorades are similar in design & even with 3 to 4" of green water over the cabintop, only a couple of drips came into the cabin.

Pitsligo
03-13-2018, 09:00 PM
Very pretty!

What make of ventilator cowls are those? They're a lot nicer than the Daveys I've seen.

Alex

J.Madison
03-13-2018, 09:14 PM
I think they are beautiful, but they are fairly affordable stamped sheet brass. They were ~$150 each, compared to the cast bronze ones at nearly $1000 each! We will see how they hold up. Not name brand. Likely Asian in origin. They are the full 4" size, many others are only 3".

Sailor
03-13-2018, 09:45 PM
Very nice work.

Wagemaker
03-13-2018, 10:41 PM
Absolutely beautiful boat! Awesome!

WgMkr

J.Madison
03-14-2018, 01:30 PM
We have also been working on adding coamings. I almost left them off, but I wanted someplace obvious to mount cleats and winches so they didn't seem like randomly placed tripping hazards. I also like how the coamings keep things like water bottles, sunglasses, chart books, etc.. contained. The backrest and sense of protection is nice too.

They are built from jatoba, which must be the worlds hardest wood. It is more dense than purpleheart! Holes have to be exactly the right size for screws, its about like machining iron. The coamings are tapered from about an inch at the top to two inches at the bottom, giving a vertical outside face but a sloped backrest on the inside.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-nx5v3Sj/0/f2b5a932/L/IMGL0139-L.jpg

All-thread rod was used to fasten them to each deck beam. The hole for the washer and nut was counterbored and bunged. Drilling the long holes was a careful operation, but none of them came out the side, thank goodness.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-SSLSPF3/0/2a342c8e/L/IMGL0142-L.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-J39VPtD/0/534611b0/L/IMGL0144-L.jpg

I always seem to forget to get pictures of things when they are finished. Probably because its usually dark out.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-NGcHn39/0/86ac1f80/L/IMGL0146-L.jpg

Anyway, I have more than enough varnish to maintain, so these will be oiled. If that doesn't seem to be working, I might end up painting them.

Additional support will be provided by the cast bronze winch bases I am gearing up to make.

J.Madison
09-11-2018, 02:16 PM
I've been slowly buying new sails over the last year, trying to give the wallet time to recover between them. I went with a loft a few blocks from my house. They are big-branded, but all the sewing is done right there locally.

They are a fairly heavy construction, with lots of reinforcement and seam coating. I opted for cream colored cloth, because I really like how easy it is on the eyes in bright sun, and I wanted to look a bit distinctive coming up over the horizon.

https://photos.smugmug.com/San-Juans-2018/i-85Mbjc6/0/79f25437/XL/IMGL1219-XL.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/San-Juans-2018/i-KTgb34F/0/b77c7568/L/IMGL1378-L.jpg

Both the Main and Mizzen were built a bit shorter on the luff to allow raising both booms. Now there is standing headroom under the mizzen when standing in the cockpit (though not when on deck), and the main boom clears the heater flue and dorade vents by a healthy margin. An inconsequential amount of sail area was lost, but more than made up for in the big jib. The jib is substantially larger than the original, my intention was to ease weather helm and have a powerful tool for off the wind when the main is best left stowed if the wind is strong enough to allow it. As original, the main was the primary driver on all points, with the gybing risks, chafe, and general difficulty that entails in a seaway.

https://photos.smugmug.com/San-Juans-2018/i-cJN84kL/0/84058d4e/L/IMGL1701-L.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/San-Juans-2018/i-gkkwJSQ/0/6dfa1d84/L/IMGL1305-L.jpg

Pretty sloppy furl on the jib there....

We made new sail covers for the main and mizzen. The jib still needs one.

Mark0
09-11-2018, 07:42 PM
Sweet photos!

I missed the coamings post, but I'll second the idea of oiling them. I've got a couple coats of pine tar / linseed oil (allbacks) with a little turps on our cap rails and it look great so far, and easy to apply. I had a "hot pot" on deck so applied it around 60 deg C to thin it all out for the first few coats. It just smells right too.

What sail cloth are you using ? We've gone with a cream Oceanus as something in tanbark was a bit more difficult to source in the right width. The bolt ropes are spunflex and it all looks great so far (can't wait to go for a sail). the material looks a little pink, but we have been told it will settle down in no time.

So jealous of a boat in the water !

Cheers,
Mark

J.Madison
09-11-2018, 09:11 PM
I geared up for bronze casting specifically to make some winch pedestals. That included taking a class offered by the Center for Wooden Boats.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Bronze-Casting/i-HGMT92S/0/0e8d3fa0/L/IMGL0432-L.jpg

I then built a furnace using a donated keg from the Diamond Knot brewery and some 3000 degree castable refractory.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Bronze-Casting/i-FsnjBv9/0/ea7c6e06/L/IMGL0607-L.jpg

The gas nozzle. (1/8" hole drilled in the copper pipe)

https://photos.smugmug.com/Bronze-Casting/i-zQfgkG5/0/5c52ed42/L/IMGL0526-L.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/Bronze-Casting/i-rRkZX6F/0/2debeb45/L/IMGL0616-L.jpg

After burning a wood fire inside for most of a day, it was ready to fire for real. Note that lots of steam holes are needed in the keg to allow pressure to off-gas during the curing.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Bronze-Casting/i-wttdxK7/0/ca3a1cef/XL/IMGL1025-XL.jpg

And after all of that, I ended up going with wooden blocks for the winch pedestals. I just couldn't come up with a design in bronze that I felt adequately supported the coaming instead of the other way around. I could have made it work with complex coring, but decided against it. In the end I'm very happy.

The winches are used to set up the running back stays and trim the jib sheets.

https://photos.smugmug.com/San-Juans-2018/i-Q4Bwxrf/0/380b881c/L/IMGL1241-L.jpg

J.Madison
09-11-2018, 09:28 PM
Now that I finally had the jib, I could install the sheet tracks. I could not find 7" flathead bronze bolts anywhere, so I made some by forging silicon bronze rod into the correct shape and cutting a slot for a screwdriver.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Bronze-Casting/i-mB8wLsR/0/9cfe1731/L/IMGL1213-L.jpg

Threads were cut with a die, which only barely works.

https://photos.smugmug.com/San-Juans-2018/i-TwQm79q/0/7b0a92e3/L/IMGL1401-L.jpg

Heading out of Cattle Pass to cross the Straights at first light.

https://photos.smugmug.com/San-Juans-2018/i-XDHchjc/0/5afc0e6b/L/IMGL1535-L.jpg

Continuing south, the wind built until we were sailing rail-down for the first time. Everything passed its first real load test. This is the wind that was threatening to deposit boats onto the beach farther north at the Wooden Boat Festival.

https://photos.smugmug.com/San-Juans-2018/i-v2NPHgj/0/d03efb89/L/IMGL1695-L.jpg

The other winches we added are a pair of halyard winches for the main and jib. The mizzen needs one as well. The staysail will get a 2:1 purchase instead of a winch. Even so, the jib is slightly too tall on the hoist due to the Dyarchy stay, so I need to re-splice that before we can get proper luff tension. Keeping in mind this is a low tension rig- no standing backstay.

https://photos.smugmug.com/San-Juans-2018/i-JfJHM3F/0/9e851599/L/IMGL1477-L.jpg

J.Madison
09-11-2018, 09:39 PM
All that work for bronze casting was not wasted however. I needed a staysail crane (boom pedestal.) I made up some split patterns to my own design- based roughly off the old Merriman patterns.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Bronze-Casting/i-Q8wKbPM/0/b053e179/L/IMGL0924-L.jpg

This one barely fit in the mold.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Bronze-Casting/i-mbPdG2V/0/8f90df90/L/IMGL0926-L.jpg

Pattern removal was not easy. In the future, I might cast the two tangs on the end as solid and machine it out after the fact. That area of the sand needed reinforcing with nails before I got a succesful pull.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Bronze-Casting/i-L4GzJpk/0/24cfb4d9/L/IMGL0928-L.jpg

The eye-bolt was easier, if only I could focus the camera.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Bronze-Casting/i-DPkBQLg/0/decdc790/L/IMGL1020-L.jpg

It does have a bit of a trick though. A bit of 316 stainless bolt is used as a sort of permanent core, which keeps me from having to cut threads on the part after casting. The bolt was bored lengthwise and then cross drilled so the bronze will lock into it. It sits about 1/8" up into the bronze shoulder, so is very strong.

To get a good pour, it was drilled full length with a small diameter to serve as a vent. When the pattern was rammed up, a piece of wire was intersecting the end of the hole. When it was removed a clean vent was left all the way out of the sand. The bolt was heated with a torch and placed in the mold right before pouring.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Bronze-Casting/i-FW7W2p9/0/010859fc/L/IMGL1029-L.jpg

You can see here that it filled nicely with bronze, even the vent hole has bronze flowing all the way out of the end.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Bronze-Casting/i-TdVtWsb/0/daef054b/L/IMGL1030-L.jpg

J.Madison
09-11-2018, 09:43 PM
The crane itself I didn't get any pictures of casting. It was a fairly large pour, finished weight about 7 lbs. It is very stout. The loop on the front will be for a sheet block. Its already starting to patina after its first week on the water.

https://photos.smugmug.com/San-Juans-2018/i-DLdjgLL/0/14f2504c/X2/IMGL1622-X2.jpg

J.Madison
09-11-2018, 09:49 PM
Sweet photos!

I missed the coamings post, but I'll second the idea of oiling them. I've got a couple coats of pine tar / linseed oil (allbacks) with a little turps on our cap rails and it look great so far, and easy to apply. I had a "hot pot" on deck so applied it around 60 deg C to thin it all out for the first few coats. It just smells right too.

What sail cloth are you using ? We've gone with a cream Oceanus as something in tanbark was a bit more difficult to source in the right width. The bolt ropes are spunflex and it all looks great so far (can't wait to go for a sail). the material looks a little pink, but we have been told it will settle down in no time.

So jealous of a boat in the water !

Cheers,
Mark

I don't remember the name of the cream cloth, but its the only cream Doyle offers I believe. It did sort of have a pink hue in some lights, but on the water it looks great. Different weights do appear slightly different, but I haven't noticed it once they were outside.

gypsie
09-12-2018, 12:56 AM
The crane itself I didn't get any pictures of casting. It was a fairly large pour, finished weight about 7 lbs. It is very stout. The loop on the front will be for a sheet block. Its already starting to patina after its first week on the water.

https://photos.smugmug.com/San-Juans-2018/i-DLdjgLL/0/14f2504c/X2/IMGL1622-X2.jpg

That is such a delight to behold.
Congratulations, well done.

Sailor
09-12-2018, 12:29 PM
Simply gobsmacked. She's beautiful. Jay will need to hurry up with his Bright Star posts or you'll soon overtake him. Keep up the great work.

stromborg
09-12-2018, 04:57 PM
https://photos.smugmug.com/San-Juans-2018/i-Q4Bwxrf/0/380b881c/L/IMGL1241-L.jpg

Oddly enough I thought of you and your winch bases when I saw this in Port Hadlock Marina on my way to the PTWBF
https://photos.smugmug.com/Boats/Kayaks/i-c5KgMbB/0/9634284f/L/2018091214481882-IMG_1405-L.jpg
There are a number of interesting bronze bits on this otherwise crusty looking hull, though she does float...

Phil Y
09-12-2018, 05:16 PM
That one needs a bit of love, for sure.

Sailor
09-12-2018, 05:19 PM
I would love to find a few of those old crusty beyond saving vessels with fancy bronze bits on them. Like the guys did who are building Arabella. Would come in handy. And to re-use old stuff is a good thing we should all do.

wizbang 13
09-12-2018, 05:20 PM
Jmad,
Can you cast up some solid thimbles for the shroud ends?
I can see the present ones crushing .
Boat and rig look very nice !
bruce

Small boats rock
09-12-2018, 05:30 PM
Wouldn't those cast thimbles be a problem with the galv turnbuckles?

J.Madison
09-12-2018, 05:35 PM
Jmad,
Can you cast up some solid thimbles for the shroud ends?
I can see the present ones crushing .
Boat and rig look very nice !
bruce

I don't think they will crush. They are rated for several sizes larger steel cable, because of the serving. So my 3/8" dyneema goes around an "Extra Heavy" thimble designed for 1/2"-9/16" wire rope. They are pretty solid.

If they do crush in an extreme load, the mast won't come down- and it will be an interesting data point.

stromborg
09-13-2018, 09:09 AM
I forgot to add, that little crane is a very nice looking bit of hardware!

StevenBauer
09-13-2018, 10:58 AM
I forgot to add, that little crane is a very nice looking bit of hardware!

Yes. I sorry we didn’t get a closer look while in Port Townsend. I guess we’ll just have to come back. ;)

AJZimm
09-13-2018, 05:02 PM
Nice work John.

Sailor
05-19-2019, 09:13 AM
Anything else to report on Julia's maintenance progress? Are you going to get back on the Maid any time soon or is that on hold for the next while?

Jay Greer
05-19-2019, 11:07 AM
Wow! The savings of weight aloft is worth the price of admission!
Well done John!
Jay

Sailor
05-19-2019, 11:21 AM
True Jay.
Jonathan, have you made any sort of estimate on how much weight you've saved?

J.Madison
06-21-2019, 12:29 AM
Anything else to report on Julia's maintenance progress?

Lots of projects underway on Julia, thanks for asking.

I finally added shore power, which required a place to mount the breaker panel. That evolved into adding a little bulkhead with cupboards to the chart table. The left door is the only one intended for regular opening, and will stow all of the flares and other emergency equipment.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-xcSwGWq/0/37f45411/L/IMGL3644-L.jpg


Our haulout this year saw some new machined pins for the rudder to fix a wobble, and a new transducer. I also straightened the prop shaft using the Big Hammer method, which got the runout back within a few thousands of an inch. Pics are after a bit of paint, ready to go back in the water for another year.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-28tfmT5/0/9cb8dd54/X3/IMGL4762-X3.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-KbBBLXm/0/5569d46e/X2/IMGL4756-X2.jpg

I've been building a new main boom as well. Its a box section, fir. A new boom is needed to support the mid-boom sheeting arrangement and use of my conventional reef points. I'm looking forward to not having the boom roll over and dump the sail right after I furl it every time.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-2rPdXxj/0/9980d884/L/IMGL4814-L.jpg

Some new bronze hardware is needed.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-v4LWRk3/0/63d36b93/L/IMGL4815-L.jpg

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-rgJNtDR/0/91d8dcce/L/IMGL4839-L.jpg

J.Madison
06-21-2019, 12:44 AM
https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-kxCTLQk/0/fec6d985/L/IMGL4840-L.jpg

Hard to tell the scale, but this was a big pour. Its almost 18" long, 12 lb poured, which meant about 15 lbs in the crucible. That is a lot when its liquid. There was a slight cooling defect, but overall it came out so well that I filled the depression with a gas welder rather than cut the whole thing up and try again.

Its rivetted in place with 1/2" copper rivets.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-wvDgcLT/0/3adca9a7/L/IMGL4852-L.jpg

A couple more coats of varnish and it'll be ready.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-xSjCvqR/0/b1e0ba16/L/IMGL4850-L.jpg

I also installed a new windlass, converting from manual to a powered unit. That was a big job, but I can't seem to find a single picture of it installed. A new windlass was needed for the new larger chain, and after dropping and resetting in the rain in the middle of the night a few times on the old manual windlass, I decided I was feeling less puritanical about a powered one.

And of course,.... we've been doing a lot of sailing.

Here dropping the mooring under sail in Port Madison after a quiet night.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-WxDMTk9/0/513d09a7/X3/IMGL4258-X3.jpg


Here cruising Lake Union

https://photos.smugmug.com/Julia-Projects/i-WnQTGWH/0/7be30c67/L/IMGL4422-L.jpg

Geftb
06-21-2019, 01:25 AM
I was just reading this thread last night in preparation for a new dyneema rigging. :d
She sure has found a great custodian! The guy you purchased her from must be pleased to see it all unfolding.
Great work James

Phil Y
06-21-2019, 01:58 AM
Beautiful

Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

J.Madison
06-21-2019, 11:19 AM
True Jay.
Jonathan, have you made any sort of estimate on how much weight you've saved?

Total weight savings easily exceed 100 lbs over the whole rig. I bought 690 ft (!) of Dyneema, which includes the length for all the splices and such. That would be a heavy pile of wire rope.

bdbFC
06-21-2019, 12:50 PM
So beautiful!

Jay Greer
06-21-2019, 02:48 PM
I don't think they will crush. They are rated for several sizes larger steel cable, because of the serving. So my 3/8" dyneema goes around an "Extra Heavy" thimble designed for 1/2"-9/16" wire rope. They are pretty solid.

If they do crush in an extreme load the mast won't come down- and it will be an interesting data point.
Personaly, I would prefer solid thimbles, Merriman once made them in all sizes, I think these will take an adjustment crush and then remain in the shape they like.
Bronze, lost wax castings of the solid thimbles would be the way to go here if push comes to shove and you are forced to replace the galvanized steel stamped thimbles you have now. They can also be water jet cut out of plate but the groove would need to be cut on a CNC mill.
Jay